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BMW G650X Challenge Thread Index

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by GB, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. LangKat

    LangKat Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    68
    Location:
    Johannesburg
    Also have the unifilter, works great!
  2. Niedz

    Niedz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    648
    Location:
    Bucks County, PA
    thanks a lot jerks, now i am worried about premature engine wear due to my K&N filter.
  3. bigdon

    bigdon Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,747
    you should be:rofl
  4. DiscoDino

    DiscoDino Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,825
    Location:
    Lebanon/NYC
    I have BOTH the Unifilter AND their prefilter...having come from trucks...I hate the K&N type of filter and it always made my engines run rough...
  5. Rev Kiecker

    Rev Kiecker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2002
    Oddometer:
    729
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    I run both as well. The only issue I see with this is it does not provide as much protection from water entering the airbox should you go through deep crossings.

    Here's what I wrote from last weekend's ride:
    Full weekend report here: http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16589457&postcount=422
  6. Muddler

    Muddler Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,128
    Location:
    Dardanup, Western Australia
    Yes, the air entry is a problem, though its nothing to do with what type of filter we use. I think the only solution is to completely block off the entry and install a conventional snorkel, rear facing, into the air box lid
  7. Sltx1050

    Sltx1050 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    95
    Location:
    St louis, MO
    After taking on some water this spring i ride with my airbox drain open at all times now
  8. Rev Kiecker

    Rev Kiecker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2002
    Oddometer:
    729
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Something to consider. :jjen Perhaps add something small inside to act as a filter on the open end.
  9. Pcfly

    Pcfly Dude?! Seriously?? Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,947
    Location:
    North of the Columbia River
    I’m on an information gathering mission to eventually buy a G650X later this year. Wondering if you guys could bullet point a few things to look out for when buying an Xchallenge. Prices seem to be about $5,000 depending on mods and condition. What would be considered too many miles?? What are some things to have checked when buying one?? <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Thanks for any help in advance. :clap
  10. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand
    Made in Australia, the Nomad tanks are very robust and easy to install with either hard or soft mounting option.
    I often find myself stretching the mileage capabilities of my bikes while off-road and on the odd occasion stretched those capabilities a bit too far. The last time this happened it was a quick decision made to find an aux tank.

    I didn't much like the idea of carrying a container I had to remove from the bike to refuel the main tank. So I started the search and just by chance found another Xchallenge owner had already solved this problem.

    Introducing the Nomad Tank...

    http://nomadtanks.com.au/

    Attached Files:

  11. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand
    Since I already had previously mounted a TT rack it made the installation of the tank quite easy. However, The tank has a very convenient cut-out contour to fit across the back end of narrow motor-cross and dual-sport style saddles. The tank also comes with pre-mounted brass inserts and the basic mounting bolts and screws for hard mounting the tank to a sturdy hard surface. Also in the kit comes a couple of very strong and durable rubber mounting strops and a soft foam pad to increase mounting options. As you can see here, I have mounted the Nomad tank on the TT rack and still have plenty of room for the TT tool bag to fit on the back of the saddle. The idea of the Nomad tank is to feel fuel into either the same fuel line as the main tank or in the case of how I installed my tank, to tap the fuel line into the main tank. It was actually much easier than install than I thought. I simply pulled the breather tube of the top of the main tank and pushed the fuel line from the aux Nomad tank onto this breather tube mounting and added a hose clamp. The new breather hose for the entire fuel system comes off the cap of the Nomad tank. A few zip-ties later and job done.:clap:clap

    Attached Files:

  12. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand
    The Nomad tank is quite light weight so once it's empty it adds very little excess weight to the back of the bike. The option by which I mounted it also allows me to easily remove the tank if if I so wish. I thought I might take advantage of this on shorter ride days but since it's so light I have yet to ever remove it even when not used for carrying extra fuel.
    It's a 7.5 liter tank, (approx. 2 US Gallon) and when added to the 9 liters I carry in the main tank, well you do the math. Lets just say I have yet to find the run dry mileage while using the Nomad tank. Reason why, obvious!!:clap:clap

    Nomad make several different sizes and shapes of tanks for all sorts of bikes and the materials used to produce them is top quality.

    Now I never meant for this to be a Nomad Tanks advertisement, however when one finds a product that truly works, well I for one will gladly endorse that product.:D:D

    Dave
    Somewhere in the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Attached Files:

  13. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand

    Never used K&N filters. However...

    I personally use the Uni Filter on both my F800 GS and the G650 XChallenge. A foam filter that can easily be cleaned, re-oiled and re-used numerous times before needing replacing. As for the filter in the 800 it has been cleaned and reused eight times. I clean the filter an average of every 5,000 k or after a very dusty dirty adventure weekend. It's not even close to showing signs of deterioration. Same goes for the filter in the 650, however it's only been cleaned a few times as I only bought it a year ago.

    Having said this, the Uni Filter for the 800 came with "pre-filter" socks to go over the snorkel like intakes. I found these restricted the air too much and removed them completely within a few days of use.

    I hope this helps,
    Dave
  14. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand
    I won't write heaps on this as it's very cut and dry.
    The Leo Vince is much lighter, smaller, and adds noticeable torque to the power band of the XChallenge.
    I use my X as a "hard-enduro" for which it's meant to be used and thus these advantages have real value for me.

    Before and after.

    Attached Files:

  15. Kiwi Dave

    Kiwi Dave Beemer Boy

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Arrowtown, South Island, New Zealand

    And the after..

    Attached Files:

  16. LangKat

    LangKat Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    68
    Location:
    Johannesburg
    I would start by reading some of the links in the first post of this thread if you haven't done so already. Especially the must do mods. That should get you started on what to look for.

    Some of the things I looked for were cracks in the subframe, wear on the air shock (G-spot issue) and wear on the stock aluminium wheel spacers. Also, if the owner is still using the stock airfilter check for dust in the airbox; the stock airfilter doesn't cut it offroad and lets a lot of dirt in.

    Hope that helps.
  17. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,229
    Location:
    Schmocation
    You can check this by seeing how much side to side flex there is in the subframe. It is possible to weld up cracks and weld in re-inforcement to cut the chances of it happening again. Also check how centred the taillight is over the rear wheel. Because the subframe is lopsided in two different planes, any movement in it will result in the rear of the bike moving sideways.

    excellent point, I have just seen an engine having to be rebuilt in Holland due to using stock airfilter on dusty rides. The stock airfilter seems to work like a sieve ... filling up with dust first and then the bikes vibrations sieve the finer particles through. The engine had to be rebuilt after just 18000 km (11,000 miles) because the rings were completely worn ... due to dust and fine sand getting thru the filter
  18. foxqc

    foxqc Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21
    Dear fellow G650X challenge riders...

    I use my bike essentially for rally-type rides, fast and not too much technical.

    Yesterday, after about 4 hours of riding, there was a sudden drop in power. The sound did change instantly and the moto didn't want to rev very high. I was ok to get back home, but the bike would not go above, say 100km/h. I'd say it lost 30% of it's power, maybe more. The throttle response is not too bad at low revs, but the motor make a barking sound when I attempt to rev higher, with no power available....

    Bizzare..

    The air filter is clean. Stock exhaust.. My guess would be that something fried in the injection, or a sensor of some kind....

    Any of you hav experienced this?

    Regards,

    JF
  19. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,260
    Location:
    Tacoma - ish, WA
    My first suspect would be the catalytic converter in the OEM muffler. Take it off and give it a shake. If anything is loose or rattling, you have a blockage. The only fix is a new muffler.
  20. plumber mike

    plumber mike Highdive Deepened

    Joined:
    May 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    11,824
    Location:
    Paha Sapa
    Clogged stock exhaust. Look for excessive heat and discoloration of the head pipe. If you pull the pipe off the bike, you can shake it and hear the "lead shot" stuff rolling around in there. With the pipe pulled off the bike, the power should be restored. Run it to confirm.
    Replace with aftermarket pipe.....soon, so as to not damage the valve guides from excessive heat.