Brian's First Ride Report: Mexico 2019

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by LogHouseBikers, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Tuesday was a bit more exciting. The road was a mix of city and rural, hugging the coast at times, until the area around Acapulco. My google maps took me part way around, then dumped me back into the city. It is a huge, busy place.
    I continued south trying to distance myself from the loud busy city. Staying on Mx200, following the coastline as much as possible, took me to the city of Marquelia. Where the road crosses a river just north of the city, I encountered a major traffic jam and the road was blocked. The traffic was backed up maybe 2 miles(?), so I utilized the novelty of being on a motorcycle in Mexico, and rode the left lane around the stopped vehicles. Well what do you know? The traffic jam was due to a big demonstration, where they purposely blocked the road into town. Impassably blocked. Using banners, wagons, people, whatever they had... no traffic was going to get through. So I turned around and went back to a road I saw heading toward the beach, "Playa Ventura." A quiet little beach area with a small town, Colonia Juan N. Alvarez, and a batch of little hotels. Definitely a must return to place. Again, falling asleep to the sounds of surf on the shore, and the fresh aroma of the sea. I could stay here a llloooooonnnnggg time!
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    The beach goes on forever....
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  2. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Wednesday was another early start. I was hoping the demonstration was over, or at least shut down for the night. Aarrggh! Road still blocked at 8 am. Traffic still backed up for miles.

    I had passed a couple of other motorcyclists, who were stopped on the side of the road in one of the little towns to fix a flat tire. So I turned around and went back to say hello? They told me the demonstration was going to last all day, but would clear the road in the evening. Hmmmm... Now what?
    The guys couldn't really give a better alternative other than "back to Acapulco and go inland around." Well... I asked my good friend Google for an alternative.

    The result was a 3 hour detour that would get me around and put me just the other side of the demonstration. So off I went.
    I followed the google route up into the hills through a few small towns. A twisty mountain road, much like back home. Sort of. In Oregon we don't usually encounter donkeys on the road way. Or goat herds for that matter. But I got around them without troubles. The trouble was when I passed through a little town I could not find the name of. It's just west of San Luis Acatlan. The road ducked down to a river crossing, with a cable suspension wooden bridge. Probably 20-30 feet above the river. The problem was the steel cables with locks strung across to prevent anything but foot traffic. There were a couple of men carrying heavy bags across the bridge to place in a truck waiting for them. The fellow driving the truck told me no crossing the bridge. He suggested I could try crossing the river like a couple of guys with donkeys and horses were doing. Noting that the horse was belly deep, and the donkey was mid body, almost swimming, I decided against that route. Did I remember to mention that by now I could see a man standing on the other side of the bridge holding what looked like an M-16 or an AK or AR? That was when I started thinking... "Brian old boy,... You should probably just turn around and get the #$*@ out of here while no one is telling you to do something else." And that's what I did. I really wanted to try that bridge... or at least get a picture... but I didn't for one second believe that guy on the other side would be cool with that. I would not have believed it if I hadn't been there.

    So again I back-tracked. i got back to hwy 200, stopped at a gas station, and broke out the computer to search for another way. It was after 2:00, so I figured I could think better if my stomach would stop growling at me. I think it was asking if my throat had been cut.

    I went to a roadside taco restaurant, thinking I would eat and then go back to the roadblock and wait it out with the other folks. While I was enjoying my meal I noticed that suddenly there were A LOT of vehicles passing by heading north. It was quickly obvious the road blockade had desisted. I finished quickly and headed south again with a happy heart, and stomach.

    I wanted to make up for the time spent running back and forth, so I rode until just dark. I found myself a little hotel in Santa Rosa de Lima. No hot water, but I'm not complaining tonight. I am happy to be continuing my adventure. Tomorrow will be a short day, planning to take a few days to look around Puerto Escondido. Maybe even get in another SCUBA dive if I can.
  3. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Have a couple of questions Brian. What's the average price you are paying for these small hotels along the beach? And why do they all seem deserted? Are there any guests but you at these places?
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  4. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    The hotlels are 150-300 pesos/night. Most at the upper end of that. Once it was 400. As for the lack of other folks your guess is as good as mine. Kids are in school? Busy work time of year? Usually seeing a couple of other guests, but that's it.
    Sometimes it's like Motel 6 back in the states. Travelers stopping in late and leaving early. Still, out in the little beach towns it's pretty scarce to see many guests.
  5. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    C7E9FDB6-654B-4DEC-A06D-DD71B9F1BE7A.jpeg 277D6B09-F0B4-4F16-B5B2-1FB46212D84C.jpeg 0C1E70EC-4770-481B-A960-02EE56BED232.jpeg B715CFA8-0AF1-4CED-A128-A66A9EB67253.jpeg The hotel last night, in the morning.
  6. joenuclear

    joenuclear Long timer

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    Like your pace. Keep it coming!
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  7. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    Brian
    At the next road block ride up to the front and stop. Look for the likely person in charge and ask what they are protesting about and tell them you are just a tourist and need to get south for an appointment.
    Smile a lot. This has worked numerous times for me. Dont be afraid to try even if you can not speak Spanish, try to communicate, you may be surprised and they let you through.
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  8. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for the tip. I will try that if it happens again. I rode up to the blockade, but the people there wouldn't let me pass. All in all it worked out ok. I found a great beach area to return to next trip, and had a great adventure trying to find a way around. One of the young mexican guys I talked with, that had the flat tire, commented "It's all good when you are on your motorcycle" or something to that effect. Google translate is a handy thing! And he is absolutely right, too.
    Cameleer, Burro driver and Davidprej like this.
  9. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Up late last night trying to get caught up on posts, so slept until 8:30 this morning. Had breakfast at a little restaurant. Traditional wood cooking stove, and cooks.
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    A short 1 1/2 hour ride to (almost) Puerto Escondido after breakfast. Staying at another up-scale resort for a few nights. Vivo Resort, Puerto Escindido. Nice place. Right on the beach.
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  10. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    A mountain side room, with this view...
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    This is the beach though...
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  11. Cameleer

    Cameleer Europe, three days at a time.

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    Fantastic trip and report Brian, you did not miss much in Acapulco. I lived there many years ago when it was a beautiful place, now unfortunately it has degenerated into a messy and unkept big city.

    You will enjoy Puerto Escondido, the state and city of Oaxaca is a magical place.

    Contrary to previous advise, I would recommend to stay clear of crowds on roads and political demonstrations as tempers against the new government are running red hot these days. These are often filled with drunks and handled by professional shit stirrers from the organized crime. Not worth the risk IMHO.

    Keep the report flowing and stay safe mate!
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  12. GU221

    GU221 vogon

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    Enjoying this... I did Mexico in '88. The hotel in Playa Azul looks suspiciously similar to where we stayed, but maybe its too modern. The road to Oaxaca from the coast was one of my favourite rides ever. Did it on a Guzzi Le Mans 1000.
  13. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    This question for anybody out there. How do people handle finances when traveling by bike in Mexico, does one carry lots of pesos with you :confused Stop at ATMS along the way? What is the safe way to handle that issue? Loving the RR, my brother has lived in Colima for years and I have thought about riding my bike down there one day. He has a couple of condo's in Manzanillo also.
  14. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    IMHO... ATM's are the way to go. Not that I have ever experienced any troubles, but I am wary of carrying lots of cash. I try to start with 2500 peso's (or so) for daily expenses and nightly lodging. I spread that about my luggage so it is not all in one place. I keep @ 500 pesos in my jacket pocket so I am not flashing a bundle when making a purchase (like fuel or food.) When I get down to 500 pesos cash I look for a bank with an ATM (early in the day... so I will be some distance away by the time I stop for the night.) Usually the larger cities have the big banks like BanaMex/Santander/Aztec, where I feel safer/more comfortable making a withdrawal. Most of the major gas stations accept credit cards, so that is an option for fuel purchasing, as well. This is all my opinion, of course, and it applies to traveling in any foreign country, not just Mexico. Common sense?
    eakins, mrfishingrod, silsen and 7 others like this.
  15. silsen

    silsen Long timer

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    I was in Oaxaca last year,a wonderful experience with many interesting places to visit,each a short bus ride away.
  16. RW66

    RW66 Been here awhile

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    I always use the ATM machines. I try to use the ones at the major banks but I have also used them at the local Oxxo without any problems. I have had problems with getting my credit card cloned when using it. If you use your credit card don’t let it get out of your site.
    Just my experience.
  17. silsen

    silsen Long timer

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    I spend two to three months each year in Mexico with my Latina wife,who was born in Colombia. We always use pesos and always get them at an ATM machine in a bank. It’s safer that way,we’ve known quite a few people who have been defrauded by card readers often attached to independently owned and operated ATM’s located in the street and in OXXOs.
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  18. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    Not to hijack this thread but I am in the process of protesting 2 ATM withdrawals at Bancomer for a total of $700.00 cdn. My bank shows the money coming out of my account but I received no money at the machine, the machine just said can not communicate with your bank. This happened in Chihuahua and Durango. at Bancomer.
    Davidprej likes this.
  19. vicmitch

    vicmitch Been here awhile

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    Happened to me at Santander In Zumpango.
  20. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Good ride today. Started by meeting up with Edstoll for breakfast in Puerto Escondido. He too is traveling here in Mexico, and making a ride report on this forum. It was nice to visit with a fellow MC traveler, and ADV inmate. (I caught him not looking...:lol3)
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    After breakfast I set out for Huatulco and Salina Cruz. Along the way I took a detour on the 2nd Hwy 175 intersection. Took me to Puerto Angel and Mazunte (and a few beach towns in between.)
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