Camping Axe / Hatchet recomendations

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by onesaintsfan, Nov 18, 2015.

  1. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

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    its a shame nobody told ya fiskars come in different sizes,,,:lol3

    i admit i do really like my "heritage" choppers (gransfors, husqvarna, wetterlings) ,,, but a fiskars x7 is what packs on the bike, x11 is nice too but a bit more than what i need for a small campfire.
  2. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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  3. Oddfellow

    Oddfellow Beasty Rider Supporter

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    Back when I made my living as a carpenter I used to carry an Estwing Rigger’s Axe. It was really only good for scaring people, especially when you were out doing cornice jobs! Best use I ever found for it was sticking the blade between the jamb and the cripple to adjust reveal when setting doors. Wasn’t a very good hammer, decent axe, but then I was always partial to wooden handles.
    [​IMG]
  4. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    ha ha - well scaring people counts for something! I use the estwing (not that model) for splitting firewood all the time. Truth is, the handle is there mostly so you can knock the ax out if becomes too wedged. Mostly I place the ax head where I want it on the log, and whack it with another log - usually splits by the time the head is just buried. The metal tang handles can also break through wood if it only partially splits. Since it's all one piece it will never loosen. Makes a decent hammer for putting in stakes.

    Wood or metal - an ax is a simple useful tool that doesn't need to be fancy or expensive - a good wedge, and rock - you can split most anything:-)
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  5. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

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    i agree an ax doesnt need to be fancy or expensive,, but there IS value there.

    the estwing in the link above,,, meh, never got on with estwing. IMOP the fiskars x7 is a better tool all around, better edge, better steel, better wedge shape, lighter,,, and its $10 less.
  6. allowishish

    allowishish Boof Master

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    ^^^
    I agree Fiskars over estwing
    my gransfurs goes with me everywhere. (bike/LR or backpack)

    my Hults bruks stays in the LR
  7. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    Looks nice. If the estwing ever dies, I'd definitely give it a look.
  8. KT MOTOMAN

    KT MOTOMAN Adventurer

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    I have the Gerber camp axe(15 or more years old now looks like the current 14" hatchet). The Fiskars looks almost identical, so id say either one is good. Use for lots of odd jobs around camp. Cutting/splitting fire wood to splitting a white tailed deer pelvis. Holds a nice edge. Seems prices have went up since I last purchased mine. Wow $60+ for a hatchet seems high.
  9. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    Fiskars X7. Great little camp axe. I've also got an Estwing 16" camp axe...a nicely made axe but I don't really like the geometry for some reason and it's a lot heavier than the X7 for bike camping duties.
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  10. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

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    you might be surprised,,, same parent comapny and design but fiskar is made in finland where gerber is made in asia. seems trivial i know (and i aint knocking asia) but main difference is the steel used,,, with fiskars getting the better stuff.
  11. AZQKR

    AZQKR Long timer

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  12. JStory

    JStory Long timer Supporter

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    I was drooling over this at a woodworking store one day. Showed up at christmas. I have the best wife.

    hatchet.jpg
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  13. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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  14. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

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    For many decades I have used a cheep "28 inch Boy's Axe" I cut the handle down to a length that fits my trunk or pannier. They have a little larger head than most hatchets and make short work of making kindling.
  15. oldoval

    oldoval Energy Vampire

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    Gerber Myth hatchet. You're not going to bring down a forest with it, but it's a great size for small jobs and if you give it a sharp edge it will tear through larger wood surprisingly quickly. Choke up on it and use the finger hole and you can do fine stuff like whittling and shaving kindling. Cheap too.

    [​IMG]
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  16. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Fiskars x7 is currently down to $21.59 at Amazon.

    JR356
  17. Omi

    Omi Out of step

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    I have several hatchets, but my favorite one by far is my Wetterlings hunter's hatchet. It is just about the perfect size and shape, and it is so incredibly sharp. After ten plus years of regular use, the blade is still sharp enough to shave your arm hair.
    [​IMG]
  18. DyrWolf

    DyrWolf Long timer Supporter

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    4FE56E08-18E3-4DE1-8362-8E19ABFF50A0.jpeg 8D5F8E52-3ACF-4EF5-930F-F960992BE725.jpeg
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  19. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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    from my old post in a similar adv axe thread, coincidentally, i was looking at these axes just the other day...

    i like a 3/4 axe, also known as a boy's axe, in a Hudson Bay pattern for an all around hunting/camping/travel axe. these axes typically are fitted with a handle in the 23-27" range, with the middle of that range being the most common. the 1 3/4# distinctive head design affords a degree of over strike protection.

    i've carried these Hudson Bays on the bike many times, as well as on many other expeditions, particularly in Canada. personally, i view the 3/4 axe as a much safer tool than the hatchet, remember, it's a tool that a child was expected to master without injury. an adult should be able to use a boy's axe without drawing blood.

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    from the left...

    Council Hudson Bay-purchased new some years ago, known for their flawless hickory handles, USA made, now at about $50 they are still the best value around in a new axe of this type.

    L.L.Bean Hudson Bay-circa 1940s, manufacturer unknown, advertised as their outfitter axe, could have been made by Norlund. Bean is not much into axes anymore.

    Eddie Bauer Hudson Bay-purchased new in 1967, manufacturer unknown, from back in the day when Eddie Bauer was still alive and his company sold expedition grade gear, not yuppie doodle clothing.

    Wetterlings Forest Axe-purchased new in Inuvik, NWT years ago, but since then also available in the States, a good value in a Swedish axe, Wetterlings has been purchased by Gransfors, they also reportedly make the Husqvarna branded axes. purchased at the auto parts store there, the guy at the counter said to soak the head in antifreeze for a few days before use, i'd never heard that mentioned before.

    Collins Legitimus Hudson Bay-circa 1910, considered by some to be the holy grail of the modern forged steel hudson bay axe, distinctive notch on the underside of the head, stamped "Abercrombie" on the reverse of the Collins distinctive logo, from back in the day when Abercrombie & Fitch were known as expedition outfitters, and not purveyors of fake rugby shirts.

    you can see from the photo that the early axes were finely crafted in comparison to the later versions. overall, the early axes were beautifully shaped and balanced. these were serious working tools and the buyer would not accept less. all the old axes can be found used, and often pretty cheap. keep on the lookout. beware new axes that carry some of the old names-they're just chinese crap. Norlund, Marbles, Collins, are examples.

    adding new blazes with a Council Hudson Bay to a centuries old high water portage in NW Ontario. we were in there collecting data for a portage mapping project across an area known as the Little North. this portage hadn't been used for decades, maybe as much as 75 years. rugged county to bushwhack.

    [​IMG]
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  20. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I read lots of reviews of the Granfors bruks, salivated at the pictures, then got down the price... For the minimal use put an ax to, far too much.
    I picked up a cheap fibreglas handled ax for smashing up pallets for kindling, what a piece of shit. Sharpen it , and it was blunt before you picked up the first piece of wood - a real example of you get what you pay for. Except is wasn't all that cheap - just far too expensive for what it delivered.

    Popped into a hunting shop because they had Tramontina machettes - they are really good at what they are designed for, and trimming down the garden in autumn, but not knocking in tent stakes. I can sharpen a stake to make bean poles in seconds with the tramontina - another great tool.
    They also had a display of another Swedish ax I had never heard of - Hultafors. So I bought one. I got the bottom of the range price wise. About $25 then, maybe another $5 now.
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    https://www.knivesandtools.co.uk/en/ct/buy-a-hultafors-axe.htm A UK seller.
    The hand forging wasn't as neat as the Grandfors. At the price, I wasn't expecting that much. The haft was well mounted, nice straight grain and well balanced. A bit of a polish, then off to work, sitting in the sun doing some splitting for kindling. To say I was a-mazed is an understatement. Not only razor sharp, it kept its edge like it was never going to let go. Even when I had finished 3 or 4 sackfuls, it was still sharp. Razor sharp. Really impressed.
    Came with a rather chintzy, but real leather scabbard, which along with the slightly rough forging, was really the only things to wish were improved. The important things, the fine steel, the balance and heft were all I would ever expect from an ax. Factor in the price point and it is a marvel.

    They also had a smaller ax, similar sized head but much smaller handle, good only for kindling?

    edit: just found the Hults home website, with all products and US dealer list
    http://hultsbruk1697.se/retailers/