Can I take out this wall?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Bloodweiser, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    Wanted to take out this interior wall, but that 45 brace in the corner is telling me to think again.

    What say you?

    IMG_3803.JPG IMG_3804.JPG IMG_3805.JPG
    #1
  2. Bikedude987

    Bikedude987 Been here awhile

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    Sure looks structural to me....
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  3. LookMaNoHands

    LookMaNoHands Reformed pirate...

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    Runs perpendicular to the joists above which means a load bearing wall. If you take the wall you’ll need a beam and posts to support the load above.

    A structural engineer can figure out sizing and spacing of the beam and posts.
    #3
  4. Vince

    Vince Been here awhile

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    What century was that built in,love the doweled connextion.Do the joists continue through over the top of the wall,they are pretty small and obviously get some support from it,that wall.Around my area wood larth,sp, that system of render,wall cladding was last done at least 100 years ago and using much narrower strips of timber and lime render.
    #4
  5. ozmoses

    ozmoses .

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    If I am seeing your pic correctly,the wall with the window bears the weight of the rafters; I do not see any load upon the beam in question.

    Second floor, or single story??

    The corner braces are against sheer. (note that you have siding, no sheathing)

    It is odd that there is not a corresponding lower brace as there are generally 4 per post- 2 up and 2 down.

    What distance do you plan to span?

    That hemlock beam is what, around 9"x9" It can clear span quite a bit-especially with no load.

    The brace can be removed or re positioned but you will want to make some accommodation for the sheer load, though not everyone does.

    OTOH, P&B homes can withstand an amazing amount of structural abuse .

    The bulk of my work has been on post and beam houses the age of yours and older and in your area- just be lucky nobody has hacked it up already.
    #5
  6. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    I believe the house to have been built in 1801. At least this section anyway.

    Those joists aren't joists, merely nailing strips for the lathe.
    They're all loose as hell and some only have an inch of purchase on the cross beams.
    I'm ditching them and raising the ceiling. :wings


    Here is the other side of that same wall, first floor.

    IMG_1101 (1).jpg
    #6
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  7. ericrat

    ericrat Long timer

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    We need a wider angle picture. You certainly shouldn't take out the braces. But that said, depending on the span, the studs MAY not be all that important structurally.

    Timber frame is a whole different world. Depending on what part of the world you are in, I may be able to put you in contact with a competent timber framer.
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  8. ozmoses

    ozmoses .

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    Many of the P&B houses were framed with openings for doors and windows cut in later by simply hacking out a stud, moving it over and using it as a floating nailer.

    Though the studs on the eave walls do bear some load, most of it is taken by the posts and beams themselves- especially if the roof structure includes purlins.

    In the non-load bearing walls, the studs are little more than nailers.
    According to modern span tables, all of these homes should have fallen down by now.

    When asking questions like this, many answers harken back to what somebody once learned watching Tommy Silva repair a money pit on an episode of TOH.

    I grew up in a P&B and have invariably( and sometimes much to my dismay) worked on them for 30 +/- years.

    I've seen several hanging in the air for years with little discernible change or real damage done.
    I've also seen some literally hacked in half to make room for CI plumbing runs.
    They are quite resilient & forgiving structures even when treated poorly; that said,common sense and good building technique go a long way.

    Forget level, forget plumb, forget square- split the difference and go for flat with these grand dames.

    However, many times with bathrooms or kitchens- when plumb,square,and level count, it can be advantageous (and easier) to re-frame within the existing structure. :deal
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  9. filmfan

    filmfan Long timer

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    The beam looks pretty substantial to me, but I'm not an engineer.
    Kudos for showing off that hand-hewn gem.
    #9
  10. Cogswell

    Cogswell Road Captain, Hell I'm a Road General.

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    You are going to want to provide some support for that beam when you remove everything below, it is a structural member.
    #10
  11. Boomer343

    Boomer343 Been here awhile

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    I worked with a fellow on a post and beam, not that old but not far off on roughness. He had fabricated a corner bracket out of metal to stabilize a corner like that after we took out the corner brace and the wall studs. I think it was easier to drill the steel than that old timber.
    #11
  12. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    That's the widest angle I can get, my back is against a wall.

    The span of that wall is 16'.

    I've been in this home 5 years now, and have done of few rooms already.
    I think I'm starting to get the hang of it...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. Treedguy

    Treedguy Long timer

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    :brow
    That's nice!
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  14. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails

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    Is there a way to incorporate the beam and angle into the finished design? Just remove the wall studs? Leave that cool old lumber exposed?
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  15. LookMaNoHands

    LookMaNoHands Reformed pirate...

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    Makes way more sense looking at it this morning, turns out the resolution on my laptop is a wee bit better than looking at it on the phone...:baldy
    #15
  16. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    I've been talking to my neighbor about this and your's is the solution he came to when opening up his kitchen.
    It looked good!

    ...but not the type of thing you'd want in the shower.
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  17. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer

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    hand hewn post & beam.... nice.
    #17