Build up of a Suzuki Bearcat

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by Rizingson, May 23, 2015.

  1. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    About 5 years ago, I purchased a '67 Suzuki B105p (aka "Bearcat") which is a 120cc single two stroke. It was poorly rattle canned in some strange maroon metal flake that was down right ugly. However the bike was somewhat complete with only 896 original miles.

    Here's what it looked like when I got it home.
    [​IMG]
    It had spent it's life until the '90s running up and down the beaches of South Carolina. After getting it to fire up 5 yrs ago to see if the engine sounded OK, I rode it less than a mile because the fuel tank had the bottom rusted completely out, and I had to carry a portable tank while riding.:wink: After checking it out, I just put it in my project queue, while searching for parts that I'd need to bring it back to some kind of respectable machine.

    I finally took it apart a few weeks ago and sent it out for media blasting and paint. Even though it had originally been red, I decided to go with black, because I already have a nice red "Bearcat". Plus I recently got another red parts bike to help with parts as well.

    Here I'm sorting out the painted parts to get ready for assembly.
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    About the only thing not black is the injection oil tank.
    [​IMG]

    Here we have the swing arm, rear fender extension piece and front foot peg bar.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the replacement fuel tank, since the original was beyond repair. Notice how the fill pipe is not painted.
    [​IMG]
    After sealing the edge of the paint with a RC airplane type of paint made by Midwest Products P/N 65-4 it will prevent any lifting or bubbling of the paint from seepage or vapors. Once fuel get's under the paint, there is no saving the paint job. Learned this the hard way a while back. Here's the product I use to seal the edge of the paint where it meets the neck. If the neck is painted, there's no way to protect it.
    [​IMG]
    http://midwestproducts.com/products/clear-aero-gloss-paint-1-oz

    I always start a build by installing the triple tree and front forks.
    I was unable to find an NOS set of gaiters for the Bearcat, however a CL175 K6 Honda has the same size ends, length and number of ribs. The only problem was Suzuki has an exposed spring inside the boots that was slightly larger in diameter than the boot ribs. This may or may not be a problem as they do touch the rubbler.
    Forks after assembly.
    [​IMG]

    After putting in all 36 ball bearings, (18 top and 18 bottom.) I put together the triple tree. Almost forgot to put on the fork lock, which would have been impossible once the triple tree is in place.:evil
    [​IMG]

    The forks were then installed and tightened in with the pinch bolts. The newly polished handle bar brackets hold in the top of the forks.
    [​IMG]

    Next, the center stand is put on it's pivot bolt with a little fresh grease.
    [​IMG]
    Now that's it's starting to stand up I'll call it good till next update.
    #1
  2. jimroid

    jimroid Long timer

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    That is a really cool bike and you are doing a great job on it. I really would have liked to see some version of red instead of another black bike. Enjoy it, and ride the snot out of it.
    #2
  3. dpforth

    dpforth no inline fours

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    Kudos. You are to be commended for the attention you give to all those little old bikes. :thumb
    #3
  4. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Like I said, already have a red one, but here's a picture of it when I got it.
    The seat was changed to a longer seat from a B100p street bike with the same engine. Luggage rack was removed to accommodate the longer seat.
    [​IMG]

    And on the lift.
    [​IMG]

    As you can tell by the mileage, not even broken in!:evil
    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. krmn59

    krmn59 n00b

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    Awesome bikes, the red one is identical to my first bike. All except for mine was never that nice☺
    #5
  6. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Decided it was time to start putting the wiring harness into the frame, while I could still get my hands in there to pull things through to there proper location.
    Noticed that Suzuki used the same sub-contractor to furnish their wiring harnesses as Honda did during the same time period. (Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd) (Excuse the greasy finger's, pic was taken during dis-assembly)
    [​IMG]

    The date on this harness is 1966, but Bearcat B105p's weren't sold until '67 to about Sept of '68 when they were replaced by the KT120 Bearcat which then had a 3 spd with dual range transmission, while the B105p used a dual sprocket arrangement and 4 spd transmission. It was typical for the wiring harness's to be made and purchased 6 month's to a year in advance of being placed in a frame.

    One thing I always try to be aware of, is getting good grounding after new paint. I usually just use a die grinder and carefully remove paint where the pieces meet and can be hidden.
    Here I've made a good grounding path for the combination ignition switch. This bike, having a magneto ignition system will require the switch assembly to be grounded, if I plan to shut the motor down.:wink:
    [​IMG]

    Wiring harness is put in place as well as the half-wave rectifier inside the frame.
    [​IMG]

    As you can see the PO, cut the wire's prior to the headlight bucket as well as at the tail light.:eek1 Repairs will be made when tying everything in. Main harness comes through the front frame hole, while the horn wires through the second hole. I've also added the front fender in this picture.
    [​IMG]

    At this point, I went ahead and put the front wheel assembly together and installed it on the forks.
    [​IMG]

    With front wheel on, it's time to put on the swing arm after some new grease on the bushings. The rear shocks on a Bearcat are offset and always look kinda crooked to me, but somehow it always evens out visually once the muffler is in place along with the luggage rack. I've also threaded the tail/brake light wiring through the little channels in the frame.
    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. RicH2

    RicH2 Ric H2

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    Gezzzz.....how many bikes do you have ?

    And is that a neglected 1974 Kawasaki H2 I see ? Shame on you !!!
    #7
  8. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    The Green Kawasaki in the pic is a '73 H1D model. It's not being neglected, nor is any other of my bikes. More importantly they are made to run and being kept original. Some are survivors and others are rescues that eventually will go through a restoration, such as this Suzuki. Most of my bikes run and are ridden, if not they will be put into a proper long term storage condition. As far as how many, I am admittedly a collector but I keep that info between myself and Hagerty Insurance. Also that number could change tomorrow:evil.
    #8
  9. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Haven't been getting much done lately, since the sun has finally came out after about 3 weeks of rain:eek1. Taken time to catch up on mowing grass and getting a few of my bikes back to life and ridden again, after a long winter.

    Started by putting in a new grommet through the frame for the oil line passage and brake light wiring.
    [​IMG]

    Next I installed the coil inside the frame held by the 2 screws in the middle of this picture.
    [​IMG]

    Finally got to the rear fender extension piece, carefully grinding off some paint around the tail light bracket. This is a 2 wire tail/brake light so grounding must get back to the battery through the housing, light bracket, fender and finally the frame and battery.
    After it's all in place, I checked to make sure both filaments were working from the other end of the harness. I'd rather know now than chase down problems later. Here it is with brake light glowing.
    [​IMG]

    Always help's to have a wiring diagram around just in case. I like the picture type diagrams Suzuki and Yamaha used in the '60's as if you needed all the orientation to know what part is where. This one is probably the world's simplest design.
    [​IMG]

    Thought I'd go ahead and get the rear wheel assembly put on now so I can get it off the lift if necessary.
    Here it is, but I seem to be having a difficult time getting a decent picture of a black bike:huh It seems to just show a solid black silhouette or a reflective glare back if I use flash. (Must be too damn shiny:eek1)
    [​IMG]

    A closer shot of the dual sprocket arrangement. Both of my Bearcats have identical 72 tooth large sprocket and they were originally sold in different regions of the country. Part's manual's show only up to 50 teeth, so I don't really think they are from Suzuki. I've never put a chain on the large sprocket, but would imagine it could be a pretty decent hill climber with it.
    [​IMG]

    Also put on the rear pegs.
    [​IMG]

    Now it was time to find a spot to sit down and polish some more pieces.
    One of the handlebar perches.
    [​IMG]
    #9
  10. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Time for another update, although this project seems to get delayed a lot recently. Was planning on having it ready for a local show June 7th but that ain't gonna happen anymore. Gonna start getting a couple other bikes dusted off for that.

    Got in a new NOS chrome mud shield that I went ahead and put on. Many of the '60's Suzuki had the metal mud flap, and very few survived without being bent in half. The original mudflap on this bike was no exception, and just wasn't worth trying to salvage. After all it's only money$$$$$:D
    [​IMG]

    I was able to hang the motor myself today, although it's not very heavy, it can be a problem wedging it in, since the frame has to go in behind the left case half.
    [​IMG]

    With the chain on the sprockets, the rubber guides were installed. Then the newly polished left case cover...... Dang that's bright!:clap
    [​IMG]

    Another view of the skid plate in place with the chrome braces supporting the front. The brake pedal had to be removed again, so I could get the installation sequence right. The only proper sequence is : skid plate, then foot bar and finally the braces and brake pedal.
    [​IMG]
    Right side case still needs more polish to balance out the bling!:wink:
    Also, some may notice that there are two oil fill caps. The Bearcat is filled from the front cap as the muffler is in the way of the rear cap, unlike the Magnum or B100p street version with the low swept muffler.
    Later everyone............
    #10
  11. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Back onto the project this morning, and decided to finally install the injection oil tank, with new sight glass and seals as well as the correct decal.
    [​IMG]

    Next it was time to finish up the electrical repair as well as final testing of the components. Appears to have a rectifier problem, will work on that again later.
    Head light bucket is installed with speedometer and cable routed to front wheel. Horn installed also. On the plus side, it kicks over with a nice fat blue spark at the plug:clap
    [​IMG]

    Head light and all bulbs also wired in and working with switch. Was hoping my new clutch and front brake levers would have arrived by now, so I can finish installing the rest of the cables.
    [​IMG]

    A straight ahead picture of the unique shaped Suzuki headlight.
    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Continuing with this build again, carburetor was cleaned again and installed. Then covered with the always hard to find, Suzuki Carb cover sets.
    [​IMG]

    Next up is the installation of new clutch and front brake levers followed by routing and clipping in all cables.
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    Cables terminating at the clutch, oil injection pump, throttle slide and enrichment/choke valve.
    [​IMG]

    With cables tucked away, now we can mount the tank in it's rubber cushions.
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    New petcock and fuel line was intalled.
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    Next I bolted on the original skid resistant/suede seat. Good seats are next to impossible to find.
    [​IMG]

    Tank chrome sides panels were installed next.
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    Followed by the badges and knee grips.
    [​IMG]

    ....and the left side as well
    [​IMG]
    next update soon as this project should be wrapped up!!!
    #12
  13. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Time to finalize the Bearcat build so new projects can begin again.
    Moving on with the muffler system, the header pipe is put into place but left loose for easy movement as needed.
    [​IMG]

    Next the luggage rack is installed since it shares a supporting mount with the muffler. After I got the muffler on, I discovered I had another very nice muffler and header pipe I'd probably been saving for this project for a couple of years. Don't know if I'll put that one on later as this one's is also in great shape.
    [​IMG]

    Moving back to the left side, the battery and tool holder bracket is placed in frame.
    [​IMG]

    Finally the side cover is put in place, until I decide to put in a battery.
    This is the final picture before taking it off the lift:clap
    [​IMG]

    One of the things I've mentioned before, was the 72 tooth power gear that both of my B105p's have installed, instead of the standard 50 tooth larger sprocket.
    This larger sprocket would have interfered with the chrome chain guard, so they have disappeared due to PO's. Two years of searching hasn't turned up a suitable guard, but I know they are out there, just not for sale:(:

    After over 3 inches of rain in the last 12 hours it finally stopped long enough for the sun to barely peak out. So I rolled it out side anyway for some more pics, but was disappointed in the lighting.
    First, as I've done with all my build threads, I gotta show the closest picture I could find from a brochure featuring a Black model B105p.
    [​IMG]
    And for comparison my Black Bearcat!
    [​IMG]
    .....and the left side
    [​IMG]

    As you can see the original mileage is low as well. Not even broken in.
    [​IMG]
    Since I've already got a nice running Red Bearcat, which I ride quite regularly, I'm not sure what I'll do with this one. Maybe just display it on the wall of my shop!.....Oh boy, I can already hear the groans of the "ride 'em, don't hide 'em" crowd:rofl
    #13
  14. CJ3Flyer

    CJ3Flyer Long timer Supporter

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    Lyle, beautiful work! You sir, "have skills". Neat little bike...

    I have never operated a bike with the dual rear sprocket set-up. Obviously you swap chains and on those older design, lower HP bikes the chain is probably a std chain with a master link vs a modern O-ring, endless design. I understand that part...

    Does the countershaft sprocket ride 'loosely' on the splines so that it can slide in and out a bit? Do you pull the cover and move some c-clip to properly align the countershaft? Or is it centered and it runs with 'less-than-ideal' chain alignment all of the time?

    I have wondered about this for a long time and you seem like the guy to ask:D

    Thanks,
    Chris
    #14
  15. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Thanks for the compliment Chris. The primary sprocket aligns with the smaller rear sprocket and remains there. So it has a slight misalignment when using the larger sprocket. The rider carries a small length of #428 chain in the tool kit that is added to the main chain to get enough length to cover the larger sprocket. The chain then has two master links in place. I don't recall if the primary sprocket had any excessive wobble, probably not as it has a nut and flat washer to tighten it to the counter shaft against a spacer, rather than a clip. There is also a large rubber mud protector where the chain enters behind the left case cover, which is a pain to put in place, so I don't think it would be fun to take it off regularly anyway.
    #15
  16. Neil E.

    Neil E. Been here awhile

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    Nice work. I had a 1968 Suzuki 120 as my second bike. My first bike was a 1966 Suzuki 80 with a high pipe. The 120 had a long seat with no parcel rack. It must have been the street version with a low pipe. I'll always remember the muted exhaust note of the smaller Suzukis. These bikes were a lot fun in their day. They never did anything particularily well, but were very reliable and cheap to operate. I recall going to the local filling station and putting in 10 cents worth of gas to top up the 80cc bike.
    #16
  17. CJ3Flyer

    CJ3Flyer Long timer Supporter

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    :D Thanks... I have always wondered... Adding a section and using two master-links makes perfect sense.
    #17
  18. Gtinman

    Gtinman n00b

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    Is there any chance I can get to see your pictures of the build? Picture links are dead for me.. :( I'm starting my B120P teardown. its a black 1966
    Thanks!
    #18
  19. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

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    Awhile back Photobucket pulled the plug on any linking of pictures to other sites such as forums, unless you paid about $400 dollars a year. They really killed forums that don't host pictures. I've decided not to go back to the extensive work of re-linking from another storage site as this was the second time it happened to me. Sadly I've decided to stop posting pictures of builds etc in most forums, instead mostly sharing only text replies on a limited basis. I'm now mainly using Face Book and am a member in approx 30 different Japanese vintage bike enthusiast groups. The Face Book format doesn't really allow for a continuing build thread, although it is highly active world wide and can be a great social source for like minded people.

    This is a link to a "Photobucket Fixer" extension for Chrome - https://chrome.google.com/webstore/s...bucket%20fixer

    There is also one available for Firefox - https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/fir...obucket-fixer/

    These do work! It makes all the dead photos alive again, so you can view them as usual. It works only for the computer that has it installed, and doesn't fix the thread itself.
    #19
  20. Thunderbutt

    Thunderbutt Been here awhile

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    I can't believe I have passed over this thread so many times without realizing it! Our first bike was a 1967 B100P. My older brother and I came home from school one afternoon and there it was parked in the garage. Dad bought it from a co-worker for $150.00(in 1968). I learned how to ride on that little bike as well as my two brothers, three step sister s, and half a dozen cousins. We rode it on farm roads several years until I got my license, and then it was my daily transportation. Have no idea how many thousands of miles we put on that little bike. And it NEVER broke. Hope you have as much fun with yours.
    #20
    Rizingson likes this.