BMW G650X Challenge Thread Index

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by GB, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. jdwhite

    jdwhite Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2014
    Oddometer:
    141
    Location:
    Lusitanistan
    Exide used to be stock on the X bikes, but there were some bad ones that caused a recall. Since then they use Yuasa.
    That was years ago, so I hope it´s not a problem anymore because the bike really gets "crazy" with little less than optimal power...
  2. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    4,588
    Location:
    NYC
    Further adventures in motorcycle maintenance.

    You can tell it was time to work on the bike because it was raining. Here's the engine taken out and a nice look at my very professional motorcycle jack/stand/maintenance stool - you don't have to take anything off the front to take the engine out and I'm using that to keep the loom generally in line. Once I get everything back in and running I'm going to replace the steering head bearings, but that's a (much easier) project for next month.
    [​IMG]

    I don't know why, but this reminds me of this picture. Don't click if you don't want to see a dying hyena.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the engine in my very professional work space. Dutchgit, it's heated and has carpet, TV and a fridge with snacks and beer. :gdog
    [​IMG]

    I used the old "don't touch the damned head gasket if there's an easier way" trick, popped out the retaining clip on each side and pushed the sleeve out. Make sure your spark plugs are out or you'll create a vacuum and this won't work.
    [​IMG]

    If you open up the clutch side of the bottom you can unscrew the bolt that holds the black plastic cam chain guide. It makes this step a lot easier.
    [​IMG]

    Once that sleeve is out it just pops right off. Disconnecting my bottom end and hooking up tbarstow's is really what this is all about so I was pretty happy to get to this point.
    [​IMG]

    I thought it was interesting that there was some rust on the compensating shaft. How would that even get there? Prior owner? Even if you got some water in there I would think that the coating of oil would stop it from rusting. I didn't notice any rust anywhere else so this just seems odd to me. Anyone have any ideas on what could have happened? It doesn't really matter as tbarstow's was shiny and new, but still makes me wonder.
    [​IMG]

    Then just button it back up. After you unbutton it again because you drop a washer from the cam shaft support bracket all the way down into the bowels of the engine. :baldy It was such a tiny washer but leaving it to sit on the bottom of the crank case just didn't seem right. Still... :becca
    [​IMG]

    You can see I brought the throttle body in for cleaning (and so I could explain how the engine worked to my son) and those are the old water pump seals next to the engine as well. I also replaced the neutral sensor and shift lever seal and will replace all the hoses as I put them back on.

    The one thing that I really got hung up on was trying to get the head bolts out of the old engine. I knew tbarstow had (very kindly) included his and you can see the envelope they were in on the floor next to the throttle body but I couldn't find them so I figured I'd just take out the old ones. Even using a couple of nuts together and all my strength would result in the two nuts twisting together which is something I actually hadn't seen before - that trick had always worked for me. Anyone know if there's some other trick or if they're loctited to within an inch of their life? I couldn't figure out what I was doing wrong - there was certainly enough mechanical force being applied to move them.

    As always, happy to answer any questions anyone may have.
    Bli55, Zeus99 and Dutchgit like this.
  3. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,681
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    I had to use heat to soften the thread locker on the studs to remove them. The little butane torch works well for that.
  4. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    4,588
    Location:
    NYC
    Good to know, thanks. I actually had mine (and the fire extinguisher just in case) set up and ready to go but decided to give it one last look and I found them. I assume the threat of burning down the apt caused it to yield up its treasure.
  5. chassr

    chassr Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2014
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    San Pedro, CA
    Another possibility is that your #2 exhaust valve is out of spec. I had the same issue on my '07 Xcountry. A new battery can correct the problem for a while, but if it resurfaces the valve lash is the likely culprit. You are right about the decomp lever only being an issue on the '09 bikes.
    keepshoveling likes this.
  6. MJS

    MJS Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,741
    Location:
    Off the grid in San Felipe, Baja
    It is a simple matter of replacing the flywheel and stator. You will need a flywheel puller for the switch. I think I paid about $30 for one. I converted our bikes to a MOSFET VR at the same time but the stock VR will plug right in to the 400 watt stator.
    keepshoveling and Dutchgit like this.
  7. Len

    Len Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2015
    Oddometer:
    5,896
    Location:
    North Alabama
    If you want to use LiPO4 battery you will need to convert to the MOSFET VR since a higher voltage and tighter band charge is needed.
  8. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    4,588
    Location:
    NYC
    I have a shorai and stock VR and no problems. :dunno It's only been a year though.
  9. Len

    Len Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2015
    Oddometer:
    5,896
    Location:
    North Alabama
    I put the Shorai in the Dakar and updated to MOSFET mounted high, the older Dakar's VR mounted low had a failure mode of high voltage when overheated. Bad Karma for Lithium. I think the VR's for the F650GS and X are the same but the X is mounted up in the wind so less chance for overheating. Since I live down south, I didn't want to take a chance. There is another type of VR that sounded interesting, Roadstercycle, it is load shedding once the battery is topped up instead of shunt so it is a free performance boost, albeit small.

    Wayne's site with the details. http://www.f650gs.crossroadz.com.au/VRegulator.html
    keepshoveling likes this.
  10. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    4,588
    Location:
    NYC
    Interesting, thanks!
  11. beemer67

    beemer67 Really Old airhead

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    282
    Location:
    Fish Limb, B.C. Canada
    Expert consensus..
    Just cleaned and regreased swingarm, all looks good.

    Left side swingarm pivot - 80NM torque - do you put in dry, anti-sieze or oiled - do you downsize torque setting to compensate?

    Plastic thrust washers on left swingarm pivot - greased or left dry or doesn't matter?

    Same with bottom shock bolt (and top for that matter) - 85NM - dry, oiled, lesser torgue amount?

    Guess that might cancel out the benefit of the Nylock?
  12. advFord

    advFord Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    688
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Finally wrote up a list showing how my Xchallenge handled on my 8 month and 20,000 mile journey from CA to Argentina.

    Regular Maintenance on the Road
    • 3 Rear Tires (Heidenau K60, TKC-80, Conti-Escape)
    • 1 Front Tire (Heidenau K60 - entire trip)
    • Rear Brake Pads: 1 set
    • Chains: 1
    • Front and Rear Sprockets: 1 set
    • Rear Wheel Bearings: 1 set
    • Oil Changes: 5
    Breakdowns/Replacements
    • Flat Tires: 4 (rear)
    • Mirror mounts: 3
    • Rear Rack bolts broken : 2 at 6mm (tapped new 8mm afterward - just do it before :-)
    • Ignition wire solder (this was after I had re-soldered before the trip began)
    • Heated handgrip wire solder
    • Exhaust to muffler gasket: 1
    • Front Wheel Bearings: 2 sets
    • Rear Sprocket Carrier Bearings: 1 set
    • Headlight Fuse: 1
    • Tool Tube brackets broke
    • Steering Stabilizer rod
    • Giant Loop pannier strap
    • Chain guard bolt: x3
    • Windscreen bolt: x1
  13. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,764
    Location:
    Герма́ния
    I do all that stuff up real tight and put some grease on the threads and a lot of grease on the swing arm bolt so it comes out every where doing it up.
    I put grease on all threads that go into aluminium. (apart from braking components, then I use a drop of Loctite)
    keepshoveling likes this.
  14. gqelements

    gqelements Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    T-Dot, Canada
    hey guys does anyone know an alternate source or substitute for exhaust gasket (#10 below)?
    I ran last year without one (sold off an upgraded exhaust to return to quieter stock unit and must have not paid attention to that part missing) and now hoping to put a proper part )or equivalent) in, but don't want to wait 3 weeks for the BMW option (or pay 18USD which is over 25 CAD!!!)...
    an ideas?

    upload_2016-2-28_14-56-45.png
  15. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,764
    Location:
    Герма́ния
    I've had that on my old F650. I used a piece of aluminium pipe that had the right size.
  16. trailrider71us

    trailrider71us I can't b fired,only sold

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    If you want to make your stock exhaust really nice, remove the cat from it. It is incredible how much heat you lose and it is still quiet.
    You also eliminate the potential problem of a plugged cat.
  17. blaster11

    blaster11 Still having fun!

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,547
    Location:
    Southern Maryland and West Virginia
    Does anybody have pictures of the cutting the muffler open to remove the cat?
  18. trailrider71us

    trailrider71us I can't b fired,only sold

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    There was a few pics somewhere on the internet, but I can't find them. You basically use a whizzer wheel and cut the muffler open at the front seam.
    Then it will be in 2 peices. Now you will see the cat. Take a sawzall with a long blade and cut at the back part of the cat. you need the long blade because
    you will be cutting right next to the outer stainless shell of the muffler next to the seam that you just cut with the whizzer wheel. The cut to remove the cat
    is to close to the shell of the muffler to use the whizzer,that is why you are using the sawzall for the 2nd cut.
    Once you have the cat out, you can weld in a piece of pipe if you want to get the exhaust into the baffle area where the cat got it to. Tack weld the pipe in first
    and try assembling it to make sure it lines up. Once that is fit, TIG weld the seam back together and you have a really nice exhaust that is nicer than most
    aftermarket ones. You can have the cat cut out in about a 1/2 hour w/o too much trouble. Rudimentary mechanics.
    Kiharaikido and blaster11 like this.
  19. seasider

    seasider Just a rider

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,047
    Location:
    Virginia
    Anybody have an oem can they want to sell?
  20. trailrider71us

    trailrider71us I can't b fired,only sold

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    blaster11 likes this.