Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Motomantra

    Motomantra Registered Lurker

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    Digital volt meter :deal
  2. pilot47

    pilot47 Old Salt

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    On a trip I always carry a whistle in case I ever leave the road and am injured and also something that can be used as a tourniquet, like a long leather shoe lace, piece of line etc. I should do so even when not on a trip.
  3. MasterMarine

    MasterMarine Long timer

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    My whistle is on my camera lanyard. It is a USCG approved one and is very loud and small.
  4. flybigjet

    flybigjet Remove Before Flight Supporter

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    I'm partial to solo riding, so here's a few things that work for me:

    1. Wallet goes in the mesh pocket on my laptop bag that's strapped to the underside of my small, locked top case. It never leaves that location unless I'm in "civvies" and off the bike. That way it's easily accessible if I need it, but also in my line of sight (for peace of mind) whenever I unlock and open the top case.

    2. Driver's license, (retired) military ID, ONE credit card, medical ID and some cash go in a zipped pocket on the jacket-- same pocket, every time. The pocket's on the sleeve, so it's in my line of sight (to confirm it's zipped closed) whenever I put my hands on the controls.

    3. I put a small, double-clip carabiner (like you can get at Home Depot or REI) on my key ring. Whenever the keys aren't being used, the key ring is clipped to the same loop on my riding pants. Every single time.

    4. I keep a spare, well-hidden key taped to the bike that will open the tool box. I also keep a spare bike key taped to the very upper back of the tool box where it can't be seen and can only be felt. To get to the bike key, you have to open the tool box, pull everything out, then feel around for the key.

    5. Always carry some non-perishable food (power bars, nuts, etc.) and a few spare bottles of water. Weird can happen when you're riding.

    6. A basic first-aid kit is always on the bike. Not enough for surgery obviously, but enough to dig out splinters, stop bleeding, bandage a cut or abrasion, deal with diarrhea or an upset stomach, etc. I do carry an "Israeli Bandage" for a large, bleeding wound and a pair of cutting shears-- they're small, light and easy to use (look on YouTube for "how-to" video's).

    7. A small bivvy sac, an "emergency" mylar tent, and a small tube of "camping" toilet paper can be worth their weight in gold. If I'm stuck in the boonies due to an unexpected mechanical failure/illness/injury/weather event/etc. for a night, at least I'll be warm and dry. All three items are small and light and take up almost no space; I carry them in the bag that straps to the underside of my side case lid.

    8. A small "push-on" flashlight on your keychain is surprisingly handy at night and they only cost a few bucks.

    9. A small, inexpensive magnifying glass in your tank bag is also surprisingly useful. My eyes are getting older and it makes looking at small, poorly contrasting print (I'm talking to YOU, Butler Maps) a lot easier when in shade or twilight.

    10. I carry a small 7 oz. spray can of Plexus Plastic Cleaner and a few microfiber cloths. It works outstandingly well "de-bugging" the light, aux lights, wind shield, face shield, sunglasses, etc. at the start of the day. It's the best stuff I've ever used and well worth having on a multi-day ride.

    For my "pre-flight/post-flight" routine? Practice, Routine and Repetition. I keep to the same routine every time I stop. Earplugs go in the container attached to the key ring. Tank bag goes on the seat, NOT on the pump when getting gas. Credit card gets used, then IMMEDIATELY gets put back in the pocket and re-zipped. Keys get clipped to the riding pants whenever they're not being used. Side and top cases get locked as soon as I'm done accessing them. Gear gets put in the same spot, every time in the hotel-- keys, wallet, watch together on the counter, phone and Cardo charged from the same outlet, etc.

    And? If you're willing to deal with their long delivery times (and it IS coming up on winter), AliExpress is a great place to get stuff like clips, lights, first aid kits/pouches, bandages, whistles, etc. inexpensively.

    R.
  5. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    +1
    I do a lot of the same things.....
    Same things in the same place all the time.
    But....why need one hidden key to unlock a box to get spare bike key? Why not just hide spare bike key?
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  6. flybigjet

    flybigjet Remove Before Flight Supporter

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    It's just an additional layer of security. Not perfect, but I felt better doing it that way than putting the actual bike key on the bike.

    Additionally, the tool box key is small and flat, so it tapes well in a hidden location. The bike key is significantly larger due to the microchip and doesn't tape up anywhere near as neatly-- which would make it easier to find.
  7. dravnx

    dravnx Been here awhile

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    +1 for the posting by R
    My mantra for my boxes is "all the way open or all the way closed". This is while I'm on the road or in the garage. Muscle memory will keep you from forgetting to close a box.
  8. Czechie

    Czechie Adventurer

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    Some brilliant tips, will need to go through the thread again.
    I have been also thinking of my learnings and tips I wish I knew before I started travelling on a bike.
    My take away is take care of yourself at least as much as you care about your bike.
    It all starts with eating and drinking. This could be discussed in a separate thread so will stop here. And secondly, try to stretch you body before you ride and after you finish your ride, like when you do any other sport. All that works for me, I practice a bit of yoga so I do some warm up and stretching poses in the morning, when taking a break and when I stop riding. Simple poses, neck, back, shoulders, hands, hips and legs. 10 mins in the morning, 10 mins in the evening helps me to prevent injuries, stay focused and keep going from day to day behind the bars on longer trips.


    Last but not least, travel light!
    cheers.
    Stepy
  9. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    didnt read it all, but later in life I became allergic to bee stings. A bite kit for stings and snake bite is about $10, with enough room to add the basics to it.
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  10. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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    Do your research ahead of time. Extensively.

    Read those ride reports—there are many, many available, especially on ADV Rider.

    Ask questions of riders who’ve done the ride you’re planning. Meet with them in person, if at all possible.

    I’ve done these things and it’s made a world of difference.
  11. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    multi plug-circuit fuse strip, applicable electric plug adapters.
    30 ft of rip cord n 10 clothes pins-pegs, your solar clothes dryer.
    umbrella- 5ft foldable.
    hensel foldable vented- mesh safari hats
  12. peter4d

    peter4d Life is an adventure

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    I have a rhyme I use every time I get ready to leave.

    Spectacles
    Telephone
    Wallet
    and watch

    It also helps to put everything in the same place every time, as it makes it easy to both find and you know if something is missing.

    I have not left anything behind after nearly six years on the road.
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  13. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    Modernized version of:

    Spectacles
    Testicles
    Wallet
    And watch.

    Learned that one from the dad that took us dirtbiking when we were kids.
  14. Valker

    Valker Long timer

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    And "The World's Fastest Indian".
  15. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    n keys
  16. FJRider

    FJRider A Motorcyclist

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    My advice: Tether it or lose it.
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  17. MotoActionADV

    MotoActionADV Level 16 wizard

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    This doesn't rhyme ;)
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  18. Tall Man

    Tall Man Govern yourself accordingly.

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    My riding partner chuckled a bit when he saw that I had packed that combination in my dry bag, just prior to leaving for an extended moto-camping trip in Canada. He changed his tune pretty quickly after the first rainfall (and if you don't ride in the wet, you don't ride in Atlantic Canada.)
  19. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Great posts guys. Any and all tips are welcome. For the body, bike, camping, motels. Just handy tips that have worked for you, however simple. I've learned a lot.

    Have a very happy Thanksgiving...…..be mindful of the weather conditions out there....it's supposed to be a rough one in the USA this year.

    My tip regarding this: Do you REALLY have to be ANYWHERE at a specific time? Don't take chances....if you are tired or the weather is rotten...get a motel....is $100 worth your life? If you don't have $100 for that emergency put a shout out on ADV for HELP...shout loud and long.
  20. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog Supporter

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    This could be peculiar to my aging physiology :-) but has helped me a lot on iron butt days where I'm trying to cover miles quickly... When I stop for gas I go in and pee first, then pump gas, then go pee again. After discovering that trick I can ride out a tank of gas damn near every time.

    .
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