Can we trust the Tiger computer?

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by Bamaboy, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy High Plains Rider

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    I just bought the bike and about three hundred miles on the way home at a gas station the oil light comes on and it will not start. Okay, so the oil is low, I put oil in it but it does not register the new oil level. I shake it, try to push it off, look at it, turn the key off and on several times, yell at it and nothing. The computer refuses to recognize the oil. I call Triumph but they are closed on Mondays. I am stranded. Finally I push the kill switch off and on. That did it!!! It fires right up and I continue my trip after being stranded for only 35 minutes.

    Even though it was a good thing that it would not start with low oil, what happened to just a light coming on? It shut down on me and would not let me go even after putting oil in.

    Will this thing leave me stranded one day 30 miles out in the desert because it thinks it knows what is best for me?

    How reliable are these computers on these bikes? Is there a manual somewhere besides the owners manual? Did you know that you had to turn the kill switch off and one when the oil was low and refilled? Can you bypass the computer to get the bike running?

    Juts thinking out loud as I am new to the computer ran adventure bike. My last adventure bike was a 1994 Yamaha XT600 with carbs. Lol
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  2. Emmett

    Emmett Been here awhile Supporter

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  3. MapleRoad

    MapleRoad Been here awhile Supporter

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    It seems the ECU is sensitive to kill switch usage. I guess I should start using mine.
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  4. Actionable Mango

    Actionable Mango Been here awhile

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    Isn't it normal for the oil light to be on prior to starting? Dash lights often show error states prior to startup and do not settle in until a few seconds after starting. IIRC the oil light will always be on prior to starting because there's no pressure in the oil until after the bike starts. So I suspect that you have it backwards (the oil light is on because the engine hasn't started...not the engine cannot start because the oil light is on). Admittedly I might be thinking of my BMW and could be wrong about the Tiger.

    If that's the case (it's normal to have oil light on prior to startup), then to me this doesn't sound like a computer issue. For decades ignition kill switches (emergency, clutch, side stand, and accident) have caused infinite numbers of problems starting motorcycles and infinite incorrect diagnosis. Much more likely a faulty switch, user error (forgot to pull in clutch), or a switch was slightly out of alignment and got fixed by toggling.
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  5. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy High Plains Rider

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  6. Actionable Mango

    Actionable Mango Been here awhile

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    As far as I know the oil warning light is based on oil pump pressure. The computer doesn't know the oil pressure until the bike has started and the oil pump has pressurized the system. In other words, it's not really a "low oil" warning light, it's a "low oil pressure" warning light. So I don't think the bike has a way to measure oil prior to starting.

    With your theory, the bike is somehow measuring the oil level prior to starting, and checks the oil level again after you cycle the kill switch? What is the mechanism for doing this? Is there some kind of float gauge in the motor? This would really surprise me. But admittedly I am new to Triumph and don't know much about the motor yet.
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  7. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy High Plains Rider

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    I have no idea. I just told what happened. The why is a mystery to me as well, I have had the bike only two weeks. You are correct about the pressure so I guess the kill switch starts things over. I just know that it worked.
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  8. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy High Plains Rider

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    Since it is pressure instead of measuring the oil level. How did it know the pressure was okay after the kill switch was utilized? I don't really give a flip how it did it, I am just glad that it started and the OP was to complain about computer control of our bikes.
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  9. MapleRoad

    MapleRoad Been here awhile Supporter

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    Wait, aren't you the OP, @Bamaboy?

    @Actionable Mango is questioning the original hypothesis, and I agree. The bike didn't know the oil level, and never does. It doesn't care about oil level, it cares about oil pressure. I'm not sure that the ECM will shut down the bike when the oil pressure light goes on, but the manual states very strongly to not ride with that light on. I doubt they would kill the engine for that, because it creates an unsafe condition for the rider, and liability for Triumph. If a rider gets injured because the bike killed ignition at freeway speeds (or a lawyer can allege this), Triumph wastes money on another lawsuit.

    How low was the oil before you added any? How much did you add? What was the level after you finished adding oil?

    The bike always has an oil pressure light on before the engine starts because there is no oil pressure. Oil is pressurized by the oil pump, which is driven by the motor. No RPMs, no oil pressure. If we know the bike cannot measure the oil level, and we also know that kill switchesn have been the cause of gremlins for decades, you should be looking at that little bundle of engineering.

    That flipping the kill switch around fixed the problem puts the focus on the kill switch. Is it possible you bumped it?

    A few weeks ago, I was riding along, and fiddling with something. Then the bike starts slowing. Throttle is unresponsive. I was in the middle of nowhere, but with friends, so it was bad but not BAD. The bike wouldn't restart. I was starting to get all worked up. After a minute that seemed like hours, I noticed that I had bumped the kill switch. Flip, start, signal, ride on. I was filled with relief.
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  10. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy High Plains Rider

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    I can't remember all the details. It wouldn't be the first time that I did something stupid though. I locked myself out of the house the other day.
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  11. MapleRoad

    MapleRoad Been here awhile Supporter

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    Oh man, if that's stupid, I'm an idiot. :rofl
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  12. Actionable Mango

    Actionable Mango Been here awhile

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    It doesn't. I don't think oil has anything to do with start prevention because the bike doesn't know anything about the oil unless its already running.
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  13. Emmett

    Emmett Been here awhile Supporter

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    Just thinking that everyone who’s written that their Tiger mysteriously died [myself included] then just as mysteriously started after fiddling around with fuses, the kill switch, the clutch cable switch, the side stand switch, and whatever else they did, that the problem must be in the ECU and that it may not ever happen again, or it may and perhaps the best thing to do is nothing. I’m thinking that there’s something in the computer that just needs to clear itself out after 10 minutes or so.

    Mine hasn’t done it again and I’ve taken it out on several short and long rides. So I’ll just keep riding it and reading this thread and perhaps someone will have additional insight.
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  14. MapleRoad

    MapleRoad Been here awhile Supporter

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    There are probably a dozen switches that could have a momentary lapse of reason ( debris, corrosion, misalignment, coronal mass ejection interference ) which prevent the engine from firing. If the ECU blocks it, there should be a code logged and those can be read by the dealer.
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  15. NumberCruncher

    NumberCruncher Long timer

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    I was driving down the road the other day and couldn't find my car keys . . .

    If the original problem has some how gone away I wouldn't stress about it until it comes back. A one time fluke can likely be just that. I have owned bikes that were really sensitive to using the key to shut the bike off vs the kill switch. Your solution leads me to believe the bike may prefer to be shut down one way or the other and not utilizing that preferred method may be causing the hangup.

    NC

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  16. GasDepot

    GasDepot Sold the Cage

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    Found this on web for what it’s worth
    XRX codes

    It appears that Triumph have carried more wizardry over from the Explorer to the new 800s, this time to display DTC (error) codes on the instruments.


    So for owners of the new (XCx / XRx) models, you can do the following to check if there are any DTC (error) codes.....


    Press and hold the 'up'& 'info'buttons (^& i) on the left switch cluster while turning the ignition on.


    Any DTCs stored should be displayed on the clocks for a few seconds. If there are no errors it should display P0000.


    1. Put bike in Neutral
    2. Sit on bike, kickstand up.
    3. Make sure the CC off/on button is off (Extended out, not depressed in, again, this was on the 15)
    4. Turn on Key
    5. Turn on Ignition (Red lever down)
    6. Green light for CC should be blinking (Mine was anyway)
    Start the reset sequence:


    1. Activate the Front Brake Switch by pulling and releasing the font brake
    2. Activate the Rear Brake Switch by pressing and releasing the rear brake pedal
    3. Activate the Clutch Switch by pulling and releasing the Clutch
    4. Activate the Twist Grip Cruise Control cancel switch by operating and holding the throttle grip in the fully closed position
    5. Press the Cruise Control On/Off switch to ON (on the ’15)
    6. Press the Cruise Control +/Accelerate Switch
    7. Press the Cruise Control -/ Decelerate Switch
    8. CC light should stop blinking
    #16