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Clutch slave cyclinder replacement R1150RT

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by manfromthestix, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

    Joined:
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    4,264
    Location:
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    Many thanks to all y'all who have posted stories and photos about clutch slave cylinder issues on your 1150GSs. I read them all and had a very good level of understanding when I tore into this project. AdvRider is such a fantastic resource! :thumb

    All that said, you FFers haven't lived until you've done the clutch slave cylinder replacement on an R1150RT. I bought a new-to-me 2002 R1150RTA on which the PO (a fellow inmate) knew it was needing to be done (because of the age of the bike and reading all these horror stories about failures) but decided to get out of the business rather than do it himself. The bike came with a new Magura slave cylinder and the proper Mickey Mouse gasket and crush washers plus some other cool stuff and tools that made it a killer deal - thanks again, Jeff! I used to have a 1997 R1100RT and loved that bike, so when this awesome deal came along I snapped it up.

    I finally got around to doing the work this past Sunday and HOLY SHIT is it tight in there on the RT!!! I also have a 2001 R1150GS and had completely forgotten how much more difficult working on the RT is because of the fairings, belly pan, footpeg mounting plates, low exhaust, less suspension travel and ground clearance, and all the other sundry stuff that makes the RT different from the GS.

    [​IMG]

    I got it installed and mostly put back together in one long day; it would have been quicker if I'd had all my tools gathered up and 1000 other things weren't demanding my attention. I've owned the bike for over two months and have ridden it all of 60 miles, from our farm to town and back twice twice. :bluduh My wife and I spent ALL of our free time over the last six months building a two-story addition on her business building and my tools were accordingly scattered to hell and gone, so gathering what I needed to FINALLY get down to doing this job was very time-consuming.

    In the two short rides I took the clutch actuation felt just fine, but I was sure the slave was blown and that there has been some minor contamination of the clutch plate as well because it was slipping under full throttle in the upper gears. Of course it could be that the clutch is just worn, or maybe both, so I'll have to see how that plays out once I get it rolling again. I'm hoping that if there was minor fluid intrusion onto the clutch that it will just burn off over time; it only slipped when I was absolutely romping on the throttle. The PO said he'd never experienced slippage so maybe I caught it early enough.

    Step one: secure the bike to the cool "new" lift that it came with:

    [​IMG]

    Remove rear wheel:

    [​IMG]

    This proved to be a bit hard because the lug nuts were rusted in. The bike lived in the deep south and hadn't been ridden much in the past few years so it was a little bound up. Once the bolts were out and I had banged the wheel off with a rubber mallet I cleaned the bolts and hub up with a wire brush and WD40. All is good now. I hosed the final drive unit and swingarm down with degreaser and cleaned that up too. There was some accumulated crud but everything looked fine otherwise. It's been my experience that all these things weep and get cruddy but I am not concerned that this accumulation signals any kind of issues. Now that it's clean I'll keep an eye on it. The tranny and FD fluids were all clean and full, but I'll be changing those and the engine oil as soon as I get the clutch slave issue fixed. It's going to get new tires ASAP as well; they are sitting on my bench waiting.

    OK, wheel off and let's see what we can see? Holy shit is it tight in there!

    [​IMG]

    I could get my arm in there and touch the slave but that was about it, so off comes the rear shock. That means supporting the FD unit with the little jack out of my car, removing the seats, removing the seat adjuster gizmo, taking off the top bolt, and removing the bottom bolt from the shock. I layed the shock on some 4X4 pieces of wood next to the FD unit so it would be out of the way and I didn't have to remove the remote adjuster line and handle. The less you have to dismantle, the less you have to put back together. Brake pads are nearly new, all that looks fine. BTW, this bike has fully linked servo-assisted ABS brakes and they are HOLY SHIT strong! I just about pitched myself over the bars the first time I grabbed a handful to test them!

    OK, that helped a bunch, but it's still really difficult access:

    [​IMG]

    I gave some serious thought to attempting to remove the left side footpeg plate but after discovering that the damned thing has about 40 bolts holding it and 20 other things together I gave that idea up. You also have to remove the left side tupperware to even get at the plate and I didn't want to go there if I didn't have to. So, off with the belly pan and get the exhaust pulled out of the way. Of course the bolt holding the exhaust to the header was rusted to shit so that was a pain, but liberal application of rust breaker plus strong-arm got it free. I was able to lay the exhaust down and off to the left side without having to unhook the oxygen sensor so it would be easier to reinstall.

    FINALLY, "clear" access to the slave cylinder unit!

    [​IMG]

    Well, except for that damned bar and the air cleaner box above. :bluduh Man, is it tight in there. There is significantly more clearance on the GS, plus because of the damned footrest plate on the left side of the bike you can't come in from the side. I gave some thought to removing the airbox but that would entail a massive amount of work; that thing is buried under a LOT of other stuff including the nexus of the entire electrical system. Based on recommendations from other folks that have done this I had purchased a set of ball-end hex wrenches and those things saved the day! You have to come at these bolts at a slight angle and straight wrenches won't work, and there was no room for my socket-end hex wrenches even with a U-joint attachment. I used the long side of the hex to reach the bolts and put a small deep socket on the short end as a handle/cheater bar. The bolts aren't in there real tight so that worked great.

    Uh oh, not good:

    [​IMG]

    As suspected, it's blown. I was able to rotate the slave to the left enough to unscrew the supply line banjo (from the master cylinder, on the left rear end of the slave) using a 4mm hex, pull it off, and rotate it the slave a little further left to get the bleeder banjo removed (also 4mm hex). I had to rotate the thing so as to get clearance for my hex wrench to fit in and have room to turn a bit. The clearance between the airbox and banjo bolts is so tight I actually had to cut off about 1/4 inch from the short side of the hex wrench to get it in there.

    Out she comes! Once the banjos are removed you can rotate the slave and it will drop right down in front of the swingarm. Be sure you have something on the floor/bench to catch the drips (a piece of cardboard works fine) and drape a towel over the swingarm to protect the finish because DOT4 brake fluid will destroy the paint or any other finish it touches.

    [​IMG]

    Yuck, what a mess! That's some nasty spooge. The DOT4 dripping out of the supply line looks clear, though, hopefully that's a good thing.

    The Issue is Clear:

    [​IMG]

    I'm calling this thing a total failure. Clean off the old gasket, clean out the cylinder; it's hard to reach in there but I wiped it with paper towels then hosed it down with carb cleaner and compressed air, and took a little fine steel wool to clean the stuck-on bits of old gasket:

    [​IMG]

    I pulled the pushrod and sadly discovered it had fluid all down it's length and the little felt "washer" was saturated. I had to go rescue my gasket pick from my puppy that decided she liked the taste of it :bluduh:

    [​IMG]

    The pushrod just slides out with zero effort, and I had no issue getting it and the felt washer gizmo back in after cleaning them up:

    [​IMG]

    I used some giant fuzzy pipe cleaners that my wife had used for part of a Halloween costume to clean out the bore where the pushrod goes. No, these were extras, I didn't rob them off her costume! :D I've read about people replacing the seal that the rod goes through (seen in the 3rd photo up) and I'm sure that wouldn't be a bad idea but at this point in time I decided it wasn't worth the effort. There's no way I could get that out and replaced without tearing the bike down much further and I am not going to do that unless I have to replace the clutch. Given that this is SUPPOSED to be a dry rod and seal I don't think it's terribly critical at this point anyway. I've also read about folks drilling a tiny weep hole in the left-bottom of the housing that the slave slips into so that any fluid that gets in there from a failure will drain out rather than follow the rod down into the clutch. However, unless I completely dismantle the left side of the bike (footpeg plate and the rest) there is just no way to get at this spot with a drill bit on the RT. I'll keep this in mind if I have to tear the bike down and replace the clutch someday.

    OK, time to reassemble. Here's the spiffy new Magura slave, new banjo bolt crush washers, and Mickey Mouse gasket:

    [​IMG]

    As widely reported in othe threads, there is precious little grease in that recess so I packed in a shitload of additional wheel bearing grease. Just put a blob on there and press it in with your finger or toothpick or gasket pick :bluduh or whatever. Juicier is better.

    I'm going to have to stop this now and get some work done. I'll post up soon about installation and bleeding.

    Doug
    #1
  2. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    nice write up. Good that you caught it before it left you stranded! did the same operation on my 1150GS twice, first time was a horrific job, the second time I was prepared and it went along in a breeze
    #2
  3. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    So now it's time to put the new slave in and put the bike back together. Easier said than done... After cleaning the cylinder, swing arm, banjos, lines, and everything else carefully I slipped the push rod back in, put the new MM gasket on the slave, then gently inserted it in the cylinder. Getting the new crush washers on the bleed hose and the banjo bolt started without losing the bottom washer was TRICKY; you can't see back there and it's really really tight. After a few tries (and losing the bottom crush washer a few times and having to uninstall and dump it out of the little recesses in the top of the slave) I finally got the bleeder line installed properly and tightened up on the front right of the slave. Then repeat the same trick with the supply line on the left rear of the slave, getting it all snugged down with my sawed-off 4mm hex wrench and deep socket cheater/handle.

    [​IMG]

    Re-installing the hydraulic lines was the hardest part of this whole project and really taxed my patience. During this phase, of course, my wife decided to ask if I was done and could we go for a ride yet? NO. :bluduh OK, then, I'd like to be outside on this gorgeous day so can you get the riding mower out? It's October 30, dear, who cares about mowing the lawn? Besides, the mower is buried in the garage and has three flat tires. I want to be outside and do something constructive! So how about stacking all the firewood I split earlier this week?

    [​IMG]

    I don't really want to do that. Sigh... So stop working on the bike and spend half an hour getting the mower out and ready. Happy wife takes off on it. Back to the bike; put the shock back on, put the seat adjuster gizmo back on, put the exhaust back on, put the rear wheel back on, and now start the process to flush and bleed the system. The DOT4 in the fluid reservoir at the master cylinder looked fresh and clean; I wasn't seeing any contamination as has been reported to have been cycled up in other threads I read. Hmmm, this is promising! Remember, protect the paint! Here's the bleeder hose attachment spot, it's on the right side of the RT near the rear shock preload adjuster and rear brake hydraulic reservoir:

    [​IMG]

    Big BANG from out in the yard and bad-sounding mechanical noises! My wife is back; she's hit a piece of firewood with the mower, flung it into the side of the tack shed, scared the shit out of the horses so they are charging all around the pasture, and bent the blade or something on the mower :bluduh. Great, I'll have to fix that... you can't keep mowing with it until I figure out what's bent. OK, now I want to let the horses out to graze all the fresh-cut grass. Really? Last time we did that they ran away and we spent half the day finding them and getting them home! I'm trying to finish my project so I am NOT interested. Besides, they can graze in their pasture! Do you have a big rope I can stretch across the bridge? :bluduh Sigh, let's just park a car on the bridge, that'll keep them on this side of the creek. Fook, take another break, help her set all that up, she let's the horses out and they go CRAZY galloping all around the yard, crashing through flower beds, scaring the dogs, barking whinnying wife yelling etc. because they're still spun up over the piece of firewood crashing into the tack shed. They finally settle down and ignore all the fresh-cut grass and start grazing in the driveway...

    [​IMG]

    :bluduh OK, back to the flush and bleed project. The master cylinder and reservoir look great!

    [​IMG]

    It's low because a lot drained out when I unhooked the supply line at the slave, but it's very clean:

    [​IMG]

    After all the excitement :bluduh it was getting late so I decided fill the reservoir and let gravity work it's magic while I went to work the next day. I buttoned things up with a plan to come back to the project the following evening after work on Monday (Halloween night). Well that didn't work out, I didn't get back to it until Tuesday night, but it did give me time to hunt down a new 10mm X 1.0 (thread pitch) speed bleeder and a little vacuum pump for bleeding the lines just in case. Finally getting back to the project, I found that gravity had ZERO effect on allowing the new fluid to percolate down into the air-filled hydraulic line. I suspect it might have worked if I'd left the system open (i.e. cap loose and bleeder screw installed) but I didn't want to do that and allow the fluid to suck up moisture and ruin it. So I hooked up the speed bleeder and discovered that without any pressure in the system I couldn't make it work enough to actuate the speed bleeder; I was trying to pump air and that wasn't working. Time for the new vacuum pump gizmo, $30 at Advance Auto:

    [​IMG]

    Hook it up and start pulling zillions of bubbles out of the system with remarkably clean fluid. I never saw any of the nasty black crap that was in the slave cylinder, so I'm hoping this means I caught the failure early enough that only minor contamination made it to the clutch.

    [​IMG]

    The vacuum pump is hooked up to a standard brake bleed screw that I had laying around after putting stainless steel brake lines and speed bleeders on my GS.

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/1150gs-brake-failure-stainless-steel-line-replacement.825120/

    There is a ball valve in the bleed line that has to be opened by inserting the bleed screw all the way, then backing it out 1/4 to 1/2 turn. I discovered that the little vacuum pump wouldn't generate enough vacuum to open the speed bleeder so I had to use a standard bleed screw. I think the little pump would have been able to suck open the speed bleeder but there was enough leakage around the seal of the bleed screw and jar lid that it wouldn't work right.

    [​IMG]

    After vacuuming out a ton of air I started getting pretty much straight clear fluid (had to re-fill the reservoir several times) and was pretty sure I'd flushed all the old fluid out, so I unhooked the vacuum pump and re-installed the speed bleeder. I re-filled the reservoir and GENTLY squeezed the clutch lever; if the master is working correctly you'll see a little squirt from the tiny hole in the middle of the reservoir with each squeeze. CAREFUL - when the fluid level in the reservoir gets low there is enough of a squirt that it will jet out of the reservoir and hit the dash, etc. GENTLE is the operative word when the cap is off. I got some more air out but the clutch was feeling mushy, so I decided to button it all up and take the bike for a spin to warm things up. I rode about ten miles and the clutch was definitely mushy, but working. Back to the garage, check things out, no leaks at the slave connections so all looks good. I put the speed bleeder back in, topped off the reservoir, put the cap back on and tightened it down, and BRISKLY pumped the clutch lever about 15 times while a froth of air and fluid came out the speed bleeder into the catch jar. Riding the bike a bit warmed the fluid up and it was less viscous and flowing better. Remove the cap, fill the reservoir, replace the cap and tighten, more brisk pumping. I did this several times until the fluid coming out was clear and completely free of air bubbles, then I took the cap off and refilled the reservoir, pumped it gently a few more times to make sure everything was working and the fluid level was proper (if you over-fill it fluid will squeeze out all over the place when you put the cap on), and buttoned it all up for good. After re-attaching the bleed line, putting the belly pan back on, putting the side panels back on, and checking everything carefully the bike was ready for a test ride.

    The next day I rode the bike to my office and back, a trip of about 120 miles, and the clutch actuation felt great! There was no more mushiness so I must have gotten a good bleed on it. Unfortunately, it still slips under hard acceleration but only in the upper gears; taking off from a stop or shifting up through 4th it feels fine and I get no slippage but in 5th and 6th it will slip if I really romp on it. I was able to ride at Interstate speeds without any issues and had no problems around town, so I'm hoping I can just burn off the little bit of hydraulic fluid that apparently got onto the clutch from the failed slave. I thought it was a very good sign that there was no discoloration of the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and nothing nasty was flushed out during the bleed. Maybe I caught it early enough and won't have to replace the clutch, but I fear that once the clutch disk is contaminated it can't be un-done. We'll see. Clutch parts aren't terribly expensive...

    http://www.beemerboneyard.com/clutches.html

    ...but I'm not all that interested in tearing the bike down and replacing it since that sounds like a LOT of work. Yeah, Winter is coming but I'd rather go skiing than freeze my ass off in my garage tearing the bike apart. Maybe I'll find time to pull the starter off and look into the clutch, but I think that would mean pulling the left fairing and footpeg plate off = lots of time. Fingers crossed that it will burn off over a few longer rides... My wife wants to go ride the BRP this weekend and I feel OK doing that under the circumstances. If the minor contamination doesn't burn off I'll be adding to this thread with a clutch replacement project!

    Doug
    #3
    spokester and Loutre like this.
  4. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    good write up :)
    #4
  5. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    Oh yeah, as any RT rider probably already knows, the stock wind screen sucks ass. I had a Cee Bailey's +3.5" on my other RT and loved it, so I put another one on this bike (~$200 w/shipping). It makes a YUGE difference in how quiet and protective the screen is - it's also about an inch wider so it helps with wind/rain on your torso and shoulders as well.

    I have a new set of tires for the bike as well and will be installing them soon since the rear is SQUARE and they are both pretty old and the rubber has gotten hard. I did a thread on tires a long time ago, maybe some will be interested in that as well:

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/tire-change-and-wheel-balance-wire-spoke-gs-wheels.148614/

    Doug
    #5
  6. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    Thanks! I actually enjoy working on my bikes but finding the TIME is the hardest part for me. My wife loves to ride with me and appreciates that I keep the bikes in good shape but she doesn't appreciate how much time that can take :D, especially when you can't afford to take them to the dealer for every service. I started doing this years ago when I lived in central-western Wyoming and the nearest dealer was almost 400 miles away = two or three days to have a bike serviced (a day to get there, a day for the service, and usually a third to return home). I did that one time $$$$ and said FOOK THAT! These bikes are not terribly difficult to work on, but the RT does present some additional challenges over the nearly-nekkid GS.

    In another thread GS Addict posted a link to a re-build kit available through Beemer Boneyard that looks promising:

    http://www.beemerboneyard.com/21522335061rk.html

    I think I'll get one of these and have a look at the slave on my GS soon. That clutch still works FINE with over 60,000 miles on it but I think a little preventive maintenance wouldn't hurt a thing, and it will be a walk in the park compared to the RT. If nothing else a person should keep the little bearings greased up nicely. I understand losing that grease is what leads to failure - the rod spins, the bearings fail and take the seal out leading to the leak issues and possible clutch contamination.
    #6
  7. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool

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    I just can't believe that they (Magura) are not adding more grease to the bearing after all these years!
    Glad you did yours.
    Good writeup :thumbup

    Do the bearing PM on your GS, It's very well worth it.
    #7
  8. CT70 Mole

    CT70 Mole Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Helpful hint: The slave rebuild kit that BB sells is a waste of time. When you have a problem, the labor is such where you should just replace the entire slave and be done.
    Yes, we tried it once and it was a fail.
    #8
  9. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool

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    Agreed, the bearing failure is what causes the piston to spin and ruining the seal in the first place. The cylinder bore is usually scored in the process as well. As it it hard anodized honing is not really an option.
    The bearing is not available (I checked with the manufacturer and they advised it is specifically made for BMW just like the paralever bearings and not for sale to end users.)

    The seal kit would make sense if it included the bearing.
    #9
  10. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    Yeah, I got to thinking about that after looking over my blown slave and investigating why it failed. The part that failed isn't included in the rebuild kit, so WTF? Apparently new Magura slave cylinders are NOT available yet, but when they are they'll cost about $105 so that makes the rebuild kit sound like a poor deal - all you get are some cheap fiddly bits and not the real wear item.

    I put the new rear tire on yesterday and HOLY SHIT - the valve stem just fell apart as I was working on it! :eekers I'm surprised I didn't have a total blow-out last time I rode. I'll post a shot or two of the issue on the tire change thread. I had also forgotten how easy it is to slip on a street tire compared to a set of TKC80's! :D
    #10
  11. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool

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    The Magura slave cylinders WERE available at BB. http://www.beemerboneyard.com/21522335061n.html
    They can't sell them anymore due to exclusivity to BMW. Same deal as the little bearing.:baldy

    I had the exact same thing happen to my rubber valve stem - scary thoughts of what could have happened if moving.
    Switched to metal ones right after that.
    #11
  12. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    We got up onto the BRP Saturday for several hours of GLORIOUS Fall riding:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It was a beautiful day but CHILLY up there and we appreciated the excellent weather protection of the RT. We rode about 150 miles, including a stint into Roanoke and stop-and-go city traffic, and never once felt the clutch slip. Of course I wasn't romping on the throttle in the upper gears with my wife on back, but under normal traffic conditions I never felt a single issue. I'll be riding it some more as long as the weather holds and will update the thread with any news on possible issues from hydraulic fluid contamination of the clutch.

    Doug
    #12
  13. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    UPDATE:

    I replaced the clutch slave cylinder in my new-to-me 2002 R1150RT early last November, posting this at the end of the installation discussion:

    The next day I rode the bike to my office and back, a trip of about 120 miles, and the clutch actuation felt great! There was no more mushiness so I must have gotten a good bleed on it. Unfortunately, it still slips under hard acceleration but only in the upper gears; taking off from a stop or shifting up through 4th it feels fine and I get no slippage but in 5th and 6th it will slip if I really romp on it. I was able to ride at Interstate speeds without any issues and had no problems around town, so I'm hoping I can just burn off the little bit of hydraulic fluid that apparently got onto the clutch from the failed slave. I thought it was a very good sign that there was no discoloration of the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and nothing nasty was flushed out during the bleed. Maybe I caught it early enough and won't have to replace the clutch, but I fear that once the clutch disk is contaminated it can't be un-done. We'll see. Clutch parts aren't terribly expensive...

    http://www.beemerboneyard.com/clutches.html

    ...but I'm not all that interested in tearing the bike down and replacing it since that sounds like a LOT of work. Yeah, Winter is coming but I'd rather go skiing than freeze my ass off in my garage tearing the bike apart. Maybe I'll find time to pull the starter off and look into the clutch, but I think that would mean pulling the left fairing and footpeg plate off = lots of time. Fingers crossed that it will burn off over a few longer rides... My wife wants to go ride the BRP this weekend and I feel OK doing that under the circumstances. If the minor contamination doesn't burn off I'll be adding to this thread with a clutch replacement project!


    Well, I have now put about 1000 miles on the RT since the replacement and am VERY pleased to report that the slipping clutch issue appears to have gone away! :clap I am immensely relieved because I did NOT want to tear the bike apart and spend the $$$ and time replacing the clutch. Immediately after replacing the slave cylinder the clutch was still slipping routinely when under heavy acceleration, but it was better than before the replacement. Over the last 1000 miles it has gotten less and less noticeable and yesterday I was ripping around trying to make it slip and could NOT. Even at full throttle and blowing through 100 mph in 5th gear entering the interstate I couldn't feel any slippage. I believe I caught the issue soon enough after the slave cylinder seal failure that only a minor amount of DOT4 made it onto the clutch disk and simply using it has burned it off. Whew!!! BTW, this 15 year old bike runs like a top and rides like a dream. I'm learning to love her like I love my GS :raabia.

    I think I'm finally going to have a bit of time over the weekend to tear down my 2001 R1150GS and do some service work (new battery, brake bleed, new alternator belt, new speedo cable, valve adjust and throttle body balance, etc.). I think I'll pull apart the clutch slave cylinder to check it out, put in some new grease, and then bleed the clutch. I'm a bit hesitant to do this because the GS clutch is working perfectly, but I think preventative maintenance on this item is a good idea. If I find anything goofy I'll post some photos.

    Happy Spring, all y'all!

    Doug
    #13
    GS Addict and jackd like this.
  14. Fidget

    Fidget JM is my FB

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    I'm a bit spooked. New to me '04 R1150gsa with 81k on the clock. 50% of the time I am getting a squeaky rubbing sound out of the clutch when fully released. No slipping and no visible signs of a leak. Supposedly, the clutch was replaced at 50k
    I'm intimidated to jump in and do the slave and have misdiagnosed a far bigger problem. (I've broken expensive parts while fixing cheap ones)
    With my dealer 15 minutes away, I'm tempted to just take it in.
    #14
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    When was the last time you checked the tension on your alternator belt?
    #15
  16. Fidget

    Fidget JM is my FB

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    Never. I just got the bike.
    Dumb question, would the alternator belt go silent with the clutch pulled in for some reason?
    #16
  17. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Alexandria, VA
    Believe it or not, yeah. If the tension is at just the wrong spot, engine RPMs, and even smoothness, can do it.
    #17
  18. Fidget

    Fidget JM is my FB

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,750
    Location:
    Huntington Beach, CA
    I'm kind of a ducati guy, so I'm used to a clutch sounding like a can full of pennies. This just doesn't sound right. Works perfectly everywhere. Spoke with a localish dealer, $600 to replace the slave.(250 parts + 350 labor) I had a '99 r1100gs and an '06 K1200R that had zero drama, so this is a first for me in BMW land.
    #18
  19. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    78,615
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    It is what it is, but if you pay $600 to change it, then maybe an old BMW is not for you. Find an independent to do it, or take 4 hours and do it yourself.
    #19
    GS Addict likes this.
  20. Fidget

    Fidget JM is my FB

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,750
    Location:
    Huntington Beach, CA
    You're right, I'm not paying $600 to have it fixed. I've had to tinker with older stuff in the garage.
    My initial post was stating, I'm not sure what it is, don't want to misdiagnose a bigger problem. I didn't think it would be a bad idea to have a local tech take a peek. They will certainly spot common problems that I have no idea exist.
    #20
    JimVonBaden likes this.