Brutus: The CB550F Cafe/Gravel Runner Build

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by JB2, Nov 11, 2015.

  1. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    radianrider - Well the '55's were born without seatbelts. My guess is they installed them after the law came into affect which probably means they only had belts in the outboard positions, probably not in the center. However, I have heard the story you mentioned more than a few times. Cars from that era were famous for being the breeding ground for a couple's first child. Reminds me of something I heard as a kid that has stuck with me ever since, "Life is sexually transmitted." :nod
  2. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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  3. ed mocz

    ed mocz Las Vegas Supporter

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    For the Harley orange I used to use chevy engine block orange. Did a few for Keith Ulicki back in the day.
  4. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    It has been a long summer so to speak. All of a sudden it is fall and everything I had planned on doing did not get done while everything that I never dreamed of doing did get done.

    No progress on Brutus but that's not for the lack of wanting to. :fpalm

    On my last trip to the Moto-Armory I returned with body parts for three different bikes. Here's a pictorial update on the completion of those parts. I took a few photos in the beginning but not much on the in between during the painting process since most everyone hanging out here is familiar with the process. :0-0

    As they arrived:

    [​IMG]

    Since the Jay Springsteen tribute bike isn't very well documented and not confirmed to have ever been owned or ridden by the man they decided to repaint it in a more traditional HD Racing scheme. The first thing I did was to photo-document the way I received it just in case they ever wanted back to this paint scheme. CYA! It will wear an XR750-esque paint scheme.

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    Lay on some paper to make a transfer of the lettering was the last detail before stripping it down to the gel-coat.

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    Rub with a soft graphite pencil and viola!

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    Once stripped those parts were prepped for priming...

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    ... and then primed.

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    Next the Triumph flat-tracker gets some attention. The tail section was a swap meet piece but it was also a lifted copy. Someone had taken a pretty decent mold from the original but failed miserably when it cam to actually making a new part. As you can see they pulled a mold with the seat bracket bolted on and got this impression of a panhead bolt in the new part complete with...

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    ... the pinstripes that were also on the donor part. I traced the shadow stripes that transferred to the new part. Interesting. Note also the hairline cracks that are lurking both photos. Therein lies the next problem.

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    The gel-coat was put in the mold just as it was ready to "kick" or "set-up". Worse yet it was applied with a brush and left a nasty brushstroke profile that was enhanced by being applied just as it kicked which meant is was FULL of pinholes and pinhole clusters like this.

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    As I worked my way through the failed gel-coat I discovered lines of air pockets in the fiberglass caused by the heavy brushstrokes.

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    Furthermore the edge of the seat was barely a 1/16" thick after removing the bad material.

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    ... so the edges got several reinforcing strips added to the bottom edge. Since this bike will see competition again it has to survive some rigorous stress. All in all I had more work in this one piece than I did the other 4 pieces combined... and it was the new piece. :scratch

    [​IMG]

    The only other surprise was the $178.00 price tag for one pint of Harley Racing Orange!

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    In October we host our good friends Lou and Carol Usher from South Carolina. We met and have become family through motorcycles and music. Saturday night we gather with friends for music and camaraderie. This year we were blessed with several friends who showed up with their instruments to play along with Lou. :kumbaya

    This is Larry Thompson who lives near us in Matthews, Indiana. I have painted a few bikes for him personally and have painted bikes that he was restoring for other folks. I've known him for over 25 years but only recently learned that he is fairly infected with a love for traditional blues and plays guitar. I would kick myself in the arse for not knowing this but the line is too long. :augie

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    This is Banjo Randy. He started playing banjo at age 5 and was considered a child prodigy. At age 17 he was in a bad car crash and was in a coma for 6 months. When he awoke from his near death experience he was still in traction. His pelvis was crushed in numerous places. Every bone in both legs was broken at least once and some in two or three places. That he can walk is a miracle. He lost everything related to the banjo so he had to start learning the instrument all over again. They say great things come from tragedy. Randy has had a hard life with his mobility being very limited at an early age along with other facets of his life that are too deep to share but, he has his banjo and a talent that does not waiver. People like him inspire me. Despite what life has handed him he still shines. Play on Banjo! :strum

    [​IMG]
    Three good friends of ours, but new to each other, finding a grove and entertaining a ragtag group of riders. Does it get any better? :beer

    [​IMG]

    I had three weekends occupied with trips to Milwaukee to get our son's Jetta back up and running. We just had a long weekend with the Ushers but that was after spending the last weekend in August with Meg and Mark at the very RUST-ic and haunted Story Inn in southern Indiana.

    [​IMG]

    The left over weekends were all filled with the three bikes for the Moto-Armory. Add in the longs hours at my day job, yard work, house maintenance, all of my wife's concerts, not to mention 4 trips to the museum this summer, it was all over in a blink. Thank God winter is coming and the demands on our lives lessen which will allow more time to work on Brutus.... NOT!

    Okay back to the museum bikes... I delivered these pieces back to the Moto-Armory last weekend. Ray Sterns was very happy with the work. The table in the conference room is now full of pieces I have restored. All the bikes that belong to these parts are being detailed at one of their other locations. The body parts will be re-installed when they come back to this facility. I didn't take any other photos of the finished parts so you get to see them all here together. The black/orange set belongs to a Harley-Davidson MX250 flat-tracker. The silver/black/white set belong to a late 60's Triumph flat-tracker. The tiny peanut tank belongs to an early 50's Triumph hill-climb bike. Hopefully the next time I visit here the bikes will be back together so I can photograph them completed.

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    As I neared the museum I called Ray to let him know I was close. Ray says "Great!" because he needed a hand taking apart another bike that was coming back home with me. At the museum we disassembled this very rare 1941 WR flat-tracker. It is one of 36 built in 1941 and one of only 12 known left in existence. The museum bought the bike at Mecum in 2015. It has a decent restoration on it and is numbers-matching... but purple? I am going to change it out to a more period correct style paint scheme. Without much provenance it's hard to say what the original scheme was but we're going to nix the purple for sure. :nod

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    From there we went over to the warehouse where they are prepping 150 bikes for the Mecum auction in Las Vegas that will take place in January of 2018. They had some piece work on a couple of vintage Pentons they wanted redone. While I was there I met Dave DeBaene who recently acquired a 1948 Triumph Speed Twin with an amateur restoration. Dave is a first class machinist who is working with Ray to prep the Mecum bikes. I spent an hour with him going over the nuances of the Triumph and the things that had been improperly restored. In the end I walked away with the job to restore it. It will be a lot deeper and more in depth than the work I have done thus far for the museum.

    The last thing on the list today was to load and deliver a very rare(1 of 2 ever built) Sachs Rotary ISDT bike to Kip Kern on my way home. Late in the day with over 300 miles to travel I said my goodbyes to Ray and Dave and pointed the F150 towards home fully loaded. Ray says he'll call next week to let me know what other bikes I will very soon be involved with for both the museum and the Mecum auction.

    On the way home I began to digest the opportunities that lay before me. This thing has snowballed but I ain't complaining. At age almost 60 it has never been in my DNA to retire. I want to be productive and have value in the world of motorcycling until the day I pass. With over 500K life miles on motorcycles I have been to almost everywhere I want to go at least 3 or 4 times. I can take a few summers of traveling off to pursue my next career. I have longed to walk away from collision repair for over a decade now and the chance to do that may be staring me in the face.

    Lots to think about. :hmmmmm

    And Brutus? I have a small financial stake and a sentimental stake in the project. This was going to be the first bike I built for myself. However it is quickly becoming an equity stake in this new endeavor. The money from it would pay for a new cabinet sand-blaster and let me refurbish my paint booth. Lots to think about over the next few weeks. Brutus may soon get listed in the flea-market unless someone comes knocking with cash first. It's a tough call but the opportunity to work on some of the rarest motorcycles in the world, preserve them for future generations while providing a segue into a job I can work for the rest of my days is very appealing at this point. More to come. :*sip*

    As always windshield time leads to a lot of time to listen to music... my other unrelenting passion. I had thrown a stack of CD's in the truck for the trip and gravitated to the Steel Wheels for most of the way there and back. A bunch of Indiana boys who made it big in Bluegrass. I hate to admit but I did not find them on my own. The wife of a fellow I used to road-trip with, who doesn't even live in Indiana, introduced me to them. :strum Thanks if you are lurking. :thumb

    Here's one I really like. When I'm on the road, many miles from home, songs like this usually get stuck on replay. Here's one to going home.



    And here's one to the life we live. Enjoy!



    Stay tuned!
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  5. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Sigh. Missed out on a great trip and a great evening of music.

    Hope I can correct that soon.

    I thought last fall was going to be crazy with the second of two daughters getting married in the space of four months, but this one has it beat. At least there has been no time to get bored.

    Beautiful work on the pieces you returned. Can't wait to see what you do with the ones you picked.

    Thanks for the music to start my day.
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  6. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Radian - Been through the daughter's wedding deal and there is no comparison. You doing it twice... absolutely no comparison. :D More trips to the museum in the near future. Probably November-ish. I'll ping you when the plans are made. Hopefully it will fall on a Saturday. Getting back that late on a Sunday made for a very long Monday. Thought you might enjoy the Steel Wheels. Cool that Trent Wagler(lead singer) is from Bean Blossom and the two guys that look like brothers are from Goshen, Indiana.
  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    JB, I envy you your opportunity, and your skills! I hope you take advantage of this and really enjoy those "retirement" years! :thumb
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  8. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Jim - Just getting caught up with some of my favorite ADV threads and posters after being out of the loop this summer. I owe Kip Kern a huge debt of gratitude for introducing me to Tom Reese and Ray Sterns of Moto-Armory. It's all on me now to take advantage of the opportunity. On my first visit I was shown some work by one of the restorers working for the museum and knew I had to bring my "A" game then start improving on that. I am one of a handful of restorers that the museum hires work out to and I'm definitely the low guy on the totem pole. They have plenty of work but Tom has very high standards. If all goes well maybe by age 62 I can walk away from collision work and start working full time for them. Retirement is not in my vocabulary but neither is working on crashed cars as I enter my golden years.

    You are a brave man! :D I just checked out your CLC thread... you are very brave. I like your blackout work and it may be the saving grace for such a homely looking motorcycle. Don't forget too that it was your Yamaha thread that was the inspiration to start posting my shop projects on the web. Thanks! :thumb
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  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    There is a fine line between brave and stupid. I have crossed that line more often than not. :shog

    Good luck with the new adventure, though I do not think you need luck! :thumb
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  10. ace1123

    ace1123 Adventurer

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    I loved reading through this, I've enjoyed all the music and the bike work is impressive as well!
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  11. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Thanks ace1123! Is that a Grom in your avatar? Cool bikes. Kim and I just bought a couple of Zuma 50X's. She wanted to start riding on her own and they are a good place for her to start. Absolutely a blast to ride a bike that you can use entirely up. :D
  12. ace1123

    ace1123 Adventurer

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    Yup thats a Grom, I love it so far. I just got it and I'm already looking for something bigger though, for around town its awesome but it just needs a little more power for real fun on the open road.
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  13. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    To say I have been busy would be an understatement. To date I have completed 7 bikes for the Moto-Armory. Five of those bikes will be featured in the Mecum Motorcycle Auction in Las Vegas this coming January. Two of the bikes will remain in the permanent collection. There were some stiff deadlines to meet since everything had to be prepped and photographed prior to shipment to the auction site. :nod

    I most recently restored tins for a 1941 Harley Davidson WR and a 1968 Penton Berkshire, plus some odd and ends of parts for another '68 Berkshire. I have some in-process photos for the WR but not much more since I spent almost every waking hour that wasn't dedicated to my day job or family to getting them done. I will post those in the next installment very soon.

    In the meantime they have already posted two of the bikes I painted. I snapped some photos of the parts before assembly(scroll back up to post #404) but couldn't get shots of the bikes assembled.

    Here they are:

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/LV0118-314847/1978-harley-davidson-mx250-flat-track/

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/LV0118-314855/1970-montesa-king-scorpion-250/

    I have invested some of the money saved from NOT traveling this summer and museum earned money back into the shop. Pics coming also in the next installment. And for those that thought Brutus might fall to the auction hammer as well... I am happy to say that I am back full-steam trying to cover some ground on that project! I think I have secured a full restoration on a 1948 Triumph Speed Twin starting in late January so I have a small window of opportunity to cover a lot of ground on Brutus. Fingers crossed! :thumb

    Kip and I made the trip to East Moline this past Saturday to deliver parts and bikes. It seems almost surreal to walk through the shop and have nothing to work on except my own bikes. A relief in some respects but only because it is temporary.

    During the many hours spent in the shop I discovered several new-to-me artists and have pretty much burnt up their CD's. Here's just one of the many songs I almost know all the words to now. There's no doubt that Bruce was a major influence on Bleu's music but it's all written from a West Texas, small-town point of view and in that sense I have really taken to his music.



    Stay Tuned!
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  14. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Great stuff! So happy to hear that we might get to Brutus unveiled in all its glory sometime! Thought it would be one of those "what could have been" bikes.

    Liking the Bleu track as well. Makes me want to grab the Strat and wail along with him.

    Say "hey" to Kip next time you get in touch. Hope to have the cigar box using the wood done before Feb.
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  15. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Joel - Did say hey to Kip. Anxious to see the guitar... hopefully in February!

    So I came back a couple months ago from the museum with a 1941 Harley WR flat-tracker. At that time they were unsure if it would be a permanent museum bike or if it would go to the Mecum auction. If you scroll back up to post #404 you can see it was purple. The original color on this bike when it was sold was black, straight black. There wasn't a lot of history prior to the 60's that was documented on the bike. It is 1-of-36 WR's built in 1941. It is numbers matching. It is 1-of-12 left in existence. It used to belong to Elvis Presley's motorcycle mechanic, Al McAlexander. It was restored by Johnny Ramsey. The history prior to this just isn't out there or possibly lost to time. It has obviously seen competition just from the repairs and modifications to the bike. The rear fender is not HD but the brace is and was angrily modified to fit the ribbed fender. The tanks have seen many repairs over the years just like the fender. As you can see...

    [​IMG]

    ... both tanks have taken their share of abuse. The right tank on the WR's were the oil tank. It was especially hard to get the tank back in shape due to the vent line running inside of the tank.

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    Right after coming home with the WR I ordered a new sandblaster from Eastwood. It arrived just in time. There is a real Brutus update coming soon and I'll show a shot of it assembled.

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    The rear fender was in worse shape. Just one look on the underside shows many repairs and all the welding was done in brass. There's really no restoring a fender like this once the metal has been contaminated with the brass. I could have tried to repair it in brass but it would have been an exercise in diminished returns. Except for the edges of the fender the bodywork in the fender was straight so I chose to "leave well enough alone" and not strip this piece but use their paintwork to finish blocking out all the imperfections.

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    As you can see the radius on each side if different but the fender has been shortened and the cut was not straight.

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    So I marked with sides...

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    ... and trimmed the tip.

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    The sides/edges of the fender had some waves in them. Using a little finesse and patience(wooden block and a clamp) I massaged them back to "nearly straight" without damaging the paint or cracking the filler.

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    All three pieces got 3 coats of single-stage, Jet-Black Imron. It was at this point the museum had decided to put it up for auction. The original plan was to do a 2-tone traditional HD panel-paint but since it was heading to the block they nixed the 2-tone and decided it might be more appealing if it was in the original color... just black. Had we known the competition history of the bike then duplicating it would have been proper but without it the original black would be the better choice.

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    Here is the bike assembled. I hope it brings them good money.

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/LV0118-315045/1941-harley-davidson-wr/

    While working on the WR a set of painted parts came for a 1968 Penton Berkshire. Mind you at this point we are getting close to the holidays and now I have two bikes to get ready plus some extra parts for a third bike.

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    I didn't take but a few photos of the parts for the Berkshire. I was balls-to-the-wall to get everything done and delivered before Christmas. With the family all coming in and the auction in January I had no time for documenting. I took this photo to send to the museum. They wanted all of the blistering and pitting removed from the pot-metal parts but hadn't said anything about the mold seam. These early pot-metal parts are notorious for blisters in the metal. Those aren't in the paint. I don't think they were quite this bad when sold new but over time and exposure to heat air pockets close to the surface will blister and also start to corrode from the inside. They chose to leave the mold seam but still remove all the imperfections. Good choice I believe, but some purists will disagree.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the first Berkshire I did for them, re-assembled and ready for the auction block.

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/LV0118-319566/1968-penton-100-berkshire/

    I've really taking a liking to this guy so here is some more Bleu Edmondson. His CD's have spent many an hour in the player over the last few months.



    So Christmas came and the reconnecting with family and friends was a welcome change. But just as important the relief of having nothing in the shop to work on but Brutus. As we said goodbye to the company and the holiday a call came form the museum, "Uh, we have another Berkshire we have decided we want repainted. Can you do it? Can you get it done in two weeks?" Well, we had no plans for New Year's except hiding out at home. I had a three day weekend coming to cover a lot of work so, "... could they have it delivered by Friday, the 29th?" The answer came at noon the next day when Fed-Ex showed up with another box of parts for this bike.

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/LV0118-315398/1968-penton-100-berkshire/

    Another Bleu song to end this posting.



    Stay tuned!
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  16. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    The Last Minute Penton

    This Berkshire was a later model bike with the enduro package. One of the things you'll notice is the airbox has been trimmed of the skirt. They found out right away that the skirt restricted airflow and plugged easily with mud so they began cutting them off on the later '68's.

    The tank they sent for the bike was a NOS tank. The other parts were original to the bike. The NOS tank had several dents and was going to have to be restored as well.

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    The first order of business was to rub the decals and send the info to Seller's Signs in Franklin, NC to have them reproduced.

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    The next order of business was to dis-assemble the shock and start sandblasting everything. As you can see the previous restorer had chosen to also paint the rubber isolators in the eyes of the shock and the rods themselves had a ton of overspray on them. :dirtdog

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    Everything certainly looks better in clean white metal. :nod

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    And the tank after blasting and repairs.

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    The left half of the airbox had a nasty dent where the cap seals to the box. This is pot-metal so straightening options are very limited. The chances of cracking are very high. With pot-metal you might bend it one way but you can't bend it back without it cracking... usually. I'm tempting fate here but follow along anyway just to see if I crash and burn. :amazon

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    I carefully placed two screw clamps with a piece of steel angle on either side of the bend.

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    Once the clamps were in place I applied a liberal amount of heat and slowly began applying pressure.

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    After heating and tightening it was allowed to cool completely. With the clamps relaxed the attempt removed about 90% of the bend and required very little filler to make the cap fit snug to the box. :happay

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    Here are some of the parts ready and sanded for paint. Note there is a second headlamp bucket in the picture. If this was a factory enduro it would have the large headlamp(red one). If it was a kit that was installed after 1970 then the small lamp would be correct. I won't know which one they chose until I see it run over the auction block but I think they're leaning towards the large one. It had been restored and was nice. The color was just a 1/4 shade off from the color I was using so I painted it with everything else to make sure everything was the same color.


    [​IMG]

    Parts that needed repair and bodywork were primed. Items like the shock absorber parts and the small headlamp bucket could be etch-primed and painted directly over in the same painting session. Here's the quest to paint the shocks to look like they have never been painted... which makes setting them up for paint a challenge. Here's a trick I have used with success. All the ingredients laid out.

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    The foam and the metal tube go inside the shock cover.

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    The hanging rod is bent to make a hook...

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    ... and stuffed up from the bottom side with the hook being seated fully in the foam sleeve. The preload adjusting ring presents a problem because it can't have paint build up on the side of it. I pre-etch-primed the adjusters then stuck them on a piece of foam which holds them nicely for painting and prevents paint from building up on the inside of the part.

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    Another hook was bent once the hanger was assembled. The upper shock eye was screwed on to the body and the rod and seal carefully taped up. From this point everything is ready to paint. It has just been over a week since I got the parts and I am painting! :0-0

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    Here's everything that only gets painted once. The tank is hanging in the booth and still needs 2-toned, striped, decaled and clear-coated.

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    There was a delay in getting the decals and pushed the final clear out to Saturday of the second week. The plan was to wake up early on Sunday, buff the tank and head west to meet someone from the museum half way between home and East Moline. Nobody was available but they had a driver that would meet me at my day job on Monday to pick up the parts. Mind you it has to be assembled and loaded on a truck headed for Las Vegas Tuesday morning.

    Talk about pushing the limits on time. :jive

    [​IMG]

    Lot of work. Very little time. A lot of luck and hard work. :pope Viola!

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    Another Berkshire under the bridge. And without having to drive half the day Sunday I kind of just crashed. :*sip* Bike was picked up the next morning and is now in Las Vegas. Not sure what day it will roll across the block but I'll be watching. The pictures currently shown on Mecum are the photos prior to repaint. Not sure if they will change before it rolls but at least I got photos of it this time around. :nod

    Whiskey Myers is also a new-to-me artist. This song called to me. My family is from south but I was born and raised in the north. However, the stories are the same. So many parallels in this song and the way I was raised and live by today. I'm not so crazy about the visual backstory paying in the background of this video even though the storyline is real. I think more of the song about the things I am proud of. Enjoy!



    Best of luck to the crew of the Moto-Armory at the Mecum auction! :thumb

    Parts for Brutus are in the new sandblaster. Stay tuned!



  17. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Great stuff, JB2! Beautiful work as is your usual.

    Just a few shots of my project. (You might want to ignore the pencil markings. Math and I are only marginally acquainted.)
    [​IMG]
    Solid body with chamber. Going to route out the neck pocket.

    The gift lumber has been cut to appropriate dimensions and this one is marked to indicate fret positions.
    [​IMG]

    Bought a vintage style pickup from C.B. Gitty for this one.

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    The box it is sitting on will be the body. To keep this motorcycle related--you can see my SV in the first shot right behind the table saw. :lol3

    Can't wait to see what you are doing with Brutus!
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  18. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    Joel - Looks like the cigar box guitar is coming along. February? Motorcycles and music go together but the added glimpse of the SV was nice!
  19. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,337
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    Joel - It was good to see you and Deb Friday night along with the aforementioned cigar box guitar along with several other ADVer's; Bhuff & Val and Carlos(who just transplanted from NC to Indiana). An eclectic group of friends all related through motorcycles or music... or BOTH! :nod

    Well, my garage was pretty much trash after working on the museum bikes. I took a week or so out of the shop then started re-organizing the garage by pulling out everything from the wall, one wall at a time. I placed the Brutus project front and center after the cleanup. I'll take a few months of down time before I take on anymore work to finish it.

    [​IMG]

    One of the things in the re-arranging of the equipment was to find a permanent home for the blasting cabinet. Tucks in nicely.

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    Hiding inside is the next piece of the build to receive attention and that is the seat pan. I had blasted it over at Kip's place last spring but never got around to painting it because of the work load I took on. I did some minor re-shaping and set it aside but lo and behold the humid Indiana summer applied a nice coating of "frost-rust". So back in the blaster for a final cleaning. It is ready for paint and upholstery!

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    I got a call from a friend last fall that he was hosting Micah Kesselring in February and would I also like to have a concert so he could do a double-show over the same weekend. Yes we said and the plan was set. Joel(@radianrider) had been gifted a nice slab of curly maple by a mutual friend, Kip Kern. His intent was to build several cigar box guitars out of the slab. I knew Micah played a cigar box and dropped the hint to Joel that "if" he had it finished that Micah might christen his guitar at the gathering. Wouldn't you know, just in the nick of time, Joel shows up at the concert with the completed guitar. I don't know how he did it. I think he was gluing the neck less than 48 hours before the show. :loco

    Anyways here's Micah Kesselring from the Hocking Hills of Ohio. He's 24 years old and is a student and performer of traditional blues. Old blues. Back in the 20's blues. Not something you'd expect from, dare I say, a kid. He plays a variety of guitars.

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    What is even more amazing is that he only played two cover songs during the night. Everything else he wrote. We had seating for 18 and filled every seat. We had a total of 24 people over the evening with 20 at one time. Overall this was one of the best house concerts we've ever had. The guy can flat play a guitar. Here he is on his own cigar box doing an original song while hooked up to a tiny "Pig Amp" provided by radianrider. You would not believe the sound the came out of this setup.

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    And the christening did happen. He's trying to dial in new strings on a new guitar so it took a minute or so to get all the strings on the same page. He not only arranged and played a normally acoustic song on Joel's newborn but signed it afterwards. You know Joel, Lou will be here again in October. You could bring it back and do the same with him and start collecting signatures of artists who played it. I did not get a picture of your guitar after Micah it signed. Maybe you'll post one?

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    Good times, I believe were had by all. Kim and I drove to Portland on Saturday to see him again at our friends home. :*sip*

    So my plate is clear and my garage is clean. I'm anxious to jump backing the Brutus project again. :happay

    Here's a few tunes from Micah... if you like the blues. Crank them up cause it's the blues and all. :kumbaya







    Stay tuned!
  20. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,084
    Location:
    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    JB2,
    We had a great time--in spite of the nerves. I was still assembling the guitar up to about an hour before we had to head your way. You may notice that the pickup I used wasn't the one I showed you earlier in the thread. Four days to go and I broke the original pickup. Had to get another right quick!

    Wasn't sure it was ready, but ready or not...

    Micah really made it sound good! I actually still have a lot of little things to do to get it where I want it. Gunstock oil on the neck--final filing of the frets--putting a finish over his signature to protect it, etc.

    Like the idea about having artists sign it, but there may be something to having another one for Lou to sign. I learned a lot on this one and intend for the next one to be better.

    Can't believe I left without making you show me Brutus! Got half way to the hotel and about kicked myself!

    Here's a shot of the CBG showing the donated wood and the signature.
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    ArdenLoneWolf, Buschog and JB2 like this.