BMW G310GS Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Eddy Alvarez, Apr 22, 2016.

  1. cvx5832

    cvx5832 n00b

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2021
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    CA
    Thank you, FreeTheBeast. Question on the M20 (3). In the top of the instructions it specifies 15Nm, then 11Nm. Then to the bottom it specifies. 38Nm. Am I understanding this correctly or is there another M20 beneath the M20 that's pictured?

    Thanks for posting this technical info!
  2. cvx5832

    cvx5832 n00b

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2021
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    CA
    I think I just got it. It's tightened after the other clamps are secured, hence not tightening the thrust bearing any more than necessary.

    Thanks!
  3. Old and slow

    Old and slow my bike is old and slow, not me!

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,468
    Location:
    Republic of Vermont
    FYI...today I got at least 10 more miles beyond the point where the range zeroed out on the display, and then it took 2.7 gallons to fill. Miles between fills = 204

    And Monday this week I got to one mile left on the range, then it took 2.6 gallons to fill. Miles between fills = 205

    Note: the term "fill" is subjective....I aim to just cover the horizontal "stick" in the filler neck.
    Izzy58 likes this.
  4. Izzy58

    Izzy58 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2015
    Oddometer:
    440
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Thanks for posting this. Every time the low fuel light comes on and it show miles remaining I wonder if there are any miles past the zero mark.
    Old and slow likes this.
  5. Liberty4Ever

    Liberty4Ever More Gelände... Less Straße

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Central Kentucky, USA
    Not sure I'd trust the results to be repeatable. I've read that the range estimates aren't very accurate because they rely on terrain and riding style. Coast down a steep hill at 45 MPH and my instantaneous fuel consumption shows 199 MPG.

    On the plus side, the display switches to RANGE when the reserve warning light is illuminated, and there's maybe 50 miles of estimated range remaining. You'd need to be a goober to accidentally run out... which I almost did. :-o

    On my first tank, I was farther from civilization than I planned and was genuinely concerned that I'd need to knock on a farmer's door and buy a gallon of gas. I made it back with six miles of estimated range remaining, and that was actually a very accurate estimate. I put almost the entire 2.9 gallons in the tank.

    BMW-G310GS-SwitzerCoveredBridge-20210407_195354-SixMileRemainingRageAtFirstFillUp.jpg

    The 2.9 gallon fuel tank is the feature I'd most like to change. No ADV bike, not even an efficient high MPG 313cc bike should have an 11 liter tank. It should have at least twice that capacity. Even if I'm not riding any farther than that at a single sitting before I'm ready to stop for fuel, what about commuters? The G310GS is a great commuter bike. I'd like to put 6+ gallons in it and not need to stop every few days for gas.
  6. Gillard of Oz

    Gillard of Oz n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2021
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Hello everyone, I'm joining the asylum on Wed next week. I'm based in Melbourne, AU..
    I bought a late 2018, 310GS with 430km on the clock. The first owner sold the back to the dealer, so still not broken in.
    I'm a total nob and really enjoying the discussion and already have multiple parts on order.

    My first question, how do you search the tread? is there an option to search the tread from within the forum? for example, 'windshield clip' or 'stand recall'.
  7. FreeTheBeast

    FreeTheBeast BDR ambassador Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,576
    Location:
    +1.603
    Welcome! I hope you find much fun, excitement, and adventure on your new bike!

    There is a search box right at the top of this page. Several options open when you click your cursor in the box. It should help some, but you may find several rabbit holes that will take you away. :D

    Happy exploring!
  8. Gillard of Oz

    Gillard of Oz n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2021
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Hi everyone, this is a question regrading the brakes recall.
    I'm buying a 2018 bike with 430KM on the clock.
    BMW website stays the following regarding the recall:
    upload_2021-7-9_8-36-57.png
    Is it possible to visually see whether calipers were replaced?

    My concern is that, during the recall it won't have rust (bike has been garaged and idle) and therefore might not been worked on rather just 'inspected'.

    Thanks in advance.
  9. DMo

    DMo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2020
    Oddometer:
    22
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Wow. Really surprised by this. In the little that I’ve read about the new model updates, I don’t remember seeing press coverage about the loss of switchable ABS. This feature was a big factor for me in deciding to buy my ‘19, personally. It makes me wonder if BMW will lose some sales to the recently upgraded CRF Rally with its recent bump in displacement, loss of weight, and continued availability of switchable ABS.
  10. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,009
    Location:
    Ashland, OR, USA
    I wonder if the ABS switch removal has to do with the light weight of these bikes. I used to switch off the ABS on steep, downhill dirt stretches on my old R1100GS and F800GS to avoid a “runaway” situation. And if I ever neglected to switch it off, I learned quickly why I should have. :eekers But I can’t say that I’ve ever switched off the ABS on this bike in similar circumstances. There’s never been an instance where the rear wheel wouldn’t lock up in those situations on my G310GS.
    hiddenMeadow and FreeTheBeast like this.
  11. Liberty4Ever

    Liberty4Ever More Gelände... Less Straße

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Central Kentucky, USA
    That's good to know, but I still like being able to switch off the rear ABS on any bike that goes off road, even though I probably won't ride steep off road hills where that would be needed.

    I wonder if some regulatory agency mandated full time ABS, or multiple regulatory agencies had different rules that made it impossible to satisfy them all while providing a switchable ABS, so maybe BMW took the easy way out and gave in to regulators and removed the button that temporarily disables the ABS.

    Driving home tonight, it occurred to me that at least in theory, I might be able to upgrade my 2019 baby GS to the 2021 improvements while keeping the ABS switch, although the ABS switch may not be compatible with the new ride by wire stall resistant feature, for some reason?
  12. hasselman

    hasselman Motorcycle learner (since 1981)

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    178
    Location:
    Helsinki area, Finland
    Without checking the schematics, I think it would be possible to put a switch over/on the fuse for the ABS under the seat. With some wiring, the switch could be placed anywhere you like. It would of course void all warranty and make you liable to any damages caused to the nature and BMW reputation, if somebody found out about the switch.
  13. Gillard of Oz

    Gillard of Oz n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2021
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    There is a youtube video for this:
    2021 BMW G 310 GS how to turn off antilock brakes.
  14. FreeTheBeast

    FreeTheBeast BDR ambassador Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,576
    Location:
    +1.603
    I found when I removed that fuse, the speedometer and odometer also were deactivated. This will affect the fuel range calculation.

    It might be better to interrupt the wire going to the ABS unit after the fuse.
    Liberty4Ever likes this.
  15. Liberty4Ever

    Liberty4Ever More Gelände... Less Straße

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Central Kentucky, USA
    I watched the video.

    Bonus- The ABS setting stays where the rider selects rather than reverting to ABS enabled whenever the bike is started to satisfy some EU regulator who doesn't ride a motorcycle, much less ride off road.

    On the minus side, opening the ABS circuit at the fuse disables the speedometer and odometer, which is only acceptable if you don't care how fast you're riding, you don't mind running out of fuel because the range estimate is wrong, you don't want to perform maintenance at the proper service intervals, and you'd like to fraudulently sell your used baby GS with 30,000 miles to someone who believes it only has 3,000 miles.

    I need to test WoodWorks' observation that the G310GS doesn't need an ABS switch because the back wheel will skid on loose terrain even with the ABS enabled. If that's true, it could be the best of both worlds, with the ABS working the way it should, on road and off road, without needing to manually switch it on and off. Maybe BMW provided more aggressive rear ABS on the earlier bikes and made it less aggressive on the 2021 baby GS so there's no need to turn it off when riding off road.

    Otherwise, from my perspective, all of the improvements on the 2021 G310GS were offset by eliminating the ABS button. Detracting from the off road capabilities would seem to demonstrate that BMW isn't serious about the baby GS as a true GS for off road riding. They're apparently marketing it more as an upright beginner bike in the west, and as a bike for poorly maintained roads in Asia.
    glitch_oz, WoodWorks and FreeTheBeast like this.
  16. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,009
    Location:
    Ashland, OR, USA
    From what I can tell, that's pretty much what BMW's marketing approach for this bike has been from the beginning. They were trying the break in to markets in the "developing world." And those of us who were looking for a lightweight, reliable, adventure tourer weren't really on their radar.

    If you go back far enough in this thread, you'll see some posts about the absolute certainty that BMW was going to come out with an "Adventure" version of the 310. With spoked wheels, a bigger tank...

    Still waiting on that.

    As for the ABS switch, I seem to recall reading something about the G310GS's ABS system being smart enough to allow for independent sensitivity on the front and rear wheels, so you can lock up the rear while maintaining anti-lock capability on the front. But don't quote me on that.
    glitch_oz and Liberty4Ever like this.
  17. hasselman

    hasselman Motorcycle learner (since 1981)

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    178
    Location:
    Helsinki area, Finland
    I'm sorry WoodWorks, but I have to quote you on "that". The lack of a switch for the ABS is most certainly not a choice by BMW. They only adapt to regulations. One has to keep in mind the Baby-GS is not an enduro bike, not even a "real" GS, it's a small size look-a-like-GS. When it comes from the factory it's a cheap street bike (with limited off-road capability) for the huge developing markets of Asia. As some people discovered, the G310GS has potential to become a good light weight adventure bike. It only takes a few modifications, like changing the suspension.
    When it comes to the lack of possibility to turn off the ABS, there is an easy cure. When driving down slippery hills, you can easily turn off the engine and regulate rear wheel speed with the clutch. I know it isn't possible to use for turning-sliding, but as I said before the G310GS isn't and never was intended to be an enduro bike. But then again, an enduro bike can't be taken to a round-the-world trip without modifying it completely.
  18. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,009
    Location:
    Ashland, OR, USA
    Well, that's an interesting theory, Hasselman. But if you're "most certain" about it, can you tell us which country's regulations caused this design change? And while you're at it, could you let us know how outlawing an ABS switch in one country would affect the inclusion of it in all of the others?
  19. hasselman

    hasselman Motorcycle learner (since 1981)

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    178
    Location:
    Helsinki area, Finland
    I never claimed to be an expert on regulations for motorcycles. I have however read in motorcycle related media a couple of years ago about coming EU regulations requiring ABS on all motorcycles intended for road use as of 1 January 2016. These are the regulations BMW as a manufacturer has to follow.
    As not being a native speaker (or writer) of the English language, it's easy to use some expressions that can be misinterpreted, as you obviously have chosen to do. I'd like to point out that I did not write that I am sure about whether BMW choose or didn't choose to omit the switch.
    As for the legal situation in the USA, concerning constantly active ABS or the possibility having it switchable by the vehicles operator, you'll have to seek legal advice from somebody who is an expert on the legislation covering road traffic in USA.
    hiddenMeadow and willfreely like this.
  20. Liberty4Ever

    Liberty4Ever More Gelände... Less Straße

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Central Kentucky, USA
    That's one of the pernicious aspects of regulations. Manufacturers are forced to comply with all of them. It's very expensive to maintain a different version of a complicated product such as a motorcycle for each country. To maintain a low cost for everyone, a manufacturer will usually be forced to comply with all of the regulations of each country, for every country. That's how I'm forced to purchase motorcycles that comply with strict (and often stupid) European regulations even though I don't live in Europe and didn't have the opportunity to vote against any of the politicians who are ultimately responsible for the regulations. This is regulation without representation.

    If one regulatory agency requires some feature or specification that has negative market appeal and the manufacturer decides to comply with the regulation for only the countries where it is legally required, there's a very good chance that other regulatory agencies will not want to be seen as less safety minded, and they'll adopt the same regulation next year, so that's another reason why manufacturers tend to go straight to surrender when confronted by a new regulation. Regulations multiply like cockroaches.

    I'd prefer to see these issues resolved in the voluntary free market rather than compelled by regulations. I want ABS on a bike and voluntarily pay more for that safety feature, but I want to be able to turn it off when riding off road. The highway safety regulations that seek to make motorcycles safer on the road are making motorcycles more dangerous off road, but the regulators don't care. They measure success based on highway safety statistics. Emissions standards often prevent reductions in pollution by requiring a high emissions standard for all new models, so manufacturers have an economic incentive to continue producing outdated models with carburetors rather than gradually improving each model year with the features that customers want such as electronic fuel injection (looking at you, Suzuki DR) and incurring the cost of certifying each change with all of the regulatory agencies.
    hasselman likes this.