Best way to carry extra water?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Janus9, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    For on the go drinking water I take a water bladder in a small backpack, but need to carry extra water for camping. (drinking, cooking, cleaning etc...)

    I like to camp, wild camp mostly right off the trail at the end of the day, so lots of times there isn't water available. I figure if I could carry a gallon of water that would work. I only need one days worth of water, would refill daily.


    A 1g rotopax water container would work, or maybe some type of bladder, or a few containers.....

    Not sure.

    What do you guys use or recommend?

    This is for a TAT trip and other future BDR trips.
    #1
  2. Trikeflyer jj

    Trikeflyer jj Adventurer

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    MSR Dromedary Bag
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  3. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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    Yep. Easy to fill. Put it In a bag or strap it to a rack. Takes up little space when not in use.
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  4. RVDan

    RVDan Long timer

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    Bladders are best if you have luggage because they will conform to odd shape spaces.

    If you don’t have luggage you’re stuck mounting a rotopax or similar.

    I’ve got a PVC pipe with a couple caps on it that holds two bottles of water strapped to my rear subframe. Was supposed to be a tool tube but I never got around to putting the tools in it.
    #4
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  5. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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    The cheap way is a mylar coffee bladder. It has a coffee taste for a while, and eventally the cap leaks, but they're easily replaced and fairlly durable.
    #5
  6. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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  7. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Camelbak. When not used it's full and in the freezer. Got cold drinking water all day. I may keep a 500ml size bottle of water in my tankbag.

    Depending on space I may bring extra in the trunk or top up camelbak when fueling. Last yr I got a water filtration unit for some backcountry kayaking, and thought it may be useful for riding and camping. But haven't felt the need to bring it yet.
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  8. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    IMHO the best way to carry extra water is with bladders.

    They are the the lightest and most compact system available.

    Lots of different bladders available these days.

    I feel it's best to use multiple smaller bladders, because:

    1 You can distrbute the load better.

    2 One big bladder could leak VS chance of multi bladder failure.

    I personally use the Sawyer brand of bladders .

    They are inexpensive (like 3 for $15 at REI) durable and are available in 0.5, 1, 2 liter sizes. I use a mix of 0.5 and 1 liter size.

    The Sawyer bladder is significantly lighter, more compact, and less expensive than the MSR dromaday.

    Light & Compact when empty is important, as you will often be riding with empty bladder, Especially if you carry a water filter, and are in areas with readily available camp water....when I ride in the mountains of Colorado ...mtn streams are everywhere. ..just a filter .... when in desert of Utah, full bladders, very little water to found.


    Scott
    #8
  9. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    It's heavy but I've put 2x 100oz Camelback bladders in my pack when dirt riding and I put two of them in my tank bag on the street bike when needed. .
    #9
  10. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the suggestions.

    Looks like some kind of bag system is the most flexible.

    I like the msr bags, but from reading reviews it seems like a lot complain of leaks from the cap and how the bag makes the water have a rubber/plastic taste.

    Lots of good reviews too, but not consistent.

    I’m going to go to rei and check things out.
    #10
  11. lacofdfireman

    lacofdfireman Long timer Supporter

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    Have you looked into the MotoJug Hydration System. Perfect for what your wanting to do. 1 gallon Coleman cooler will keep you having cold water to drink all day long. When you get to camp take it our of the bag and you have a super easy way to carry water for cooking, cleaning dishes or whatever you want. Also many different ways to mount it. It’s built to be installed on the rear passenger footpeg but I run mine on the rear of my pannier.

    Bladders are ok but won’t keep water cold near as long as an insulated cooler. Also they are harder to fill and clean.

    Here are a few pics of the MotoJug Hydration System installed on different bikes.

    IMG_3054.jpg

    IMG_3184.jpg

    IMG_2204.jpg

    IMG_3092.jpg

    IMG_0820.jpg
    #11
  12. DCrider

    DCrider Live from THE Hill

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  13. Aircooled6racer

    Aircooled6racer Been here awhile

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    I carry extra water in my Adventure Spec Magadan outside small pockets. I also use a half gallon Rtic insulated jug filled with ice and water in the large pocket. I carry two Smart Water 1 liter bottles in the small pockets. That gets me through 2 days and refill when I get a chance.
    #13
  14. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Satisfied Motojug owner for years:thumb:thumb

    JR356
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  15. molochnik

    molochnik Desperately wants the blue pill

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    Last multi-day trip, I used an older camelback bladder in the back bladder pocket of my jacket, a 3 liter bladder that came with my Fox Convoy backpack, and a couple of the soft square 2 quart military canteens that I packed low in my Giant Loop. The military canteens are handy with the covers you can sling across your back if you have to hike out. They also collapse flat and are pretty tough so they are easy to stuff anywhere.
    I'd use the bladder in my jacket until it was empty and then switch to my Fox bladder.
    I also used one of the legacy hard 1 quart canteens to carry some whiskey...for wound cleaning.
    #15
  16. Kingfish

    Kingfish Been here awhile

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    My low tech, inexpensive solution has been to use Arizona Tea 1gallon jugs. I usually pack one, solid construction, cap doesn't leak (I insure it stays upright) and pack around it in my pannier. Easy to pour from and I primarily use it for cooking & cleaning water. Easy to refill & if it gets damaged, cheap to replace. It will get me through about two days then I need to refill it. If space is a top concern, then this isn't the way to go. But if you have the room to spare, it's a convenient way to lug around some water.
    #16
  17. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    I wouldn't discount the likes of a 2 liter coke bottle either. Feather weight, rarely leak, tough as nails. There's no cool factor to them, but they work well. Yea, they're sorta bulky when empty, but it's not like it's hard to lash them on top of something.
    #17
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