Carpenter Talk

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by disconnected, Jan 22, 2016.

  1. wee-twin

    wee-twin Been here awhile

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    MrBOB, Gordon is job security for you. I grew up with two labs. Great dogs!
  2. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    I asked the homeowner if living with Gordon was a handful, and he shuddered and said, you have no idea.
  3. wee-twin

    wee-twin Been here awhile

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    Labs calm down....when they are about 8 years old.....maybe.
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  4. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Ha ha ha ha... Mine never calmed down. His favorite trick was to break through the sheetrock between the basement and garage then nose up the garage door to escape.. only to run to the back of the house and sleep on the back deck. He would be soooooo proud of himself for that too
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  5. SafetyThird

    SafetyThird Pist-n-broke

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    One of my whippets was being boarded and climbed a ten foot chain link fence.

    And jumped over onto the concrete.

    Broke both front legs.

    He had to have some bones fused, but did survive.
  6. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    :clap
  7. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    [​IMG] M
    Many years since I’ve had to work on these accursed double hungs. I had to get 4 of them operable in a tightly restricted Historic building.
    This is one area where I have no respect for tradition - get rid of them, and give me a Marvin or an Andersen, or a Pella.
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  8. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    I have never restored them, only ripped them out and installed a whole new window. The old double hunts need the storm windows that look like that homeowner has. I am surprised they will not allow window replacement but are ok with storm windows.
  9. Otis the Sasquatch

    Otis the Sasquatch Long timer

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    Haven't wandered through in a while. I know this is a month old, but...


    Stopping at 120 might not be your problem.

    Most floors are only sanded to 120 max. A floor person would answer "not enough 'build' in the finish coat(s)".
    The product used was "thin" (most likely), or the application incorrect. :dunno

    Stain (or not), sealcoat (for build), two coats (good) finish.

    Example: Dura stain, Pallmann Color sealer, two coats Pallmann Power.

    Intercoat abrasion is only necessary when not "hot-coating" the finish coats.
    Stain, leave to full cure (overnight. longer with some. we sell Dura's & Bona's "quick dry").
    Apply water-based sealer. Let dry, 1-2 hours, not full cure. If left longer or to full cure then buff w/ 220-ish before first coat finish to give it a little tooth.
    2nd coat finish within 24-hours. If longer than 24 hours then abrade 150-180 prior.

    Most try to do Stain 1st day, Seal & 1st coat water poly 2nd day. 2nd coat water poly 3rd day. Some skip the sealcoat if using Dura or Bona stain. Their choice.
    Optional: 155-180 abrasion and 3rd coat water poly, just before final inspection.



    BTW, my customers are flooring professionals, but I have a few painters spraying or brushing on my products with great success. Usually because the homeowner asked them to "match the floor" on trim or doors etc., and they have the list of materials used from homeowner records or direct from the floor person.


    Heck, even the good, penetrating, "hard oils" (2-componant) are not rough to the touch when done, and most insist you not sand past 120.

    [Old Days build was with paste wax. 3-coats overall, 5-coats to the expected traffic areas, 7-coats to the high-traffic paths.]


    .
    GutsyGibbon and HardWorkingDog like this.
  10. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    I guess the application for window replacement is winding its way through the system. It’s a slow process.
    I recall that during the early 80’s the fix for these windows was to install vinyl, spring-loaded jambs and trim the sashes to fit.
    Yinzer Moto likes this.
  11. jar944

    jar944 Long timer

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    You seem to be missing some important parts of that window. What was actually wrong with them?
  12. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    Just a guess but that rope broke on the weight. That is what I usually see.
  13. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    There is, or was, a missing section in the center of the jamb, in addition to the broken ropes.
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  14. lkraus

    lkraus Long timer

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    "Historic" can mean different things in different places, and can depend on which era is being preserved. Storm windows have been around since the 1700's, though they were not really common until the late 1800's. The window in the picture looks very similar to some I know to be from the 1920's, which came with wooden-framed storm windows and screens. I can't really tell what's under the dirt on the pictured window, but sometimes even aluminum storms might be acceptable if they were added before the historical commission rules went into effect, or until other renovations are made.

    The "missing" section that is not shown is the access panel to the weight compartment. Two screws into the angled bit at the bottom held it in place, a similar angle on top tucks behind the top piece of the jamb. It comes out easily, unless some idiot paints the jambs, and sooner or later, they will.
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  15. jar944

    jar944 Long timer

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    Looks like whoever was in there before took out the entire pulley stile between the sub casing and the parting bead.. im guessing to replace the sash cord.

    I love historic sash.. but prefer casements to sliding / double hung.
    20190822_172601.jpg
  16. jar944

    jar944 Long timer

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    Ive not seen a removable section like that before, but wondered with the lower angle cut was factory, but enlarged by a previous repair attempt
  17. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    That entire section was missing. I needed to bust out the table saw.
    Modern casements have been very good to me. A little debris collects around the operator and instead of cleaning the area people crank harder to close the window. Sooner or later something breaks, and I get a call.
  18. lkraus

    lkraus Long timer

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    A similar window, at 4:48 you can see both angled ends of the section. I've also seen access panels with rabbet cuts on the ends, but I think the angles were simpler to manufacture, and easier to pry out.


    Learned about this from Dad, when I was 11 or 12. I needed to know for my Home Repair merit badge and Grandma had several broken cords. He showed me how to repair the first one, watched while I did the second, then went out back and drank beer with the neighbor until I was done. The knowledge was useful when I managed/maintained a college rooming house at 20, but I hope I never need it again.
  19. GutsyGibbon

    GutsyGibbon Adventurer

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    My workbench project is just about done. The hard requirement was to fit in the relatively small 6x4 tool shed. I was able to do that. If I add some shelving I will be all set. Could you guys please suggest ways to clamp down the air compressor tank? When I move it up the ramp into the shed, it moves around. I do not want something like the pressure release valve to get damaged. Here is a pic of this project.
    20190818_171609.jpg
  20. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    [​IMG]
    I am familiar with those casters. The homeowner chose them because they're red.
    GutsyGibbon likes this.