Camping gear for 2

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by Maddevill, May 19, 2017.

  1. Maddevill

    Maddevill Adventurer

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    Ok, so I see lots of ideas for solo camping, but if I tried to sneak out without my wife there'd be hell to pay. So I'm looking for recommendations for a 2-3 man tent that packs down small, really small. 3 season mainly. We travel on a ZX14 that has soft sidebags and a Coocase rear trunk on a DL650 rack. I also use a large tank bag. So what's the hot set up?

    Mad
    #1
  2. penwright1166

    penwright1166 Adventurer

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    Eureka Apex 2XT Tent - 2-Person, 3-Season - ORANGE ( ) I just order 1


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  3. Newfiebullet

    Newfiebullet Been here awhile

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  4. jeepjake01

    jeepjake01 Adventurer

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    Here is a pic of our 10 day camping setup. Right blue bag is a marmot force 3p. With 2 20 inch pads In the tent there is about 6 inches on either side. Plenty of head and foot room. That includes foot print and poles. Take the poles out and it would compress way smaller. [​IMG][​IMG]

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  5. TuonoBiker

    TuonoBiker Long timer

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    :beerMy tent is a Mountain Hardwear LightWedge 2 person....not a great tent for getting in and out and its too small for the 2 of us...but Mrs.Tuonobiker is 5 foot nuthin' and a flyweight. But, I will chime in a suggest you go with down bags for compression which saves volume and then I'd be looking at the Thermarest NeoAir mattresses. If you can stand the small 3/4 length mattress, they roll up smaller than a 1 quart size Nalgene water bottle.

    Wife and I have spent quite a few full-week to 10 day vacations on the GSA since 2012 when we bought it and we usually camp. I sort of don't care about money when it comes to buying gear...doesn't mean I just go and buy the most expensive thing out there. I hunt for the best equipment that I think will work; I then hunt for the best deal / price and then I buy it. What we've saved in hotel costs on one week of camping MORE than pays for really good sleeping bags, mattresses and a couple Helinox chairs. And once you have the equipment, it keeps paying back in dividends every time you use it. That's my theory, at least.
    #5
  6. Chrismcp12

    Chrismcp12 Been here awhile

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    Big Agnes copper spur 3 p. You can get a lighted version or add lights later.
    No, really.


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  7. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Unless you want to be REALLY cozy with the wife,get a 3 person tent.

    Second the recommendation for the BA Copper Spur series.
    Another good one would be a MSR Mutha Hubba,or the smaller Hubba Hubba with the optional vestibule.

    JR356
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  8. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    There's not hot setup or one size fits all. It's all a compromise of size, weight, comfort, and cost. Hundreds of ways to skin this cat.

    Most quality tent makes will have a 2 and 3 person or more of the same model tent. You'll need a 3p for the two of you and many will be marginally larger than the 2p. Being 2up everything is about efficiency and packed size. Consider pole lengths as well.
    Quality down bags or quilts and pads can be comfortable and pack small.

    If you're taking 2 bikes in a ZX14 and a Strom, you're golden. Someone takes the tent, and each person takes their own gear.



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  9. PeteAndersson

    PeteAndersson Swede

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    I usually pack the poles, pegs and the fabric separately, it's a lot easier to fit in the bags that way. The whole package doesn't need to be squeezed in to one place. Poles and pegs don't have to be dry so they can travel strapped on the outside if necessary. Take in to your planning that the riding gear takes up a lot of space, not ideal if you want a really small tent and don't like to leave your kit out in the rain.
    An absolute necessity for me is a dry-pitch design and good guy out points, that way foul weather stays on the outside even if pouring down when I set up camp and the fabric stays taut even in high winds.
    #9
  10. TuonoBiker

    TuonoBiker Long timer

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    Another thing I learned was to buy two separate stuff sacks...one for the tent and one for the rainfly. This really helps keep the tent body dry when you're packing away a wet tent fly.

    Wife and I spent 10 days on the road from PA to Nova Scotia...8 / 10 days camping...every night either rained or the morning dew was so heavy that it may as well have rained. By the end of that trip, we were ready for a dry hotel. Actually, the 1st night on the road was in a hotel since it was a torrential downpour. I refused to camp since we'd have been setting up in a downpour. The 2nd night in a hotel was mid way through the trip...towards the end, we kept camping because we're both stubborn that way and were determined to see it through to the end.

    Anyway, my point was that keeping the rainfly in a separate water-resistant stuff sack (Sea to Summit is the brand) really helped keep everything dry-ish...not to mention the benefit of being able to pack the parts in different saddle bags if necessary...a handy option.
    #10
  11. anotheroldfart

    anotheroldfart Been here awhile

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    THIS. Rule of thumb is for one person, get a 2 man tent, 2 people - a 3 man tent. When it rains, you do want your gear inside the tent, right? A good heavy tent footprint is a must.
    #11
  12. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    The difference in packed size between a 2 person & 3 person tent is minimal. A few dozen square inches of fabric add very little to the package, but provide big benefits when its in use. Pitch & take down time are also virtually identical. Go with a 3 person.

    2 doors (with 2 vestibules) prove very useful. One person can enter/leave without crawling over the other one.

    I've always found Eureka to be an excellent compromise of quality, features & design versus cost.
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  13. MoogLover

    MoogLover Been here awhile

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    I love my North Face Tadpole. Packs fairly small and is fairly light without breaking the budget. Its a 2 person, but a real two person, not like others which were more like 1.5 persons. Comfortable to sit in, can't stand up. They have a new version out which i believe is a few inches higher and wider. Just my 2 cents
    #13
  14. armourbl

    armourbl Adventure Life

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    I can survive in a 2 person tent with my wife, but keep in mind she is small. I wouldn't dare try it with another person of my equal in size. She is a full foot shorter than me and about half my weight. That leaves plenty of spare room for gear inside the tent and I don't mind her being close to me.

    I've still never done a motorcycle trip with her camping though. She likes the creature comforts, so car camping is about as far as we've taken it so far. I imagine camping for 2 from one bike would make for quite a load to carry. Maybe fine for pavement destinations, but any dirt or adverse conditions wouldn't be very practical in my opinion.

    ben
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  15. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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  16. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I camp almost all the time with my girlfriend, 2up on the bike. In the 12 years we've been doing this, the latest version of our setup consists of a eureka mountain pass 3 tent(2 doors, 2 vestibules, and the fly covers the tent opening, keeping rain out when getting in and out of tent), 2 kelty down sleeping bags, 2 big agnes air matresses or 2 small thermarests(depends on mood), sometimes a kelty tarp(great for hanging out on a rainy evening), 2 alite butterfly chairs. This list will invariably change, as it has changed during the past 12 years. New equipment is always coming down the line. There is no one setup that would work for everyone, it all comes down to what works for YOU and your partner.
    #16
  17. squish

    squish Out of the office.

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    When tent camping, if you can stand the weight and size always add a person to the count, this makes it more comfortable.
    For two, I get a 3p tent. Look toward the backpacking section, and buy tents in the middle of winter, especially just after the first of the year
    that's when last years models are on close out. I like tents with vestibules, two if possible so you have a place to get out of the weather and store your gear out of the weather.

    The good news is if you are in a larger town you might be able to rent gear, do that to figure out what you like and don't like.
    And if you don't camp all that often sometimes it's just cheaper to rent the tent each time you go.

    In the 3p, 3 season tents there are some small tents the biggest thing is going to be pole length, so double check that.
    If it's wet where you are riding, I'd consider going up to a small 4p tent, it makes it much nicer to be inside if it's raining outside

    A lightweight tarp can make rain camping a little easier to deal with. if it's dry then a smaller tent works ok, since you aren't in it as much.
    #17
  18. 1nvent

    1nvent n00b

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    Hey dude. Travelling with a tent is a wonderful idea. You are going to like it very much, as I did. I've been travelling through North America a couple of years ago with 2 friends of mine and it's one of the best adventures in my whole life. If you need to choose a small tent for 2-3 people, you can see the options on https://wildproofgear.com/ - here you will find everything that you need. Just take a tent that you can afford and go ahead! Take care of yourselves in the trip and good luck.
    #18
  19. Klinc207

    Klinc207 To PERU!

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    IMG_6026.JPG Check out the 2 person bags and pads from Big agnes- We use an older Big Agnes 3 person tent with a large vestibule and 2 person sleeping bag and mat. It all packs down smaller then 2 bags, pads etc.
    #19
  20. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    A wise man on this forum once pointed out that if any given 2 man tent packs to the size of a loaf of bread, the 3 man version of that same tent will pack to the size of a loaf with 3 slices added. The extra few square inches of cloth required to increase the size of the tent add very little to it's packed size/weight. Virtually no increase in set-up or take down time either, but the extra interior space can prove priceless.
    #20