Better Electrical Connections

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Hodakaguy, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider Supporter

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    If you are installing wiring on your bike consider these connectors. They are made for RC aircraft and are extremely reliable, easy to connect and disconnect, can take high loads and they are very solid. WAY better than the cheap automotive style connectors that you buy at napa, shucks, ect. I just installed my 200W Ricky Stator and used these connectors to replace the ones that came on the stator assy, wires going to the lights, switches, ect ect. When you are in the middle of know where it pays to have solid electrical connections.

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    These are the connectors, available at any Hobby Shop.


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    Here they are out of the bag. They are solder on connections.


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    Here is a 14 guage wire soldered onto the male connector.


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    Add the heat shrink tubing to prevent shorts.


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    Connect the two halves and your done. Nice solid connection that you won't have to worry about.


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    Here's a shot of my Ricky Stator harness with the new connectors installed on my XR650R.


    Hodakaguy
    #1
  2. Bruce Caldwell

    Bruce Caldwell Long timer

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    Those look pretty nice! I also like posi-lock connectors. Especially the posi-tap ones. So easy to tap into a wire.
    #2
  3. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    FYI, when soldering to gold plated components, it is critical to remove the gold from the solder area prior to soldering in your wire. This is typically done by tinning and wicking away the solder three times. Gold plating solders up nicely, but can will stress cracking in the solder joint under high vibration conditions. This is SOP for soldering in both MIL and NASA applications.
    #3
  4. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider Supporter

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    Good Info. I always tin the wire and the connector, never wicked it away though. No failures in RC flying so far.

    Thanks

    Hodakaguy
    #4
  5. the_gr8t_waldo

    the_gr8t_waldo Long timer

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    they look like a joy to work with, and the finished connection looks very professional too. but i wouldn't think that it would pass too much in the way of amps thru it. does the manf. state what loads it will handle?
    #5
  6. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider Supporter

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    I'm not sure what they are actually rated for, but they carry high amp loads in RC aircraft. My 48" wing will do 115mph in level flight and is pulling 45 amps at full load, using these same connections. There isn't any thing on my BRP that will pull even close to that, my 100W headlight is about 8.4amps at 12 volts.

    Hodakaguy
    #6
  7. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod I want to do right, but not right now

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    Nice find, I like those much more than crap automotive connections.
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  8. datol

    datol n00b and improved!

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    Those are good looking connectors, I like how compact they are.

    I am in the middle of redoing a DSK install on my BRP, I wanted to stay with the standard bullet style connectors, found out that Aerostich sells a kit for $17 that has these in a open barrel style crimp, even comes with the little clear plastic covers to make everything tiddy.

    http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/Electrical-Connector-Kit-p-20274.html

    Another type of connector I have used a bunch on cars is from these folks:

    http://www.weatherpack.com/

    These are the same as the fuel injection connections on all late model cars, and end up being pretty trick. I have used them on a complete car rewire, and they are a bit more work, and maybe a bit bulky for bike applications, but you end up with a water tight, factory quality connection.

    Dane
    #8
  9. Frank Warner

    Frank Warner Traveller

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    Any connection will last longer if you put a little grease on it to keep air/moisture away from the connection area.
    #9
  10. RandyB

    RandyB .

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    Put the NoAlOx to it. Available at the big box hardware stores. Great stuff.
    #10
  11. Jonex

    Jonex Long timer

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    Very cool stuff. I'm always interested in finding out about better connectors.

    I've heard from experts (whatever that means) in the aviation world that soldering can be a problem due to solder wicking up the wire under the insulation, making the end of the wire into a brittle stick that can break. I just don't like soldering - it's a pain, and I've had good luck with my connections so I haven't been motivated to do it yet. When I wired up the heated grips for my v-strom, I used generous amounts of shrink tubing and careful routing and I feel that I have a reliable set up, except I used the frame for a ground and I hear that's a no-no with Al frames.

    The Autozone where I live has some better crimp connectors with integrated shrink tubing. I've found that if I use channel locks to do the crimp instead of a crimping tool, I don't tear the connector's covering and I get a more controlled crimp. Maybe I need to find a better crimping tool.

    With Posilocs, I squirt silicone inside to seal them up.

    I used plain old automotive connectors and posilocs when I buried the wire for my dog's invisible fence, and it still worked fine even after 4 years, winter, frost heaving etc. buried only 3" deep under the sod. My 20 year old utility trailer is still working fine, too, even with the most hacked together wiring - blue crimp connectors and electrical tape.
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  12. Surfer

    Surfer Barley Adventurer

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    #12
  13. Guzz

    Guzz Gutless wonder

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    If you want another alternative connector (again from the RC community) try DEANS Ultra plugs.

    [​IMG]
    The industry standard in high performance connectors. Rated number one by R/C Car Action, The Ultra Plug actually has less resistance, including the solder joints, than an equivalent length piece of 12 gauge wire.


    We use them on LiPo batteries to the Electronic Speed Controlers/Battery Elimination Circuits (ESC/BEC). It's amazing how many AMP's these guys can handle, also how well they stay connected.

    True Deans, can be a bit expensive. So I order them from China (called T-Connectors) 10 pair T Connectors $6.95 HobbyKing/HobbyCity

    It takes a bit of skill/work to solder up, but well worth it :evil
    #13
  14. Tukata

    Tukata ADV Demo Rider

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    Yea my Dad runs 6.5KW through them
    But he's not normal in the RC world


    Sermos are also pretty good and relatively cheap and easy to solder
    #14
  15. bassguitar

    bassguitar Been here awhile

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    Yep. Nothing buy deans (or the cheaper versions) on all my RC Connections. Haven't had a use for them on the bike yet, but I've got it in the back of my mind to use them for sure.
    #15
  16. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

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    I'm concerned about any "slip" type connector for long term use. All it takes is some corrosion to occur under the shrinkwrap and you won't see it until it heats up. I have years of successful experience with heavy guage soldered and double shrinkwraped connections with no failures.....yet! I would love this type of connector for short term use, but not for hardwiring for lights, heating or any other longterm critical connections.....nothing worse than a wet weather open circuit that you cannot find in the rain, in the dark.
    #16
  17. basalt

    basalt Adventurer

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  18. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    The answer is VERY. In industry, they're used in high current applications that are subject to vibration. I've got them connecting my aux lights to the wiring harness of my GS, they've yet to show any hint of trouble after several years of exposure to the elements and the bike's vibrations.
    #18
  19. Crazy_Dave

    Crazy_Dave Back'in it in

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    Posi lock
    #19
  20. Tukata

    Tukata ADV Demo Rider

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    Those are what I was refering to as Sermos.
    I've run them pretty hard on my thumper in the woods. No problems.
    #20