Camp Table

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by Jamie Z, Nov 15, 2019.

  1. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Anyone carry and use a proper camp table?

    There's not much more that I like than to have a nice big picnic table at my camp. It makes cooking and eating easier, and also helps setting up and packing easier, as it offers a place to lay out gear and organize.

    But mostly I wild camp, or stealth camp, and I don't have any sort of table available to me. In the past, I've used my side cases, or I find some logs laying around, and use those things as ad hock tables to eat from and cook on, even though it doesn't work very well. Or I cook on the ground and eat while holding my plate.

    But I've been looking at lightweight camping tables. This is a hard one for me since I normally like to travel as light as possible, and adding a TABLE to my kit at first seems unnecessary.

    So I'm looking for words of experience. Do you carry a table? Do you consider yourself a light packer? Do you stealth camp? What do you use the table for?

    Kermit makes a table: https://www.kermitchair.com/products/store/the-kermit-wide-table

    [​IMG]

    And since I've got a Helinox chair, I've been looking at one of their camp tables: https://www.rei.com/product/158007/helinox-table-one-camping-table-hard-top

    [​IMG]

    Thoughts? Ideas? Experiences?

    Jamie
    #1
  2. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    I carried one of those Kermit tables for 2 months of riding and camping a couple years ago. We used it twice. I gave it away when I got back. I think one of the times we tried to set it up, it had gotten wet and swelled. It was a struggle to get it put together. Once it dried out, it was ok.
    #2
  3. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Couple ideas beyond a typical table...

    My last 2 bikes had aluminum cases and I cut a bbq grill to fit inside my top case. Once at camp I place/clipped the bbq grill between the cases. this becomes the table/cooking area. The grill only took up 1/4" of space.

    Another time I used a large pelican case as my trunk. I screwed 1 of these on each corner and then when setting upI screwed a dowel in it for a table. If the dowel is strong enough, the case can also become a chair.

    [​IMG]
    #3
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  4. EvilClown

    EvilClown Reality show stunt double Super Moderator

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    Believe your answer is here...

    Just a matter of you 'allowing' yourself to bring it along as a self described light packer. From there it's simply a matter of finding a table that suits your needs.

    Freestanding?

    Attaches to the bike for support?

    Utilizes side boxes?

    The more I travel the more I've reduced the size of the load but there are some things that I bring 'just because' - like a big ol' Kermit if I'm going to a place where I'm going to want a comfortable chair.

    For you it can be your table. You've earned it.:deal
    #4
  5. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    I have the soft top Helinox table and find it quite useful, well made and sturdy. I would like to have the hard top version if I were buying today, but can't justify replacing it just because. I will say that it has limitations; it is light weight which is good, but it also means it tends to be a bit unsteady especially on uneven ground. I use it mainly as an eating platform and a spot to hold a beverage at the campfire. The fabric top is not cooking or hot pot safe, nor is it really stable enough for me to trust putting a cookstove on. If I have a picnic table available, I will use it to set up my cooking gear on, if not, my side cases make a more stable platform for that job.
    #5
  6. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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    I picked up a Tekology camp table a couple years ago- Aluminium slat top 13 1/2" by 15 1/2" and 12 inches high, packed size is 17 1/2", 5" x 3" weighs 1.8 lb. At around $30 it you might see how it works for you. They also have a medium sized one at 16" high for $45.
    #6
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  7. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer Super Supporter

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    I used a fabric top table (china special...bought from amazon for $40ish). While it work just fine, packed size was almost 2 feet long. During a couple month long trips, used the table a handful of times. All-in-all, decided that it really wasnt worth the work to pack and set up when I have other options around.
    camp table.jpg
    #7
  8. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I was looking at the hard top, but I can't find anywhere that says if it's safe to cook on.
    #8
  9. Bad Dad

    Bad Dad Been here awhile

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    Been using one of these for 10 years.

    Screenshot_20191117-151400_Samsung Internet.jpg
    #9
  10. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer Supporter

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  11. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Guess that means you like it? Seems kind of low.

    This just arrived today.

    78B3FD60-C05B-4C42-9B84-0CB7978EDBA9.jpeg

    I was looking at the Helinox table, but it sells for over $100. This one was $30 with free shipping. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HJ234E0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_tWB0DbDJAPZ8M

    I haven’t used it, just set it up. It feels pretty sturdy and it’s really light and packs fairly small. I’ll play with this in camp and see if it fits my needs.

    Jamie
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  12. Bad Dad

    Bad Dad Been here awhile

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    What size did you get?
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  13. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I got the small.

    The table top is 15.5” x 13.5” and it’s 12.5” high.

    It does seem smallish, but my stove and a few other small things fit on top, and that’s really what I’m looking for. Previously I’d been using various rocks, logs, or just setting everything on the ground.

    9B21A71F-254D-4F5B-A418-5BC67B09E21A.jpeg

    Jamie
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  14. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    That’s the trouble. Pack size for that table is 28” long. I want all my stuff to fit inside my panniers. As a rule, I don’t strap stuff to the outside on my bike.

    Jamie
    #14
  15. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer Supporter

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    nowhere in your OP do you state that as a requirement
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  16. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    That's a requirement for me, sure. Other people have different thoughts and ideas. I'm curious what other people use and how they use it.

    Jamie
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  17. Brun

    Brun Been here awhile

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    My solution: When I was thinking about racks for my soft luggage system it occurred to me that if the racks were connected by means of a horizontal surface I would have a table, and 'throw-over' racks that didn't have to stay on the bike.

    [​IMG]

    The frame is made from 8mm stainless rod and 25x3 flat. Top is 9mm marine ply.

    [​IMG]

    The bags hang on to the subframe ...

    [​IMG]

    .. and extra straps over the table tension everything up.

    [​IMG]

    The really nice thing about having skinny legs on the table is that it can be pushed into the ground to make the table level. I also carry another bit of plywood which becomes a shelf (or 'magazine rack' if you like).

    brun.jpg

    Here's the old dear, well laden for a 4 day camp in the bush:

    luggage 2.jpg
    #17
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  18. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer Super Supporter

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    Wow, that's a really nicely kitted out system. Well done!


    #18
  19. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I have a SnapOn collapsible table I was given. (Plate not included)
    [​IMG]
    They were about £20 at the time. It is a not very heavy, but packs as long as the legs. The top slats are fixed together with elastic and roll into a slimish shape.

    I gets used when we are base camping - up to six weeks, otherwise it stays home. Once levelled, works OK for proper cooking. Some times we pick up the cheapest chairs from the nearest supermaket, along with a frying pan and real glass glasses (we camp in a wine area).

    I think an improvement would be to saw an inch or two off the legs. a) pack size would be smaller, and b) would be a better height for working at while sitting down.

    The guzzi is from the days when road bikes all looked similar, little to no plastic, so lots of nooks and crevices, places to strap stuff like this.
    #19
  20. Big D

    Big D Sunny SoCal

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    Have taken this small lite 10x12" table when I knew I would be camping in the wilds. Can use as stool also. Out in the wilds you only have what you bring. On a motor cycle you are limited by space. Cooking on a small table is so much better than the ground. You are still on your knees, but its better. Don't count on finding the perfect flat rock or tree stump. Got this one in Quartzite AZ in January a couple years back. Was moto camping on BLM land, no nothing. enjoy 07GSA Sunny SoCal
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #20