Best Motorcycle Campsite Items, Goodies and Ideas?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Perkio, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    I rarely take the time to make a campfire. I usually get food/fuel just before the sun sets, then boogie out to a stealth campsite and set up my hammock. Read for a couple hours in the hammock, then sleep. As opposed to tent camping, I find that it's much more relaxing to hang out in the hammock vs. sitting by a campfire; but to each their own. Also, in the southeast, campfires are more smoke than fire, even if you can find some good wood.

    In the morning, I make coffee first, then tear down camp while I drink my coffee. Skip breakfast or eat a power bar, grab lunch when it's time for gas, then keep riding until dinner. However, traveling this way, I am downright offensive after about the third day. If I am lucky enough to find a campsite near water, I will bathe and clean clothes. I carry about 50 feet of cordage for a bear bag, and I use a drybag as a bear bag if needed. The cordage is also used to hang my clothes at night. If I am expecting rain, I carry a 10 foot sil-nylon tarp in addition to my hammock tarp and I hang all my riding clothes, boots, and helmet, under the sil-nylon tarp at night.

    My moto trips are only slightly more comfortable than my backpacking trips...primarily because I can eat town food rather than dehydrated meals all the time. Regardless, I still lose weight on my moto trips.
    RimBenty, Halen, Livestrom and 3 others like this.
  2. dvwalker

    dvwalker Working to ride

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    good info in this thread...

    high price to pay to lower base weight, but zpack dyneema (aka cuben fiber) tents and dry/stuff sacks are all the rage for UL AT/PCT/CDT thru hikers these days. I just purchased their food dry bag and bear kit
  3. -E-

    -E- Klaatu barada nikto

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    Not sure if this is 205 but here you go

    Air mattress inflate bag. There are a few factory made inflate bags for around $30. I thought I was slick by using a plastic soda bottle top and O-ring with a trash bag to inflate my air mattress. The guy in the video uses a good rubber band and a trash bag. Grab your pop corn, enjoy the movie and never lip an air mattress again.
  4. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    ^^^^^^
    Can't believe I never thought of this after all these decades ...
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  5. N-Id-Jim

    N-Id-Jim Long timer

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    This is brilliant! Thanks.. looks like i need to add a couple trash bags and rubber bands to my kit...............
  6. Bill 310

    Bill 310 Poser Emeritus

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    When you are riding up in the Arctic or just in Canada's bug country you learn to speed swap your helmet for a bug hat. If a girl has to go and the clouds of black flies, horse flies and mozzies have already once descended on your unprotected precious lady bits the funnel's value goes to 11.

    As my wife says, "works like a hot damn, and you don't have to deal with a few dozen itch bites in the "special places" for the rest of the day."

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  7. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire Just this guy...

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    Yet another reason I am grateful for my Y chromosome.
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  8. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Gratuitous Advisor

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    ... and so tell me, how do you avoid bug bites on your "funnel"?
  9. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire Just this guy...

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    It’s all about minimizing exposure.
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  10. dvwalker

    dvwalker Working to ride

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    hold up any used air mattress to a window that has been inflated from mouth, you'll notice a network of dark alien splotches...that is mold thriving from the moisture of your breath....inflation bag or small pump will help to avoid mold condtions. Not to mention potential health concern of breathing in air from a moldy air matteress

    I started using a stuff sack for air mattress inflation, but another option is the thermarest neoair a small palm sized battery powered inflator....lets face it after a long good day of riding your favorite part of the day is blowing up your air mattress 8)
  11. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Old Dog

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    I use the Big Agnes pumphouse bag. I also have the neoair but it won't completely fill the pad so a few pumps with the bag and done.

    Lately I went back to my thermorest self inflating insulated pad and a Helinox cot with the BA 15° bag. Much more comfort but a bit bigger packing, good trade-off and the gs dosent mind.
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  12. HaveMotorcycleWillTravel

    HaveMotorcycleWillTravel In Honduras!

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    Curious for those of you who have travelled extensively in the Americas/Africa... If you brought a stove or cooking setup, did you use something similar to a whisperlite setup, capable of burning dirty fuels, or something that burns off of propane/isopropane? Im curious if it is difficult finding isopro canisters in developing countries?
  13. kojack06

    kojack06 Long timer

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    When you have to run "Code Brown", getting riding boots and armor off can be more difficult than taking duty gear off as a cop in such emergencies.:rofl
  14. 67siia

    67siia Been here awhile

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    listening to this topic...
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  15. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

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    Now, this is from extensive backcountry camping but a little older information. The MSR Whisperlight International stoves as well as a few other stoves like SVEA and similar are the standard in remote location camping. The reason is that they will burn anything. Kerosene is generally available anywhere in the world. The only shortcoming of most of those stoves with that they were primarily made to boil water/melt snow so they have two settings. Off and blowtorch/melt the pan. If I was heading to Africa, I would use one of those stoves rather than propane/isopropane/isobutane stoves.

    As an EDIT: I have used the Whisperlight series MSR since they were called the 600 series stove for many years. Again, a great stove. I bought a Dragonfly years ago and have been very satisfied with that. You might want to look at that. It also burns anything but has a very adjustable setting. I should also point out I have had many stoves over the years. Right now for motorcycle camping I use a Jetboil. Love that stove but I would not use it for camping in really isolated parts of the world.

    KR
  16. GoPlaces

    GoPlaces IG:ADVwxyz

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    I use an MSR one that burns gas you put in your bike- (not the kerosene one) since you will always have gas..

    Then there is no messing with the jet needle size.
  17. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

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    Yep. It burns everything, white gas, kerosene, unleaded gasoline. Just about anything that burns except alcohol.

    KR
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  18. HaveMotorcycleWillTravel

    HaveMotorcycleWillTravel In Honduras!

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    Thanks. I just watched a pretty detailed video by MSR on the pros and cons of each... It seems like the liquid burning stoves are more efficient and versatile, but a little more cumbersome and tedious... Im wondering for the sake of saving weight and space which one takes the cake.
    I have the MSR Windboiler and I love it, the adjustability is incredible. That said the liquid canisters are able to have the pressure adjusted and adjust the feed that way.... liquid fuel seems the way to go though.
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  19. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

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    I believe it is. if for no other reason than logistics. Unless things have changed radically over the last couple of decades. There are still parts of the world that only have gasoline and kerosene. More refined fuels like propane and isobutane or isopropane, especially in very specific pre-made canisters are going to be a hard thing to find in some parts of the world. I think you would be much better served with going with that type of stove.

    Good luck and I hope you share your adventures here.
    KR
  20. 3SportBiker

    3SportBiker Adventurer

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    Aloha!

    My biggest issue since 1995 has been, "I WANT A REFRIGERATOR!"

    OK, obviously that's impossible. But I am sick and tired of Ice and neoprene lunch bags. That's what I've been using for a long time. Over-sized neoprene lunch bags with ice packs or ice I buy on the road to keep my milk and juice and water cold. I'm funny that way. I really need cold drinks on hot days, and I need milk with my coffee or my day is off to a very bad start. But having to constantly buy ice, and throw 80 pecent of it away gets old.

    Finally, I found a Soft Sided Thermo-Electric Cooler. It looks like a duffel bag, uses the Thermo-Electric fan cooling (or heating) and seems to work OK if you don't have huge expectations. I now have a way to cool food and drinks on the trail with 12 volts DC or 110 volts AC. I have a 110 to 12 volt adapter for plugging it in to AC at campsites. It's relatively new, so durability is unknown. And it's not a regular fridge. There is no compressor or coolant. It's simply a Thermo-Electric fan mechanism like there are on the very small dormitory refrigerators. You can't expect it to keep things COLD, only COOL. But it's a heck of a lot better from my needs than neoprene lunch bags and ice. Although I still put in Ice from time to time so I can put ice in my drinks, and to really help chill down the cooler. A little luxury on the road never hurt anyone. After all, ICED tea is great with actual ICE in it, isn't it?

    LINK: HERE

    If anyone has a better solution, buy all means, let me/us know.

    Mahalo!

    -3Sport