Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Interceptor

    Interceptor Adventurer

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    I've been a Paramedic for 27 years and in all that time I have never so much as used a medic alert bracelet while treating someone. Possibly a nurse in the emergency room would use this to find out who you are. A paramedic treating a a rider too seriously to speak simply will not have the time or inclination to load a flash drive.
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  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Rather than talk about what someone is doing with your protoplasm when you hit the road or scenery, take some time to reduce the possibility of it happening.

    I know there are equivalent tomes in American, but the one I have read, marked and inwardy digested is the UK traffic police "bible" Roadcraft.
    Completely useless for you as we drive on the other side of the road, but it is about defensive driving (it was originally written for police patrol\pursuit drivers) later addenda added bikes. It has been constantly under review since its first edition many years ago.

    The main tenet is "Defensive Riding", being aware of all vehicles around you - even those you may not be able to see, but could be there, because they are out to kill you. It requires lots of concentration, especially at first.
    The basics are observation and road positioning to maximise your sightlines, not riding beyond your visibility, but at the same time "making progress" ie speeding.
    Just in case you got to thinking it was was going to make you slower.

    Stuff which may be alien to some are filtering aka lane spliting, which is something they advocate you should be doing - but not necessarily at elevated mph - but it is all down to the circumstances, not a Bill of "I'm-on-a-bad-ass-bike-so-I-can-do-what-I-like" Rights.
    Riding a bike brings no entitlements, except a trip to A&E or the morgue if you ignore the warning signs.

    Quite a few Police Class 1, the top of the tree boys, take the time - their own free time, unpaid - to share their skills and knowledge through a couple of schemes that I know of.
    Usually a series of one on one, pursuit and debrief sessions. Leading, if you want, to being independantly tested up to the Class 1 standard. Again a 1 hour pursuit and debrief, some in town, some out on highway and some out in the countryside, with high hedges, cow shit, tractors, blind corners, oncoming traffic and lots of things to hit.

    You don't of course have to wait for an English Bobby on a bike to come along.
    upload_2017-7-24_21-12-20.jpeg
    It's your life and body, look after it
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  3. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Velocette LE on the left. Water cooled...way before it's time.

    Great thread guys. Lots of really useful information.
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  4. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Also shaft driven - if "driven" with that power level is the correct word.
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  5. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Yeah, you could race them on a push bike...I did.........
  6. XTremeRide

    XTremeRide Ole Soldier

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    Had a career in the military - light fighter (everything on my back). Same at every stop: spectacles, testicles, wallet, and watch. Same on the bike, but check the gas cap. And gloves. And locking the damned pannier lids. :lol3
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  7. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    I think I've lost everything on your list except the testies.
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  8. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

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    I'm a paramedic. First, I should tell you that I have received no specific training with regard to medical information on thumb drives, or searching for this information on cell phones. I'd advise you to use the KISS principle, and keep it low tech. We will absolutely look for your wallet in the obvious places. If your emergency info is alongside your driver's license, we'll find it there. If you want to use a dog tag or a bracelet with that info, that works. Please don't expect a lot of time to be spent checking for this stuff if you're incapacitated. If the crew is good, they'll be on their way to the trauma center tout suite, and they will be busy.

    Best,

    Paul
  9. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    What about the "emergency" pocket on some riding coats, it has a star-like pattern sewn on it. On my Klim it is on the left sleeve near the wrist. Do 1stR's actually look for that or in there?
  10. ProLeisure

    ProLeisure Gimme shelter...

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    Regarding medical ID info, I made cards for my wife and I using a business card template. One side has medical and contact information and the other side has ‘ICE’ in big, bold red letters:

    Business Card Template:
    http://www.avery.com/avery/en_us/Templates-&-Software/Templates/Cards/Business-Cards/_/template-types-blank/applications-microsoft-word/?N=4294963735+4294965751+4294965754&allref=1

    Then I put the cards in some of these:

    Adhesive Card Holder:
    https://www.amazon.com/C-Line-Self-...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=KQRG89GTB2NZRBF8V9B9

    I carry one in my wallet, one in my ‘Medical ID’ pocket on my jacket, etc. I also put one in my pocket when I go mountain biking or skiing.

    I recently posted this in another thread, but here’s another place to store your ‘Medical ID’ info.

    On an iPhone, (and I’m sure other smart phones have a similar feature), you can make your ICE information easily available to others without having to use TouchID or them knowing your phone's password.

    1. Go to the Health app on your iPhone
    2. In the lower righthand corner there’s a ‘Medical ID’ icon
    3. Fill in the ICE contact info

    Now, anyone can access the information when the following screen comes up by touching ‘Emergency’ in the lower lefthand corner:

    [​IMG]


    The following screen will come up, touch ‘Medical ID’ and it will show the medical info you entered in the Health app:

    [​IMG]
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  11. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

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    Boatpuller- I have the same type jacket. Yes, I would look there. Here's the thing though: this stuff just isn't part of the training curriculum, so we who work in the field just do what's quick and sensible. We always look for a DL, so nested with your license is the best option. It's just paper; easy to put it both places, right?
  12. ProLeisure

    ProLeisure Gimme shelter...

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    Even in our absurdly litigious society I can't imagine someone being sued for looking for medical contact info on someone's phone who's incapacitated due to injury.

    I've heard a few ER nurses state that looking on a person's phone is one place they look for 'Medical ID' info if they can't find it other places and I want to make it as easy as possible for someone to find that info if needed.

    My 'Medical ID' info on my phone only contains my wife's phone number and states that I'm an organ donor.
  13. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

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    I understand your concern. The law has been written to protect people who are trying their best to help in time of need. Look up Good Samaritan laws; they may vary from state to state. Anything is possible, but I wouldn't hesitate, in uniform or not, to do what is reasonable and necessary. If you don't feel comfortable opening up a phone, just leave that to the responders. If you stop traffic, give an accurate report of the accident location, immobilize the rider (avoid movement) and try to stop any serious bleeding, you're a legend in my book.
  14. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

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    Go ahead and be afraid, just stand back, stay out of the way, and let we who by our nature have to help, do what we can. That's what most people do anyway.
  15. Johnny4x4

    Johnny4x4 Hope 2 B Cool Sumday

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    So, here is my $0.02.

    I was a bit inconsistent about which pocket I put my keys in. when I go to the bike I am always checking all my pockets. I had stopped at a store in Alaska to buy some Ice and some Soda for my cooler, I pulled my cooler off the bike, put my items in and replaced it on the bike. went to look for my keys and couldn't find them, felt around in every pocket on my riding jacket, my riding pants, checked the ground around the bike a few times, went back into the store and asked if anyone had turned in some keys, walked up and down every isle I had been in, checked up front again about anyone turning them in. no dice. so I got out the emergency key I keep on the bike and rode to the campground. as I was unloading the bike, I found the keys under the cooler on top of the bags. after that I put my keys on a clip attached to the bottom of my jacket.

    next tip, Always carry your cell phone charger in your riding gear. I have a charging setup on my bike, but after awhile the little end that hooks to the phone gets worn out, when I plugged it in, it made the little charging sound, but when I put it in the bag, the cord moved a little to the side and was not charging. got to a restaurant and went to use, it was dead. luckily I had my home charger in my riding pants pocket so I could use and charge while eating.

    Also, make sure you put the charger back in the same pocket, I thought I had done this, but at my next destination I couldn't find it. checked all my pockets, tank bag, no dice. Found it later when I got undressed, I had put it in the vent area right in front of my pocket. it had slid down and was in the pantleg all day.
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  16. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    Yep. As I mentioned here 2 years ago, police your pockets. Every time.
  17. Buckee

    Buckee Scott

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    When stopped by the law for anything (permit check, performance award, whatever), always always get the helmet off before conversing. I have seen radical changes in demeanor as soon as the gray hair is visible.

    Also works when meeting non-riders on the trail - given the bikes and gear we wear off-road, it's assumed you're a jerkoff kid until the gray shows.

    And some horse people told me - if you stop to let them ride past you, take the helmet off, more important than shutting the bike off. They've heard engines before, but they don't know what the heck you are when you look like a storm trooper.
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  18. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    I take the opposite tack. I'll ride past equestrians, slowly, but I never stop. Horses are large and unpredictable animals -- not intelligent enough to run out of a burning barn -- and limiting my proximity to them is one of my General Orders.

    The foregoing is only reinforced by the dagger-like stares that the horsie set always sends our way, no matter how slowly and quietly we've ridden by them on a shared use trail. I grant that some twats on undermuffled bikes might have flown past in a reckless manner, but their sins aren't mine and I refuse to share the burden.

    Let the horse people hope that I'll stop and remove my helmet. That's not going to happen.
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