CannonTour - The Armies of Summer (Wildland Firefighting) Pt 1/3

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Cannonshot, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 15 Continued

    Heading toward Mount Hood

    [​IMG]

    Part of the Columbia River Highway Scenic Drive.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This town is built on a gravel bar from some glaciers.
    [​IMG]

    Wind surfing on the Columbia.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    From Panorama Point County Park.
    [​IMG]

    Fruit company.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Apple Valley Country Store is quite an attraction.
    [​IMG]

    Remember when we visited the Cub Crafters factory? This is where they do their flight training after they build you an airplane. Hood River airport.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Streamlined model.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I think that is Mount Adams in the background.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Museum on the airport. List in the link tells you the planes there.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    MYUMPH, chudzikb, Shaggie and 6 others like this.
  2. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 15 Continued

    On to Mount Hood

    Along the Mount Hood Scenic Byway.
    [​IMG]

    Nice place to camp.
    [​IMG]

    The northern end of the Mount Hood Railroad is here in Parkdale.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This 6-7,000 year old lava flow comes off the mountain and blocks the road.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Someone I went to Wilderness First Responder training with is a climbing guide out here. She seems pretty happy with the work that takes her to climbs on two continents.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I admire her for what she does.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When the snowmelt runs it must big.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A nice ride up to the Timberline Lodge.

    [​IMG]

    Mount Hood runs over 11,000 feet in elevation. It has 12 named glaciers/snowfields. Mount Hood is the most likely of Oregon's mountains to erupt. It has six ski areas. Speaking of eruptions, an ammunition ship named after Mount Hood blew up during WWII killing 45, injuring 371, and leaving 327 missing.

    [​IMG]

    About 10,000 people try to climb Mount Hood each year. A lot of people have died trying to climb here. Most deaths are from falls and hypothermia.

    [​IMG]

    A Chinook helicopter doing a rescue on Hood.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Timberline Lodge was built on the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration. Some nice pix in this link of the artisan work that was done there. They also filmed some movies around the lodge.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ZigZag ranger station (behind the sign . . . oops).
    [​IMG]
    MYUMPH, chudzikb, staticPort and 4 others like this.
  3. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 15 On to Detroit and end of day.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Jonsrud Viewpoint
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Back on the Historic Columbia River Highway
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Coming up on Vista House.
    [​IMG]

    Vista House was installed at Crown Point as a memorial to Oregon pioneers and as a comfort station for travelers on this historic highway.
    [​IMG]

    This art nouveau structure is 733' above the river. With a marble interior and brass fixtures some people called it a $100,000 outhouse at the time it was built back in 1918.
    [​IMG]

    Nice touch with the old style guardrails on this historic highway.
    [​IMG]

    A really nice ride along here.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I skipped Rooster Rock State Park. The park has a phallic monolith (originally named "Cock Rock") which is now named Rooster Rock so as to be less offensive to the public. The park also has the first officially designated clothing optional beach in the US.

    Troutdale is named for a trout pond that was here back in the 1800s. During WWII Reynolds had a big aluminum plant here to support the war effort.
    [​IMG]

    Some people stole a train here in 1894.

    "Some of the most militant Coxeyites were those who formed their own "armies" in Pacific Northwest centers such as Butte, Tacoma, Spokane, and Portland. Many of these protesters were unemployed railroad workers who blamed railroad companies, President Cleveland's monetary policies, and excessive freight rates for their plight. The climax of this movement was perhaps on April 21, 1894, when William Hogan and approximately 500 followers commandeered a Northern Pacific Railway train for their trek to Washington, D.C. They enjoyed support along the way, which enabled them to fight off the federal marshals attempting to stop them. Federal troops finally apprehended the Hoganites near Forsyth, Montana. While the protesters never made it to the capital, the military intervention they provoked proved to be a rehearsal for the federal force that broke the Pullman Strike later that year."

    [​IMG]

    In 1882 the railroad came through. A guy asked the railroad to build a depot here and they refused. The guy then sailed his boat up a river that the railroad planned to cross with a trestle. He then declared the river navigable and insisted that the railroad build an expensive drawbridge instead of the trestle. In the end the railroad put in a depot and the guy withdrew his drawbridge demand. The 1882 depot burned in 1907 so this is a replacement built back then.
    [​IMG]

    I tried checking out some dams along the way but didn't get close enough.
    [​IMG]

    West Cascades Scenic Byway
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I ended the day at Detroit. Restaurant and services were closed. No food. Vending machines were empty - no drinks. A helpful owner at a small motel there recognized this recurring problem and gave me a couple of microwave entrees. Very nice.
    MYUMPH, Shaggie, Ducatijim and 4 others like this.
  4. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,411
    Location:
    Dixie
    Beautiful country.
    Cannonshot likes this.
  5. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 137 miles

    [​IMG]

    Heading to Smith Rock

    [​IMG]

    Detroit Lakes looks like quite the boating hotspot. The Detroit Dam created a 400' deep lake that is about 9 miles long. Floods, power, and irrigation.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Somewhere along here I picked up the McKenzie Pass - Santiam Pass Scenic Byway.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Mt. Washington is an old eroded volcano. It runs a little over 7,600'. Lots of lava in the neighborhood.
    [​IMG]

    Sisters (named after the nearby Three Sisters) isn't too big of a town. It produced Rainn Wilson of The Office and maybe D.B.Cooper.
    [​IMG]

    Heading over to Smith Rock SP.
    [​IMG]

    Smith Rock is considered to be the birthplace of modern American sport climbing. It has some cutting edge climbing routes.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  6. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Over to Prineville

    [​IMG]

    Les Schwab Tire Centers a big out here employing over 7,000 people in 9 western states with over 400 stores. Les started out in Prineville with a single shop. Now Prineville is the site of his distribution center. They also do some recapping and other stuff there. Big campus. Too big to photograph.
    [​IMG]

    Then Facebook put a data center in at Prineville. People complained because the electricity they used was from a company that ran 70% coal for generation.
    [​IMG]

    Then Apple showed up in Prineville and put in a "green" data center.
    [​IMG]

    Prineville was also home to the Prineville Hotshots that were killed in the South Canyon Fire in Colorado.
    [​IMG]

    Not all killed that day were from Prineville, but Prineville has a memorial for all.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Smokejumper Sarah Doehring recalls growing unease as winds picked up.

    Prineville Hotshot Alex Robertson carries on legacy of comrades killed in 1994 wildfire.

    Fire chaser Michelle Ryerson is now BLM's top wildfire safety officer.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    MYUMPH, bomose, Ducatijim and 4 others like this.
  7. siyeh

    siyeh unproductive Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Evansville, WI
    The security guard in your artsy rest area pic looks like Newman on Seinfeld

    just an outstanding report sir
    Cannonshot likes this.
  8. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Heading over to a big USFS installation in Redmond.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Not too easy to get access here, but once I did I had some really exceptional folks showing me around. Great reps for their organizations and their work.

    [​IMG]

    Planes like this are often used as lead planes to help guide aerial tankers on their drops. Others are used for aerial supervision of fires.
    [​IMG]

    Some British Aerospace 146 airliners have been converted to aerial tankers. They are replacing some of the old bombers and large prop aircraft that have been retired from this type of work.
    [​IMG]

    This is a station for mixing and pumping fire retardant for the aerial tankers.
    [​IMG]

    Lots of fancy connections.
    [​IMG]

    While we were chatting this smokejumper Sherpa came back after dropping people on a practice jump. We'll take a look inside later.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The tank on this plane holds about 3,000 gallons of retardant. It is pumped through hoses to the plane. I think it is something like a 15 minute turnaround.
    [​IMG]

    Hard to imagine a big fat airliner like this dropping retardant at low altitude with varying elevations and terrain. I asked about being close to the fire. A pilot told me that a flaming limb went past their cockpit window just the other day. Fires throw some pretty significant material into the air.
    [​IMG]

    This thing is important . . . but I forgot what it does. :lol3
    [​IMG]

    Retardant comes on tanker trucks in a concentrated form. It must be precisely mixed. One reason is it has to have the properties needed to fight the fire. Another is that the weight of the mix is important when loading the airplane. I have seen some stations where big bales of powder have to be mixed with water at the site. I was told shipping dry and having to mix is rare.
    [​IMG]

    I think this stuff weighs a little under 10 lbs/gal. They sample the mix and check it using a refractometer to make sure it is right.
    [​IMG]

    This stuff is essentially fertilizer. It is dyed red so people can see the previous drops to help them line up for follow on drops. In the standard version, the red stays around for a while. There is a version for sensitive areas where the dye fades away much more quickly. If they are going to drop very near sensitive waters they drop water instead of retardant. Wiki says "the phosphate and sulfate salts act as fire retardants and prevent combustion of cellulosic materials. They also act as a fertilizer once the fire danger has passed. Guar gum and clay are thickening agents to prevent dispersal of the retardant after it is dropped from the plane. Other ingredients include corrosion inhibitors and flow conditioners."
    [​IMG]

    This station has the ability to pump retardant off of a tanker once it has been loaded. It isn't good to leave the load on the tanker for an extended period. I suppose weight is an issue and another issue is that the mix might start to settle. If they pump it into this tank, they can mix it again and pump it back into the plane when it is needed. Not every retardant station has this ability. I was at one base where they loaded a tanker and then the mission got cancelled. If they didn't get another mission soon, they would have to fly the retardant to a designated drop area just to get it off the plane. I don't think these planes can land with a load of retardant so they have a designated area near the airport to drop it in the event of an incident that requires the plane to immediately return to the airport.
    [​IMG]
    MYUMPH, chudzikb and bomose like this.
  9. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Let's look at this tanker.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This general purpose cargo plane taxied by.
    [​IMG]

    What it looks like with all the airliner stuff taken out.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Calculations say these braces aren't really needed . . . but it seemed like a good idea anyway with 30,000 pounds in the tank.
    [​IMG]

    Mechanics like the stripped version since everything is exposed to work on.
    [​IMG]

    Kind of "scary" to see how some of the hardware is rigged.
    [​IMG]

    There are some pretty stout frame components in this thing.
    [​IMG]

    There are some sensors built into this thing that can report if a component is overstressed.
    [​IMG]
    Shaggie, MYUMPH, chudzikb and 2 others like this.
  10. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Cockpit
    [​IMG]

    Obviously a lot of systems and controls to understand very thoroughly.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I asked about G-forces. The standard plane could only handle a few Gs and 0 negative Gs. This conversion beefed that up a little. I think it could take one negative G and maybe a half a G more than standard in the other direction. I asked about lofting loads out to the side like we've all seen film of. Apparently that is bad for the plane since the load is much heavier under greater Gs and the plane isn't designed to take a release like that. They don't loft, at least with this plane, anymore.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This device controls the drops in tanker planes. It changes the shape of the drop and the density of the material. It lets you drop only partial loads as well. The characteristics of the drop need to vary based on the type of fire they are fighting. The pilot told me that engineers worked out the effective shapes and densities of the various drop settings by setting up a large grid with cups in each of the grid squares. After each drop, they would measure the quantity of retardant captured in each cup and establish effective patterns based on what they learned.
    [​IMG]

    There is more information about it toward the end of this video.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Being a fixed wing pilot I was asking a lot of questions about flying on a fire.
    [​IMG]

    He showed me a video on his phone of one of their drops.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Their track from some drops earlier in the week.
    [​IMG]

    This plane flies faster than the lead planes so they sometimes beat them to the target.
    [​IMG]

    Since these guys are essentially flying close air support, I asked how they kept track of things (including ground coordination) while on a mission - especially so close to the ground and varying terrain and with multiple aircraft working the fire. One thing he showed me was how he manages his notes on his kneeboard. They could be talking to an engine crewman on air to ground.
    [​IMG]

    A tasking order with mission information.
    [​IMG]

    Handy info on the yoke.
    [​IMG]

    This handle controls a speed brake that pushes out a couple of panels on the tail section to create drag (like for a dive bomber). He mentioned having the co-pilot pull the throttles back to idle and then tidying up things by working the speed brake as they set up on a drop.
    [​IMG]

    Even with the great avionics and gadgets, accuracy can still be a challenge. It can be pretty difficult with all the variables to put it exactly where you want the load to be. They have a mood indicator on the dash that has four different faces. Depending on how things are going, she can show different expressions.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Shaggie, MYUMPH, chudzikb and 5 others like this.
  11. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Wrapping up the tanker base portion before moving to other areas of the base.

    Operations center for the tanker base.
    [​IMG]

    There is one full time employee at the tanker base (my tour guide who runs it) and the rest are seasonal or contract workers.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Their primary area of responsibility.
    [​IMG]

    Various types of tankers from over the years.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A-26
    [​IMG]

    Operations tracks aircraft that are involved with fighting fire. It is amazing to see what is flying fire at any one moment.
    [​IMG]

    One thing that comes to mind is how much it all costs. But what is the cost of not fighting fire?
    [​IMG]

    Sometimes operations can see a tanker coming to their base even before they get official notification.
    [​IMG]

    They really stack them in there.
    [​IMG]

    Some oldies on the ramp from years ago.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    221 loads, 400,000 plus gallons
    [​IMG]

    691 loads, 1.7M gallons
    [​IMG]

    676 loads, 1.4M gallons
    [​IMG]

    They are set up for continuous operations.
    [​IMG]

    Pilots must be briefed and ready to fly at a moment's notice. Lounge for the long waits between missions.
    [​IMG]

    From an article that raises objections about aerial firefighting:

    "Thirty-seven firefighters have died in aerial firefighting accidents in the last decade. If similar casualty rates prevailed on the ground, the Forest Service found, more than 200 ground firefighters would die every year."
    Shaggie, MYUMPH, chudzikb and 5 others like this.
  12. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,411
    Location:
    Dixie
    Amazing how much coordination it takes to fight a fire. Glad we have these guys to put them out. I wonder how many square miles of timber would burn in previous centuries from natural fires before nature put them out. And how the native Americans dealt with the devastation.
    Cannonshot likes this.
  13. busdriver803

    busdriver803 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Camano Island, WA
    The information in your reports are amazing. I had no concept of what goes into fighting wildfires. Thank you!
    Ducatijim, bomose and Cannonshot like this.
  14. Hipster

    Hipster Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,427
    Location:
    Mpls, Mn.
    Bryan, enjoying your firefighting RR.

    This looks like a Coriolis mass flow meter, the U shaped tube twists with fluid flow and that movement is used to measure the flow of material.
    [​IMG]
    Shaggie and Cannonshot like this.
  15. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Let's check out the smokejumpers at the Redmond base. Part I

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Packing jump gear out.
    [​IMG]

    Tools get parachuted after the jumpers are on the ground. Running the chain saw is a good job. First come, first served so there is a race to get to the saw first. Of course, then you have to carry it out.
    [​IMG]

    Let down line is on the floor.
    [​IMG]


    Food for two for two days goes with the jumpers. Here are some common items.
    [​IMG]

    If someone gets hung up in a tree they sometimes have to climb to get the jumper or the chute. If so, they signal the plane and these climbers get dropped to the jumpers on the ground.
    [​IMG]

    This guy did a fantastic job taking me through the smokejumper stuff. A very professional representative for his crew and the forest service.
    [​IMG]

    I asked about cutting line all day and if it was hard on the back.
    [​IMG]

    Some jumpers just got back from a practice jump so they were inspecting their chutes.
    [​IMG]

    As I mentioned, they buy commercial chutes for personnel. Harnesses are made by the jumpers.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Jumpers need to pack their own chutes. It takes quite a bit of training and quality control.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Round chutes.
    [​IMG]

    The yellow line is connected to a cable in the plane. When you jump it pulls the chute out.
    [​IMG]

    Square chutes use a drogue chute to pull the main canopy out.
    [​IMG]

    They had a bunch of old style parachutes on display on the wall.
    [​IMG]

    They have all the right materials to make things. Even so, I wondered about "certifying" that the construction was done properly.
    [​IMG]

    They have a master rigger that oversees these things to make sure they are right.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    staticPort and rjnutt like this.
  16. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Smokejumpers Part II

    Instead of open lockers, this place used racks to store jump gear.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It is set up so that you kind of step into it.
    [​IMG]

    Jumpers have two minutes to get suited up. That includes the parachute. They practice this over and over to make the two minute mark.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The pants have a harness sewed into them to use with a let-down line if stuck in a tree.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All this needs to be carried out along with firefighting tools.
    [​IMG]

    I asked about an inspection. Seemed like a lot of risk trying to do it all in two minutes. He explained that a jumper that was not on the current stick would do an inspection. He called one over to demonstrate.
    [​IMG]

    Pretty systematic process. Like the military, these guys drill on some things over and over so it becomes automatic when the stress is on.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Add the working fire pack that jumpers wear while fighting fire.
    [​IMG]

    They keep a ready list that rotates jumpers from a longer list as calls come in.
    [​IMG]
  17. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Redmond Smokejumpers Part III

    Sherpa smokejumper plane. This one is more powerful than some Sherpas.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This one has a jumpable back door. I don't think they use it though.
    [​IMG]

    Jumpers on the right, tools on the left.
    [​IMG]

    Jump door.
    [​IMG]

    One sits in the door and the second jumper is nearby. They go two at a time.
    [​IMG]

    Knees in the breeze.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Can't use engines in wilderness areas to fight fires. In that case, they drop cross-cut saws instead of chain saws.
    [​IMG]

    One box has tools for two jumpers.
    [​IMG]

    It also has some food and water.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    staticPort, Shaggie and rjnutt like this.
  18. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 Continued

    Redmond Smokejumpers/Air Part IV

    [​IMG]

    Can be used as a lead plane for guiding aerial tankers in.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Keeps the wing on.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Back of the panel in the Sherpa.
    [​IMG]
    rjnutt, staticPort and Shaggie like this.
  19. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    33,311
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    Day 16 End of Day

    Redmond Smokejumpers Continued Part V

    [​IMG]

    Ready for quick reload.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Picture of a tool drop on a jumper's phone.
    [​IMG]

    Saws for wilderness areas.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Fitness is very important for these folks.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Like other stations, pictures of their crews each year.
    [​IMG]

    1964 crew.
    [​IMG]

    Jump board.
    [​IMG]

    Combat jump board (fire jumps).
    [​IMG]

    This hotshot crew may have been deployed to Alaska.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These crews deployed from here to Alaska. Big fire trouble up there.
    [​IMG]

    Training area for jumpers. They practice jumps related skills here. They have poles to practice let-downs, climbing with spikes, and the like.
    [​IMG]

    This tower is very familiar to me from my Army days.
    [​IMG]

    What a great day! Lots of great experiences today.
    Tricepilot, Ducatijim, rjnutt and 3 others like this.
  20. Shaggie

    Shaggie Unseen University Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,828
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Sensational access and reporting B!

    Why no chainsaws in wilderness areas? Risk of starting another fire?

    Cheers n thanks

    Shane
    Ducatijim likes this.