Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    That's pretty funny. Me and the Mrs have two pees. We'll get gas first then we park our bikes as close to the front door as we can get. Go pee. Then wander around enough that we try to pee again before taking off. This way we can get 150 miles before we need gas and pee again. We've lately taken to spending A LOT of time at gas stations.
  2. wetwider

    wetwider Been here awhile

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    Apologies if this has already been addressed: I went through this thread in a hurry and didn't see it, but... Where is a good place on a rider to carry a small ELB, or EPIRB, or PLR - that is, a small emergency locator beacon like In Reach, SPOT & others make?

    Recently I've read a number of advisors saying these things should not be on the bike, but on the rider so they can be activated if rider & bike slide apart in an unintentional git-off. Makes sense, but where on the rider? Every place I've considered, it would hurt like hell, break bones, destroy the device, something, if one landed on it there.

    Anybody got ideas for where on a rider the gizmo would go best? Pocket? Strapped-on? Whaaaa?

    Thanks!
  3. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    It's a compromise. You either take the chance you don't get far from your bike, or you wear it on your person and take that chance. I find if it is on a lanyard around your neck inside your jacket hanging about your solar plexis or a little higher it's as good a place as any.
    knight likes this.
  4. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    Tell me what you're riding and I'll tailor my advice.
  5. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    I have a SPOT with an elastic strap that I would wear around my arm above the elbow.
    Outside my jacket of course.
  6. TheBritAbroad

    TheBritAbroad Just ride.

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    I have a ResQLink in the left leg pocket of my riding pants. I don’t think a slide or impact would damage the unit, and if an impact on the unit itself was hard enough that the unit then broke my leg, I figure my leg would have got broken anyway.

    Either way, it’s better than it being on the bike and me not being able to reach it. On the bike and potentially out of reach it’s completely pointless having it at all.
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  7. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

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    I like the idea of the SPOT on elastic on the upper arm. I have seen a number of people wearing their devices this way. It's with the rider and in the case of the person being unconscious, another person will most likely see it and can activate it if needed. In the bike or in a pocket another person probably won't know you have it or if they do will have to look for it.

    About 4 years ago I wrecked and was unconscious and the gal I was riding with knew I carried my SPOT but she had to find it before she could activate it. It was in my tank bag and I was separated from the bike, not far, but if I came to alone and tried to get to the bike I don't know that I would have been able to. When I did come to I looked for my bike and it took a bit to see it and even when I did I couldn't even sit up much less get to the bike.
    phreakingeek and scarysharkface like this.
  8. knight

    knight Long timer

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    That's where I carried my point and shoot cameras for a year , with all the sweat I only ruined two of them
  9. yobuddy

    yobuddy Been here awhile

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    I didn't go through all 11 pages but one thing I try to do when departing on a trip with a buddy is a quick walk around each others bike. Just checking straps, loose items or anything else causing concern.
  10. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    That's a great tip yobuddy. A second set of eyes is very useful. On and off rituals are very important.
    boatpuller and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  11. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    And the quickest way to screw up.....is for somebody to be talking to you. Distracts the hell outta me!
    Adanac rider, Zubb, V4jones and 4 others like this.
  12. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Ear plugs
  13. wetwider

    wetwider Been here awhile

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    Tricepilot, I'm riding an 800cc standard for touring, sometimes cornering briskly, and a Super Sherpa in back-country. 'Might slide down a lonely highway, more likely off into the pucker-brush.

    I agree yobuddy, a second set of eyes is great so long as the mouth under `em stays shut until both lookers are finished looking. A written check-list is good, like we use flying. Also a dot of orange paint on fasteners where they mate to a case or whatever lets you see quickly if they're coming lose. Never-harden gasket sealer is great for vibrated threaded things you need to occasionally take apart - I use it instead of Loctite - partly because if roadside fixing, you can reassemble with the stuff still there and it still works.

    And vinegar is good for cleaning dentures... oh, that's another thread.
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  14. KevinP65

    KevinP65 Been here awhile

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    I don't get in a hurry and I stop after the first 15 min or so and get off and check everything again on the bike and me. It is kind of a pain but a couple of times I have been glad that I did before I was 200 miles down the road. I usually leave very early and if camping I check for stuff before dark in case I left something laying around that I might miss in the dark clearing out. It is easy to get sloppy after riding all day. Using a routine helps me avoid stupidity brought on by weariness. Sorta like staying hydrated and scarfing a little trail mix through the day which I discovered can really make a difference--especially as I have gotten older.
  15. Meritlane

    Meritlane Been here awhile

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    1-I have a small wallet (more like a change purse) on a chain that I use on long trips. It holds a bit of cash and the few necessary cards. I never disconnect it from my riding pants.

    2-Try never to put your phone down, anywhere, ever. There are times you must (in the toilet upon completion). I just keep repeating to myself “don’t forget the phone” over and over without distraction until it’s back in hand or pocket.

    3-I wear a monocle around my neck. Sure they call me Mr. peanut or monopoly guy but is been great for me. Gone is the hassle putting on reading glasses with a helmet for a quick check of a map. . The monocle is easy and can even be used without pulling your sunglasses off.
  16. Nomadmax

    Nomadmax Adventurer

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    Something I was told long ago:

    A mirror can only tell you "No", it can't tell you "Yes". Only a head check can do that.
  17. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    That's a good one! Also in the UK a 'turn signal' is called an 'indicator'...all it indicates is the bulb is working...the operator may or may not be turning. Don't rely on a turn signal as a YES or NO. It's just a maybe.
  18. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    My Dad said that a long time ago.
    This summer, because of that, I avoided getting slammed. I wait till the vehicle starts to turn before pulling out.
    Don't trust the bastards!!!!
  19. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Go's both ways. Here is a tip: Self cancelling turn signals or not......at intersections and exits to business's glance down at your turn signal to see if it is flashing.

    Here is an example...you are running down a four lane hill, two lanes each way. You come upon a right turn in to Home Depot.....a car is waiting to exit. All of a sudden he pulls out in front of you! Why? Because your right turn signal was flashing and he thought you were turning in before him. That signal has been on since your last right turn.


    Another example: you are enjoying a 'spirited run' down a snaking 2 lane....up way ahead you see a car signaling right.....as you approach they are pulling in the grass, their right turn signal still on. You figure they are stopping right? Next thing you know he swung a U turn right in front of you.

    Third example: Plus a rule 'NEVER overtake at an intersection.' So...you are minding your own business doing the 50 mph speed limit down a country 2 lane. Up ahead is a cross road 4 way intersection (with no light) you are VERY familiar with this road intersection, traffic does use it. You are on alert. Up ahead the pickup truck is signaling right.....you slow and slow and slow..you get up to him and figure "well I'll pass now" he hasn't quite turned right yet. Guess what? He turns left and you miss him by one inch and he goes behind you.....he was pumping his brakes and only the right brake light was working, he wasn't signaling at all!

    Lesson kids: DO NOT TAKE A TURN SIGNAL AS A SIGNAL TO DO ANYTHING....ALL YOU KNOW IS THE BULB IS WORKING>>>NOTHING ELSE.
  20. petertakov

    petertakov Been here awhile

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    Always have at least one ride between the last repair/maintenance and a long trip.