Canadian Tire motorcycle oil

Discussion in 'Canada' started by TonyT, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. flossandfly

    flossandfly Been here awhile

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    Meant to buy 5w-40. The 0w-40 does not say JASO certified on the jug. Does the 5w-40 and 15w-40 have different certification?

    Do I have to try to return this to canadian tire?
    #41
  2. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Pretty sure any oil with a viscosity rating of 0w, is not motorcycle capable, in fact it's probably classified as an 'energy saving oil' which means friction modifiers, which are not known to be good for wet clutches.

    Get rid of the shite.
    #42
  3. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    The 0W/40 is for sub zero winter conditions in the big trucks, a much different formula than the 5W/40 Rotella... I would take it back and swap it unless your planning a mid winter ride to Inuvik... The 5W/40 synthetic will hold it's viscosity longer so your motorcycles oil change intervals can be extended over what is recommended for the non synth 15/40...
    #43
  4. flossandfly

    flossandfly Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the info. That stuff is going back, no plans to ride to Inuvik.
    #44
  5. TimeTo Ride

    TimeTo Ride ALLAN

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    I've used the motomaster oil in several bikes and quads with no problems. I use Castrol GTX synthetic in my boxers because of the dry clutch. I'm suprised to see all of the people using synthetic oil and assuming there is lots of it going into bikes with wet clutches. Twice I've had quad clutches get slick, once with Mobil 1, a car oil but also to two machines using Motul full synthetic. My mechanic says to use plain old motorcycle oil in everything and change it often.
    #45
  6. skysailor

    skysailor Rat Rider Supporter

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    I still can't believe we have an thread dedicated to Canadian Tire motor oil?
    Lyle
    #46
  7. 250senuf

    250senuf Long timer

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    How Canadian is that, EH? :D
    #47
  8. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Oils these days do not fall into the 2 categories of synthetic and non synthetics. They fall into the two categories of motorcycle specific, and non motorcycle specific. There are synthetic JASO MA and API spec SG oils, and non synthetic JASO MA and API spec SG oils. All others, whether synthetic or non synthetic should be avoided at all cost on machines with shared engine/gearbox/clutch lubrication.
    It's really that simple.
    #48
  9. FlyingDutchman

    FlyingDutchman Dirt Biker

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    Are you sure? Someone argued that as long as you avoid oils with friction modifiers, your clutch will be fine.
    #49
  10. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Well, 5 yrs ago, someone who was bound and determined to use non specific motorcycle oil could default to API spec CC and CD turbo deisel spec engine oil, albiet with reduced mileage between oil changes. Recent changes to make this blend of oil friendly to catalytic converters have reduced ZDDP additives to levels below what many consider ok for high reving air cooled engines.
    Of course, oil with friction modifiers should be avoided. But I argue that using any car oil in engines with shared gearbox lubrication, the sheering effect of gears running together does quick work on the reduced sheer viscosity capability of car oil.
    10 yrs ago, I rebuilt a CBX engine. I used deisel spec CD to break in, as it had high ZDDP levels, however, I changed the oil 3 times at 500 miles before reverting to more expensive API spec SG non-synthetic.
    That said, I think using full synthetic bike oil and extending oil changes to 10,000-15,000 kms is a mistake as well. While that oil is no where near close to sheer viscosity breaking down, it is however just as contaminated with the acidic byproducts of combustion.
    #50
  11. FlyingDutchman

    FlyingDutchman Dirt Biker

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    Oh, I thought the dinosaurs were before the ZDDP additive legislation:D
    #51
  12. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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  13. intotheabis

    intotheabis High on life!

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    Ok, Canadian Tire has the Rottella on sale this week.
    Which one is the one we should use on our bikes?
    There are 3 available, 2 synthetics and 1 standard.
    Kinda confused by all the spec's

    Any help appreciated!
    #53
  14. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brow...la+T+Synthetic+Diesel+Motor+Oil.jsp?locale=en

    Notice tho it's 5W40, not 15W40. The stuff I have still says Rotella T6 (same blue container) - obviously they just changed labelling somewhat. I blend with Castrol 15W40 motorcycle oil (in my KLR), and Castrol automotive oil (10W40) in my Goldwing. The stuff goes on sale at Cdn Tire often.

    An interesting automotive vs motorcycle oil article: http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html

    Tremendous amount of oil technical info here: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/motor-oil-101/

    These articles changed the way I view oils. I didn't really think synthetic was worth the money before - I do now.
    #54
  15. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    While there is a giant hornet's nest of debate of whether you should mix different viscosity oils together, there are certain basic things that remain constant when looking at viscosity ratings.
    For instance, the viscosity rating 5W-40 tells you certain basic things about the oil. The number [5] indicates the viscosity capability of the oil at 32 degrees F. The letter [W] indicates 'winter'. The number [40] indicates the viscosivty capabilities at 212 degrees F.

    While I cannot read the API specs of these Shell Rotella oils, I'm going to assume that, as a non motorcycle oil, they do not have the capability of long term service within the sheering effects of a motorcycle gearbox. And, while diesel oils of 10 yrs ago had quite high ZDDP additives for valve wear protection, recent environmental mandates by the U.S. government have reduced ZDDP levels to absolute minimum levels. I would absolutely NOT use this oil in an engine with shared gearbox/engine/clutch lubrication system, I would use the oil in an engine like a Moto Guzzi or BMW. Now, with that said, if you like in,,,,Whitehorse, a thinner oil might be a great option for you. If you spend most of your riding time in warm to hot areas, a 5W40 is a definite no go, and even a 15W40 is a bit thin unless your manual specifies it. Air cooled engines with higher temps, and bigger tolerances bewteen moving parts, 15w-50 is the minimum I'd go. Unfortunately, they don't make a 15W-50 automotive oil, so defaulting to a bike oil is the only option.
    #55
  16. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    Steve, did you read this link he posted ? http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html
    It explains the oil very well...

    Wet clutch? I've been using the 5W/40 T6 in my 640 for over 120,000 KM with no effect on the clutch action... In fact when I dissassembled the clutch at the 127,000 km mark all the plates measured well within spec...
    #56
  17. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Yes, I read both articles. He used alot of fact with some personal thoughts thrown in, which I'm ok with. I highly question his casual dismissal of the JASO MA specifications, even though all motorcycle manufacturers call for that oil.
    Basically, I would say that you can use any oil you want based on your spending habits/capabilities. Telling other people to use oils not recommended by manufactures may be a tadd iresponsible however, mainly based on saving money. I'm not aware of any motorcycle manufacturer that recommend defaulting to using diesel spec oil. I won't tell people to use products not designed for their engine if the maker of the engine does not call for it.
    #57
  18. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    I've come to believe that opinions regarding what oils do and don't do for you, i.e. what's the "best" oil for you, is so highly subjective... and I believe we all (as in me too) can't help but be swayed somewhat by marketing. By that I mean we'd all like to think that product A, that we're paying more for (in the belief it is better), MUST be better than the others!

    Packaging and marketing, and then market share (everyone is using it - it must be good!) are powerful influences. That's why IMO these independent lab reports are very important - they cut thru that BS.

    I suspect we worry too much about oil quality... it's probably much more important to ensure that you're oil is topped up and clean as possible; i.e don't run with old tired oil. I'm not so convinced that there is a huge difference in quality from manufacturer to manufacturer anymore - might have certainly been the case at one time. Those lab reports sure do seem to show that synthetic breaks down slower than dino/mineral blend, and has higher shear resistance (longer chain molecules!). Damn expensive stuff tho (synthetic) - sure pays to buy when Shell Rotella T and Mobil 1 go on sale at Cdn Tire.
    #58
  19. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    I get what your saying, but the use of Rotella T in motorcycles is a very common practice and well documented... Besides my personal experience and that of the people I ride with who swear by it, I have read of no I'll effects to the clutch in any motorcycle, unless the clutch was already shot... What I did notice right off the bat when I swapped over to the stuff in place of a common name brand Moto Synthetic was smoother shifting and a smoother engine... On the LC 4 engine it is pretty easy to pick up on any change to the engine characteristics... For me the oil has worked well and saved me a lot of money over buying the equivalent amount of Moto synthetic... I have used up about 4.5- 20 liter pails, each pail saves me $200-$240 over if I was to buy the same amount of MC synthetic I used prior in the 1 liter containers...


    Lets go into fork oil, back in the day there was no such thing, on my early motorcycles they asked for ATF... Now you have motorcycle specific fork oil in different weights at high dollar prices... I hear people say you can't use ATF in your forks, it'll wreck them... I still do, and I really notice no different in fork action unless you are using it in place of a very light oil... I often blend ATF with a lighter grade fork oil to reduce the viscosity if the fork feels harsh... I just replaced the original bushings in my forks after 150,000 KM and while they were not in terrible shape, some of the coatings were worn off so it was time...

    What it all comes down to is personal choice, if you feel Rotella it is too risky don't use it, nobody's forcing you... I really would not want to be a guinea pig for some untested product, I only started using the stuff after reading a lot of positive reports from guys who were already using it in their motorcycles...
    #59
  20. intotheabis

    intotheabis High on life!

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    I'm convinced that Rotella T6 is the way to go.
    Just bought 2 - 5 liter jugs from CT.
    I will try it in my KLR, Goldwing and Tiger.
    I will send out some feedback once the weather warms up and I can actually ride :eek1
    #60