Camping Saw

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by BIG-E, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

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    Speaking from experience I would recommend a folding bow saw. I have a Boreal 21 folding bow saw and it's a great tool for cutting firewood while motorcycle camping. Lightweight, small, compact, and easy to assemble. It easily cut's up to 6 inch diameter logs with no problem. Takes about 2 seconds to go from stowed to open position and the optional carrying case has a compartment for spare blades if you happen to break a blade. I wish I would of found this saw sooner. https://agawacanyoninc.com/
    #41
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  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    If you can do without the folding requirement (comes with a blade guard) a Bahco pruning saw works devastatingly well.
    [​IMG]
    Cuts on the pull stroke, so much smoother - perhaps a tip for bow saw users? - the curve means you don't have to consciously push down this being very important. I was amazed at how few strokes were needed to cut a 4" limb (with tree attached) out of the road first time I used it.
    Mine does get used mostly for actual pruning, so usually on green wood, still after about 5 years, still sharp despite the neglect and occasional abuse.
    Only slightly longer than the large Silky, they are a dream - an expensive dream.
    Light and easy to fit on a bike or stow inside a vehicle with the guard. Cheap too.
    #42
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  3. Beemer Dood

    Beemer Dood Been here awhile

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    Problem with a triangular bow shape, like the Sven and many others, is that it limits you to cutting smallish limbs. On a larger log, as you cut, you have less and less room for the saw to move. But most won't be cutting something so large that this is a problem.

    I like the Dustrude saw. They come in three sizes, 21', 24', and 30'. I have the smaller one. The Dustrude sturdiest of any of the saws that I've seen and that means that they cut faster and with less effort than other saws. They have them on amazon, but the price looks to be much higher than elsewhere.

    https://fourdog.com/bobs-quick-buck-saw-24/
    #43
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  4. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Saw this thing a few days ago... looked like a competent tool. 90 bucks though. I was expecting something like 25-30 bucks. What's in this that makes it so expensive? Can get a gas chainsaw for a little more.
    [​IMG]

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    #44
  5. NoelJ

    NoelJ Been here awhile

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    Just stumbled across this thread and realized I own a shockingly large number of the saws discussed. All of them will do the job, which is a good sign. Green wood vs. dry wood is a decision point. Pruning saws work best for green, although the Laplander is great for dry wood. Something to keep in mind for the firewood vs. trail clearing criteria. Bow saws are fantastic, and better as they get bigger. I don't like the triangular ones either, as they limit the saw stroke on larger wood. I pack light and small, and although the Silky saws are the best of the best in their class, my choice is a Fiskars sliding saw. At 3-4 oz., nothing can match it's power to weight ratio. I've hammered on them for years and the only failure has been the tip breaking off one at the first tooth - lost about 1/4" of blade. Still works fine. [If you lack coordination it might not go as well with an untensioned blade.]
    [​IMG]
    #45
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  6. squish

    squish Out of the office.

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    The first thing I did with my Sven saw, was to file the edges and round them all, makes it much easier to live with.
    Mine's 25 years old and still going strong.
    #46
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  7. mbabc

    mbabc Curmudgeon trainee

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    I've the non folding Felco 620. It's been a great saw that fits in my pannier easily. Think it's been replaced by the 621 now I believe.
    #47
  8. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    Compare that price vs Silky, I bet in a similar size, they are the same price. It might actually just be a rebranded Silky. Quality tools cost a lot. That is a tool that would last someone a lifetime, just doing moto camping fire wood and trail clearing. A gas powered chainsaw that costs a bit more is not going to pack well on the bike and is a bit louder to use.
    #48
  9. Bhart89

    Bhart89 Long timer Supporter

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    I’ve seen pics of the non-folding saws mounted along side the forks. Looked like a pretty slick and out of the way setup.
    #49
  10. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Yeah, I'm not taking a chainsaw with me, just referencing the engineering involved. I was just thinking that this is a 25 buck tool. Not closer to 100.

    #50
  11. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    I have kitchen knives that are over $100 each. I can appreciate how a cutting device can reach high prices.


    How about $950?
    https://www.treestuff.com/katanaboy-professional-1000mm-folding-saw/
    #51
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  12. Beemer Dood

    Beemer Dood Been here awhile

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    These guys have a sense of humor. The ad states

    #52
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  13. silsen

    silsen Long timer

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    The big rigid Silkys are the ones used by the overwhelming majority of professional arborists.
    #53
  14. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Motorsickle enthusiast

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    Dang these threads! I find myself now studying how I can justify a thousand dollar hand saw.
    #54
  15. rider1150gsadv

    rider1150gsadv Long timer

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    While I appreciate well made blades and have a few of them, a thousand dollar handsaw won't be one of them... IMHO that is a bit(?) over the top for what essentially is a garden tool....:augie
    #55
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  16. NoelJ

    NoelJ Been here awhile

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    You can get that saw for $575 if you forego the humor and search for low price. Or a LOT less if you step down to a 500 or 650mm. Just trying to help, DirtyOldMan!
    #56
  17. Emway

    Emway Adventurer

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    I have to back up @1994klr250 on this one. The Agawa Canyon Boreal 21 is the bees knees.

    Lots of the saws I'm seeing here are only good for 1-2" branches with their short blades, and ergonomically exhausting after cutting for a few minutes. The other folding bow saws don't have enough clearance room between the top of the blade and the bottom of the top rail/support to cut anything more than 3 inches max. The Boreal 21, as mentioned above, can cut through 6" logs with nominal effort.

    Find one medium standing dead tree, lop it down, cut 18" sections for 10 minutes, and you have enough firewood not only for the night, but wood leftover for a breakfast fire. So much better than cutting huge piles of sticks for an evening's fire. It uses a standard 21" blade which can be replaced at any hardware store on the planet.

    Disclaimer... Although I've had the pleasure of meeting the owner of Agawa Canyon, I have no affiliation with the company. I found out we're neighbors when I went online to purchase. That's the only bias here, but I'd already done my research and met him as a result of my purchase (He was kind enough to bring one home with him so I could pick it up and save shipping costs).

    The saw now lives in the box on my 4 wheeler for clearing trails, comes with me on all my remote fishing trips, and for the last few years has joined me on every bike trip I've taken. I used to take a hatchet with me on bike trips - no more. This unit weighs a quarter of what a hatchet does, and obviously you can't hack up "logs" with a hatchet.

    I've used lots of various implements to cut wood on camping trips over the years - I've finally found the one I'm sticking with.
    #57
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  18. Sattphalat

    Sattphalat Adventurer

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    I love this saw. I have had mine in my camping gear for years.
    To guys together can fell, slice and split a large dry spruce in an our. Together with a medium sice axe. Not one of those silly small camping axes.
    #58
  19. NoelJ

    NoelJ Been here awhile

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    The Agawa saws are a modernized version of one I have - the "Bob Dustrude" saw. It's awesome, but with one thing that bugs me. In a pack or box, it rattles like crazy. Does the Agawa pack silently?
    #59
  20. Emway

    Emway Adventurer

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    You can buy a fancy pants leather sheath to stow it in. Those are nice, but I'm a frugal SOB. I didn't buy the sheath, I just use a small velcro strap and wrap it around the handle to ensure it stays closed. Not sure if that's even necessary, but that's what I do. I've never put it in the panniers on the bike. I zip tie it to the arms of the pannier mounts. I just snip the ties when I need to use it, then zip tie it back on when I'm done. On the quad, it goes in the passenger seat/storage box and I've never heard it rattle back there. So yeah, to answer your question, I've never heard mine rattle at all. If it does, I've never noticed it.
    It may rattle a bit in a pannier, a metal saw bouncing around in a metal box... With the sheath it wouldn't though.
    #60
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