Big Oil and Tree Hugger Junk-it to Tuk

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by DarkRider, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. Bugzy

    Bugzy 2014 VStrom DL1000a

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    That is interesting, I have the same thoughts when way up North, dirty, cold, tired of the slog of the routine, pack up the bike, brush, eat, find gas, eat, find gas, eat, find campsite, setup tent, pay the fees, brush, bed, then wake up next morning and do the same again, and repeat for 3 weeks. I usually swear to sell the bike and buy a boat or maybe some quads and a trailer, or just fly to Hawaii the next year and lay on the beach for 3 weeks. Then Winter comes, and by Spring I am craving a nice long ride again, missing it. I think it's like a drug, I need to feel the freedom, the solitude, the gravity, the acceleration, and hit a few corners at speed, just to get that counter-steer fix.
    #41
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  2. DarkRider

    DarkRider Curiously refreshing Supporter

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    Amen to that @Bugzy. It's definitely a drug for me. After about 300-400 miles, my mind has finished its "processing random thoughts" and I fully relax. I keep my 800cc of "Xanax" in the garage and self-medicate as needed.
    #42
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  3. DarkRider

    DarkRider Curiously refreshing Supporter

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    Day 9/10:

    Well, having just re-read @selkins post and feeling utterly despondent, I'll throw in my 2c...and my recount of our time in Eagle Plains and getting out. We did indeed wake to ice and snow and a road closed heading north, and I did spend the day groveling with the front desk lady (I wish I could remember her name) to let us keep our room one more night. There were moments when I thought I was going to have to prostitute myself to her just to get her to let us keep our room one more night given that the motel was sold out. Fortunately for me, the sign I recently saw on a homeless guy in Austin applied to my situation..."I'm too ugly to prostitute...too old to care." I'm sure she had more suitable, and similarly screwed, young bucks to choose from, so I was left to avoid our room at all costs as @selkins hacked up every germ he'd ingested with the toe.

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    The next morning, we woke to improving road conditions and headed south. The first leg to Ogilve Ridge overlook was dicey, with long stretches of mud and the remainder being the usual wrist-pounding potholes. We pulled into the overlook for some pictures, and after snapping a few, I noticed something odd about my bike.

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    @selkins throwing the hail mary...my bike conspicuously (other than to a rattled rider like me) missing something important in the background:

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    It was only after going to swap lenses from the topper on my right pannier...and realizing that the entire pannier was missing, that I realized that something was amiss. It was about at that moment that a road maintenance guy pulled up in a pickup, hopped out, grabbed my pannier out of the back, and asked if I was missing something. Apparently with all the jarring on the way up, the internal screws that hold the Touratech pannier in place had come lose, and on the ride south from Eagle Plains, the final beating had caused the entire thing to fall off. I gratefully accepted the gift, reattached the pannier, and we headed south.

    The rest of the journey back to Dawson was a mixture of continued freezing temps, intermittent rain/mist, and stunning photo opportunities.

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    I could've spent a week taking photos on the trip back and never could have adequately captured the beauty of the place. The fall colors mixed with snow and intermittent low cloud cover was as beautiful a setting as I'll probably ever see.

    We stopped at the end of the Dempster, got a few "money shots" to prove we'd survived, and headed back into Dawson.

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    On returning to Dawson, the full extent of @selkins illness became clear, so I arranged lodging, we dumped our gear, and I gave a "wide berth" to allow @selkins to recover some of his energy before dinner. I of course had to follow my "health regimen" so I took my camera, grabbed a quick picture of the evidence on my bike of the ride south, and retreated to a nearby watering hole for a celebratory beverage.

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    #43
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  4. Uncle Evil

    Uncle Evil Island Boy

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    You two had an adventure to remember .
    I remember getting a little ill from the 'toe cocktail myself ,
    or it might have been the 20 other cocktails ….:drink
    Love the drone footage !
    Really gives an idea of the vastness up there .
    #44
  5. Bugzy

    Bugzy 2014 VStrom DL1000a

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    Amazing pictures, you really hit that one on the perfect day.
    #45
  6. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    Okay, I'm ahead of @DarkRider, but time waits for no one, and I've still got lots of content for this report, though his ride would be concluding soon.

    September 5th I woke up and gauged myself at about 65-70% - a hell of a lot better than yesterday's 30-40%. DarkRider has the barn in his sights now, and pushed his flight up a couple of days, which means we've got two days to get to Anchorage. Not a problem.

    Who doesn't love a good ferry?

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    We boarded the free, 24-hour ferry across the Yukon, which isn't a big deal and I wouldn't mention it except for the fact that if I don't, DarkRider doubtless will... Because, as the ferry turned into the current it lurched a bit and my bike dropped. Is there anything quite as embarrassing? The ferry workers were nothing but sympathetic smiles and good will as they came to offer help, but in the surge of shame and adrenaline, I quickly popped it back up on my own.

    As you can see from the gif, the skies were brightening to the west. It was a mix of sun and overcast, but the colors made for a stand-out day on the Top of the World Highway.

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    I was mostly enjoying the drone. I can be obsessive at times (and I ride an R1200GSA, go figure), but I'd generally rather focus on the experience than on recording it. Still, as I grow older and appreciate how much fun memory an old photo can evoke, it makes me a bit more interested in "capturing" some piece of the experience. And simply as an excuse to get off the bike and linger in some amazing spaces, it works pretty well.

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    All of that said, drone technology isn't perfect. I've read plenty of horror stories of drones suddenly dropping connection and falling to their doom as the hapless owner looks on. And there were times I was going for a shot and thinking to myself, "Self, if that thing bugs out now you're losing about a week's worth of irreplaceable shots." I was spared that experience, but I wasn't spared the, dare I say, homicidal side of certain drones?

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    Little f***er gave me its best shot. And really, no idea why that happened. Klim could note in their marketing materials: "Useful in the event of drone attack."

    So, up and over to Chicken for the obligatory stop. It was a slow, late season day as we pulled in. The temps hadn't gotten above the low 40s since we had crossed into the Yukon, and even with multiple layers and a windshell beneath, the Klim Latitude jacket was just too lightweight to keep the cold at bay. So, I popped into the cafe for some hot food. I order the chicken pot pie, and the woman doing the bookkeeping in the back calls out, "It'll be the best you ever had!"

    Meanwhile, the guy doing the cooking talks caribou hunting and how poor it's been in recent years. "The herd crossed the Yukon and mixed with the Porcupine herd a few years ago and it's been all screwy since then. The season here starts August 12th, but they all moved through in July this year. I go out every chance I get, but I still haven't gotten one." He and the woman in back maintain an easy-going stop and go conversation about whatever is on their minds. They welcome into the conversational flow whomever walks in the door, trading gossip, sharing local insights. This is what it means when someone says they were "treated like family," I think.

    The chicken pot pie was great.

    Trying to avoid another rebound, I had thought to limit the day to Tok; but by the time we arrived there I had caught a second wind. As we gassed up there, an older local guy in a pickup clues us in on sketchy road conditions to the south - frost heaves and rough tarmac. He also mentioned that just a couple of days prior there had been a tragic accident involving motorcycles and others near Denali, with several deaths. The accident was all over the news and had many people more aware than normal - several people would go out of their way in coming days to wish me well and "be safe."

    I didn't know to expect the drama of the glacier capped peaks of Wrangell-St Elias to our east that evening. I point off at a breathtaking view and DarkRider asks over the Sena, "Is that Denali?" It matches what my expectation of Denali would be, but no, it's just another example of the superlatives of Alaska scenery. Not much later, my stamina runs out at Glenallen and we grabbed a room at the Caribou Inn and crash early.

    Happily, the next morning I'm feeling as good or better than the morning prior. For the first time on this trip I'm seeing completely new sites, and I'm grateful to be able to appreciate them with a clear head.

    The ride down to Anchorage is amazing. My favorite road in the world is the A82 through Glen Coe in Scotland. For me, nothing beats the drama of that particular place. But a stretch of that highway around Glacier View and the Matanuska River was the first time I've seen a place outside Scotland that evoked Glen Coe so well. And a glacier to boot!

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    It rained a good part of the day, but we made it down to Anchorage by mid-afternoon. So we checked into a hotel south of downtown, had a great late lunch/early dinner at Moose's Tooth (great, creative pizza and beer), and then after a hug and good wishes, DarkRider was off.

    There were plenty of hours left in the day, but it was time to focus on recuperation. So I settled in to do some laundry, take a long, hot shower, and make some progress on my reading material for this trip.

    After a while I flipped on the teevee and stumbled on the Andy Kaufman biopic "Man on the Moon." What a crazy, iconoclastic, brilliant bastard. I'm glad the world is able to make space for someone so entirely off the wall.

    DarkRider's final day in Alaska

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    #46
  7. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    As Darkrider was arriving home in Texas after his red-eye flight, I was still sound asleep in Anchorage. "Man on the Moon" had me up later than I would have expected, but the dark curtains let me sleep well into the morning. I was feeling close to 100%, and the day's forecast was perfect for a ride around the Kenai Peninsula.

    @DarkRider is an easy riding partner, but with no riding partner I could follow every whim. So, I simply turned the bike south and took whichever turns looked most interesting. I wound up in Seward, but only after 130 miles of glacier-crusted mountain peaks, vivid blue-green rivers and lakes, and as a bonus, three moose calumphing across the Seward Hwy about 100 yards in front of me. It looks like a HUGE momma and a couple of big-enough calves. And despite the size, no sooner are they in the underbrush but they disappear entirely.

    Heading south and east out of Anchorage on AK-1.

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    A ways toward the road I came across a little roadside pullout with a fantastic, peaceful little river. Great time to pull out the drone.

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    And then more of the Seward Highway.

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    Seward itself was a fine little town with a busy harbor and seals that would pop their heads up unpredictably, sea otters floating around on their backs and bald eagles flying over head. It made for a memorable lunch, though with my head bobbing all around it was difficult to pay much attention to eating the sandwich.
    #47
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  8. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    Okay, it's embarrassing, but I'll own a bit of personal satisfaction when strangers come up and acknowledge what I expect many of us want to hear. Yeah, what matters and makes an impact is in the ride itself, but there's nothing wrong with external validation. By the end of the day's ride to Seward, and despite the previous day's rain, my bike was still caked with mud from our adventures further north. As I pulled up outside the Anchorage hotel a couple of women were having a smoke outside. They scanned the bike and one of them strolled over to me as I pulled off my helmet. "You look like you're stepping out of The Walking Dead. All ready for the zombie apocolypse. It's awesome!" I just smile and say, "Thanks."

    The next morning it was time to make a decision. North to Denali or east to McCarthy was my dilemma. I figured there was no way to go wrong in either direction, but with the other things I wanted to do yet this trip, I didn't feel I could do both. Sitting here six months later I'm wondering what the other path would have revealed, but life is a series of choices. And on this day the forecast to the north was for clear skies, which meant the rare possibility of seeing Denali's summit. So, north it would be.

    The ride from Anchorage to Wasilla is that small corner of Alaska that feels much like the lower 48. Urban center, suburban expanse. The early miles of AK Hwy 3 are a depressing line of strip malls and chain stores of all description. But Alaska is big, and the sprawl is soon left behind.

    If you've ever ridden toward the Rockies from the east, or the Sierra Nevada range from the west, you'll likely recognize that impatience to see the mountains come into clear view. The flats go on and on, and as the miles tick down you start wondering "where are the mountains?" Fifty miles, forty, and still it's just a pale haze in the distance - till those faint outlines like distant cloud lines become more defined, and the next thing you know, there they are. That's what I expected with Denali. Instead, just as the road started veering north shortly after Wasilla, well over 100 miles away, there it was. Easily the most prominent point on the horizon whenever the trees on the side of the road parted. And even 100 miles away it was breathtaking.

    And, it's one of those things you can't easily capture in a picture. I did pull over at the southern overlook at Denali State Park for some footage, but here you're still forty miles away (where the Rockies would just start to materialize from the haze) and nothing like the impact that leads tourists from overseas to gawk and snap endless selfies (likely as underwhelming as my footage).

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    As Denali slowly shifted out of my field of view that day, it continued to dominate the horizon to the south, and would do so for the next full day or so. I count myself lucky to have had such a great day for the view.

    There are a lot of contrasts for the ride from Anchorage to Fairbanks. From Wasilla to Denali State Park it's long, flat straight-aways along the Sustina River. From there the road shifts to gentle sweepers and closer mountain views to the east north and west that gradually close in as you approach and ride through the eastern tip of the National Park.

    Near Cantwell I stumbled on one of those roadside oddities that pepper remote roads throughout the U.S., the igloo hotel.

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    I always think about the folks who embarked on constructing places like this. The optimism and energy they must have brought to the idea and execution. And the slowly eroding dream as things don't work out. We're a nation of idealists and creatives.

    Anyway, once past the mountain range, the road led to some more long straightaways, but this time punctuated again by the bright colors of fall.

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    In the gif below, that's Denali in the left fifth of the frame - continuing to dominate the southern horizon.

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    AK Hwy 3 crosses the Tenana River about half way from the park to Fairbanks, and enters a range of conifer-covered hills, the road dipping up, down and around for a few dozen miles before entering the outskirts of Fairbanks.

    I scooted downtown, in search of a stretch of walkable area, and found it along the Chena River right at downtown. I had dinner at Big Daddy's BBQ and got weirdly into the televised Texas A&M / Clemson football game showing on the screen. Afterwards a stroll along the Chena and through the short stretch of downtown pedestrian mall. I stopped by Big Ray's to pick up some bear spray before heading back to my room for the night. After a long stretch of hotels I was looking forward to some nights of camping.
    #48
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  9. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

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    Great update! Whatever happened to whatshisname?

    :hide
    #49
  10. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    @DarkRider flew out of Anchorage the day we rode into town. Big Oil = Small Vacation.

    And - he's a busier guy than me. We'll just have to see if he's willing to spend the time to share some pics and story of his last couple of days in the north country.
    #50
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  11. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

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    I was joking.... But thanks for the update.
    #51
  12. DarkRider

    DarkRider Curiously refreshing Supporter

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    Ouch...ya I was going to add the last of my pics and prose but being outdoors in mountains wearing a backpack trumped keeping up with @selkins last weekend. Besides - after my side-case slide on the Dempster, photos lacked the extra lens options. I’ve got a few more to add...soon.
    #52
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  13. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    I woke up the morning of Sept 9 warm and comfortable in my hotel bed on the banks of the Chena River in Fairbanks. The illness was well past now. I was at the top of the Alaska Highway, thousands of miles from home with no itinerary and a couple of weeks of available time.

    Where to go?

    A part of me was interested in heading up the Haul Road to Prudhoe and Deadhorse. I hadn't yet been up that way. But honestly, visiting an oil field didn't appeal that much. And whether it's hiking, riding, or pretty much anything else, I'd rather take the loop than the out-and-back. Novelty wins the day.

    So instead I'd head south and east. I'd passed the southern terminus of the Canol Road at Johnson's Crossing a few times, and had been itching to head up that route for a long time. This time I'd do it.

    The ride from Fairbanks to Tok is a series of long, plumb line straightaways along the broad, flat Tanana River valley. Much of the way feels as uniform and featureless as the central plains.

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    Still, to Delta Junction and beyond, all I had to do is pull over and gaze off to the south and west to see Denali continue to dominate the skyline. I got lucky, indeed, with the weather.

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    I pulled into a gas station in Tok and was greeted by a caravan of RVs filled with couples in their 30s and 40s. One pulls a homemade, portable hot tub on a trailer - fully operational.

    A woman from one of the RVs walks up and starts asking the usual questions. She then tells me they're returning to Anchorage after running the annual relay race from Skagway to Whitehorse. Sounds like a fun time, and they're all pretty jacked up and enthused. Apparently the one team kept the hot tub running and in tow throughout the relay, so its members could relax between their segments.

    The tourist infrastructure is shutting down, and outside of the relay participants, the RVs are few. I've seen a few day-riders, but no long-haul motorcyclist since @DarkRider and I rode into Anchorage. I'm reminded again what a treat it is to be here at the tail end of the season. After crossing back into the Yukon at Beaver Creek I pull over for a BLT and salad at Buckshot Betty's. It's a slow afternoon, and the couple working the restaurant have that settling-in air that I imagine follows the end of the months-long tourist rush.

    The road south and east of Beaver Creek is a complete contrast to the first part of the day. The steep ramparts of the Kluane Range come into view, and the curves and twists of the road reveal new vistas and surprises in rapid succession.

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    Passing Destruction Bay the day was winding down. As the equinox neared, daylight was dwindling in the far north. In the ten days since DarkRider and I had ridden into Whitehorse, the length of daylight had shrunk by an hour. I pulled into Congdon Creek Campground on the shores of Kluane Lake. Again the late season was showing, with just a few scattered RVs in the pull-ins. The tenting section is cordoned off with bear-proof, electrified fence, with picnic tables and firepits positioned outside the perimeter.

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    The campground is ideal, positioned right on the lake and surrounded by mountains that are wreathed in fall colors and frosted with snow. The wood in my fire pit that night burns like an oiled torch and snaps like pop-rocks. A couple of other tenters show up. An older German man, solo tripping around, "I come to the US for two weeks at a time at least three times a year," he tells me. When I share my home state, he responds warmly, "I know Minnesota! Lake Bemidji, Voyageurs, Minneapolis!"

    Later, I chat with a young man, an Anchorage native. He's never been this far from home before, but he's going much further. He's picked up a new job as a radar technicion, and is relocating all the way to Huntsville, AL. I imagine now the adventures and novelty he's had in the months since we chatted by the fire on Kluane Lake.

    The night was clear and dark with a new moon and countless stars peeking between the scattered clouds above.
    #53
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  14. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    Ha! Yeah, obviously I can relate, Bugsy. Though it's never hit me quite as sharply as it did this trip. That said, it's been more than 20 years since I went for the tropical beach vacation. Once you've gotten the taste for, as you so well put, "the freedom, the solitude, the gravity, the acceleration..." it's tough to shake.
    #54
  15. DarkRider

    DarkRider Curiously refreshing Supporter

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    Ok, I officially suck. @selkins has again lapped me, so I'm going to get the last of my contribution up and sulk back into my man cave.

    Day 11 - Dawson to Glennallen

    As mentioned before, the pannier get-off on the Dempster caused some subsequent issues with photos. I had 2 very nice lenses (one wide-angle...one long-range) on the pannier topper, and while both survived the slide across the Dempster, the zipper on the Enduristan case was damaged, leaving me unable to access them. Thus, I was left with a very nice, but not terribly great, 45mm lens on my camera for Top of the World Highway and the trip down to Anchorage. That said, here are a few from the trip from Dawson down to Glennallen.

    Top of the world (fall colors at their best...and the end of @slkins drone lol):
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    A lot of immigration issues here I'd imagine...

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    Nothing like a stop in Chicken
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    Would have been nice to try a few of these delicacies in Chicken but we had miles to go
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    I was bummed not being able to swap lenses, but lets face it - you can't really capture this kind of beauty with a camera
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    We arrived in Glennallen after some gnarly roads, a bolt on my bike that was incessantly coming out the whole day (not sure if my side crash bars would've fallen off had it come out the whole way - I'd already lost another bolt on the Dempster and my windscreen was zip-tied to my bike), and rested up for the last leg into Anchorage. @selkins captured that day perfectly, so I'll finish off my meager contribution to this RR with one last photo, and a suggestion.

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    If anyone wants to read my last post, go to page one and read my post from the Anchorage airport. Thanks @selkins for guilting me into committing to this 2 years in advance, for prodding me to get out and see new and beautiful places, and for putting up with me being a "concerned parent" and forcing us to go south when all I was worried about was where the med-jet would land on the Dempster if your illness went south.

    And for the record, @selkins was convinced he was selling his bike after our trip. He had it all polished and listed on ADVrider...in late September. My only comment was "trying to sell a bike late season in Minnesota is like trying to sell a snowmobile in Phoenix in May"...the 2-wheel life gets in your blood. Hopefully it never leaves.

    Ok @selkins, I return the floor to you. See you in Scotland for more 2-wheel antics in September!
    #55
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  16. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    Oh @DarkRider , it's like you're inviting me to dis your Triumph...

    The good news is we'll both be on rented beemers for riding the Highlands. That, my friend, is going to be a hoot!
    #56
  17. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

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    Where is the rental agency?
    #57
  18. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

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    The enclosed tent space at Congdon Creek Campground got a burst of new folks as the sun set - probably a half dozen different tents, though the lightly wooded area gave a reasonable sense of separation. I'm in no rush in the morning, and by the time I'm out of the tent at 8am most folks are packed and gone. I head down to the lakeside and brew up my standard camping breakfast of oatmeal and coffee and enjoy the tranquility.

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    If there is a heaven, I expect lots of mornings like this if I'm able to sneak my way in. There's a chill in the air, but well above freezing; and with the morning light, blue skies, surrounding mountains, gently lapping waves and the overwhelming quiet - really, what's not to like?

    There are some great ride reports out there from serious road warriors like this one by @Gone_Ridin that I enjoy the heck out of reading. And I know I'd be the shittiest possible riding partner for those folks. I want to savor each moment of peace and quiet at least as much as I want to experience the ride. Which is just a long way of saying I didn't hit the road until about 10:30am because...why rush it?

    From Congdon Creek it was a quick but scenic ride over the Haines Junction. If you look on google maps you'll see that you cross over Kluane Lake on a bit of the AK Hwy. Now switch to satellite view and you'll see that blue space has shrunk quite a bit (witness the dry lake bed in the gif).

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    Why the drying lake? River piracy. Which sounds awesome, but is really something very different and not nearly so cool as my own image of swashbuckling river buccaneers...

    Anyhoozle. From Haines Junction through to Whitehorse I closed one of the last gaps in my AK Hwy experience - having done the Skagway-Haines detour when I was here in 2012. The Yukon is rich in First Nations culture, and much of this route follows forested valley lands of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. I love to travel, but I'm always feeling this nagging sense of scratching a bare surface of a rich place. One of these days I'd love to do a trip up here that delves into the deep human history and culture of the place. For everything I gain in a morning's ride through a beautiful valley like this, there is so much more that I'm missing...

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    It's nice to be back in Whitehorse. I replenish my oatmeal supply, and have an avocado BLT at Burnt Toast Cafe. I want to linger here, but the greater pull is the South Canol. So I head south out of town. The Robert Service Campground, where I stayed in 2012, is already shut down for the season. And then I'm covering ground that DarkRider and I traversed a week and a half ago before filling up the bike at Johnson's Crossing Lodge, crossing the river, and then peeling off at the base of the Canol Road.

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    I started off my 2012 ride report with a memory from my youth - talking about how inspired I was by this 1960s movie - Challenging the Northwest Territory. I rediscovered the movie a few years ago, and rewatched it. There's nothing quite like the films that Gordon Eastman made in the late 60s and early 70s. And this one followed a trek he made along the length of the Canol Road and then up into the Mackenzie Mountains. I highly recommend it. Eastman's trip up the South Canol (in a station wagon) was on my mind as I started up the road.

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    It was a beautiful late afternoon ride. Unlike the Dempster, or the Top of the World Hwy, the Canol is maintained with local traffic in mind. Narrow, often hemmed in by foliage, and well-maintained, but not for the kind of traffic you'll see on the Dempster. I wouldn't say it's a better experience, but it is a more remote one.

    [​IMG]

    What traffic there was were Yukon plates, often towing a boat or a trailer with an ATV or two. My goal for the night was just a little ways up, at a forested camping loop at the southern edge of Quiet Lake. The campground had two or three RVs, but the sites are well separated, and folks had staked out locations that seemed focused on keeping distance from one another.

    [​IMG]

    I got the tent up, cooked some dinner, and was settled in by the fire with a cup of tea as the sun went down. I took a quiet walk down to the lakeside to fill up my water bottles for the night. There was a sharp breeze off the lake, the temps were quickly dropping, and just one evening past the new moon with trees crowding the sky, it was dark as pitch. The few other residents kept quiet and to themselves, and a sign at the registration kiosk noted that the campground would not be serviced again until May. Walking back to the campsite in the dark, the thick trees muted the wind. I felt very much alone, conscious of the sound of each footstep and rustle.
    #58
  19. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,018
    Location:
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Loving your RR. Thank you!
    #59
  20. selkins

    selkins Gotta light?

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,680
    Location:
    The Frozen North
    Thanks, joenuclear!

    And the rental agency we're using in Scotland is this one. They've been great to deal with thusfar.
    #60
    joenuclear likes this.