Carbon/Kevlar rear luggage boxes.....It has begun....

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by ebrabaek, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Thanks Griz...... When you make a project this size....It is important to set a few milestones...... or acknowledge when the present themselves.... Today I enjoyed the first of many more to come when I placed the Rotopax behind the box.... I just kind of sat there for a few minutes.....enjoying it.... Since this was the first blink of how it`s gonna look like.....:thumb:thumb

    Erling
  2. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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  3. Ducksbane

    Ducksbane Quaaack!!!

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    As Usual ... fabulous !:clap

    And you could take up root canal therapy (just might have to get used to slightly tighter working conditions!) :D
  4. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Kevlar molder filling......:evil .... Ha....:thumb:thumb

    Erling
  5. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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  6. EnderTheX

    EnderTheX Dirt Rider

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    Does it really matter that much though? While honeycomb does have good compressive strength compared to cardboard I would think the main point is to space out the layers of carbon so you get a lightweight rigid area. There are several fillers you can use such as Nomex or aluminum honeycomb, foam, or even cardboard I guess :ear
  7. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    In this app...... Not at all.....I sometimes use 3mm foam strips...... or balsa wood is great as well.... Like you said..... It`s about creating the void. Obviously a true honeycomb material would be stronger..... But one of my main goals are to introduce this to the novice......and the composite workings are hard enough to understand....let alone...and now we will gather some honeycomb material....:D:D This box will be plenty strong....And..... I`m essentially recycling the box the twin rotopax came in....yay...:freaky:freaky

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
    MatBirch likes this.
  8. EnderTheX

    EnderTheX Dirt Rider

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    Cool, I really like the idea of the balsa wood for a filler. I would think it is uniform enough, easy to shape, good compressible strength and easy to work with!! That really gives me some ideas!

    +1 for recycling too!
  9. bxr140

    bxr140 Flame Bait

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    Yeah, the biggest effect on strength and stiffness is spacing two composite "walls" apart from each other. Lots of complex maths, but pretty intuitive too.

    The problem you can run into when you're just doing wet lay ups with certain types of cores is over-saturating with resin (really a problem all the time, not just when you're using cores), which really just ends up adding weight and eventually lowering the yield points. And more importantly, for the DIY it means wasting money because you're wasting resin...

    Enter cardboard. It can work out quite well for the DIY because its cheap and doesn't absorb much resin. Really, there's no bigger endorsement than the fact that with ebrabaek's years of professional experience and long list of suppliers, he still goes for the brown stuff. Big picture, the end result of adding space is achieved all the same, so you don't really end up with a product that has significantly different characteristics.

    Regarding other honeycomb materials, At my "real" work all our panels are aluminum honeycomb cores, but they're pretty basic two dimensional panels. Some simple round shapes, but nothing too complex That stuff is expensive and certainly overkill for all but the most critical 'missions'...none of which involve motorcycles. :D

    At my...err...not-quite-a-real-company-yet, we use cardboard (and fiberglass) where we can for prototyping our...'things', but we typically go with a 2mm core mat for the production part. You can use that stuff with a wet lay up pretty easily and its not too expensive. More or less the same price as fiberglass (give or take) and a quarter the price of carbon fiber (again, give or take). The big benefit over cardboard is, of course, using it for complex shapes. Plus, if you're vacuum bagging (or even stepping up to infusion) you're going to have to ditch the cardboard.
  10. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Well said indeed......:thumb.... You touched an area that I had forgot to mention.......Indeed you can only use the Corrugated material when you have straight lines...... I have tried with some success soft bends.....but I usually stay away from Corrugated if it is NOT straight.....

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
  11. EnderTheX

    EnderTheX Dirt Rider

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    Reason being because it collapses on itself when it is bent at sharp angles and becomes useless. Sounds like a good tip to the noobies trying this out is to only use "fresh" pieces of cardboard and not something that's been stepped on or wet at one point.

    I still have my textbook from my composites class in grad school...
    Engineering Mechanics of Composite Materials, Second Edition, by Isaac M. Daniel and Ori Ishai

    I was flipping through it and now I remember why I was so impressed with composites, you can really do almost anything with them!
  12. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Yeppers.......

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
  13. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    One box is finished with all 4 sides honeycomb...... and the other has 2 sides done....... In regards to the conformity of the corrugated material...... With a little ingenuity....you can get soft bends done..... This piece has 2 angles....3 sides..... You sort of pre bend the corrugated material....then see what weights will hold it in place...... Note only two sides are weighted...... the side closest has not been weighted yet....and see the material not liking the stress.......
    [​IMG]

    Another note...... Sometimes....specially when using epoxy that need a post heat cure.....it can shift a little after plug/mold removal....... Not much you can do in this case..... The center with is 2mm smaller than the corners..... You can then reset the stress while the honeycomb cures.... It wont be perfect....but help a bit...... perhaps down to 1mm.......
    [​IMG]

    Both boxes should be done this afternoon....... ahhhhhh....have a appointment with ms.Andreja.......:*sip*

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
  14. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Amazing..... They are actual similar in size...... What are the odds.....:D:D
    [​IMG]

    Now onto find hinges, and latches......:thumb:thumb

    Erling
  15. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    That makes two of us.....:D... I`m having a bit of trouble finding the hasps.....I`t seems to be raining piano hinges....but no hasps to be had.....:cry

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
  16. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    The odds that they're even?

    :lol3

    Very impressive bit of work to this point. I'm waiting to see the durability testing.
  17. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Yeppers.....:rofl:rofl:clap

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
  18. njoytheride

    njoytheride NJOYN' THE JOURNEY Supporter

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    :clapgood ol American ingenuity, I love it when a plan comes together..
    A super way to go... :clap Njoytheride
  19. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

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  20. GZPainter

    GZPainter A Scouser from Crete

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    awesome work Erling...after the handguard and the skid plate these are AMAZING!!!

    after your work with CC I really want to learn to build thing from CC...