Clutch slave cyclinder replacement R1150RT

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by manfromthestix, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space Supporter

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    When the slave was trashed on my 2002 1150RT the clutch never made any noise at all, it just slipped under hard acceleration (engine revved but it wasn't going any faster). I'm with Jim, start with the easy and obvious thing first, a slipping belt. That's an easy check on the GS 'cuz there isn't any damned tupperware to remove. I have Hepko-Becker crash bars on mine that have to be loosened but not fully removed, then it's just removal of the plastic cover. :D If your bike has 80,000+ miles on it that's something you should check anyway. My 2001 1150GS has only 60K on it and still has the original belt (which doesn't squeal and looked fine last time I checked it) but I carry a spare in my kit just in case. The slave cylinder replacement or service really is not a difficult repair on the GS either because access is pretty good, unlike with the RT that was the impetus for this thread. Bleeding the clutch is very quick and easy as well. The last time I had a bike in to the BMW dealer several years ago their shop rate was $79 an hour and I'm sure it's higher now...

    BTW, the RT is purring like a kitten now, no issues with the clutch after I burned off the bit of hydraulic fluid that made it onto the clutch plate. I love my Beemers; they are remarkably reliable even though they're "old". I spend orders of magnitude more time riding than wrenching on those bikes. :ricky
    #21
  2. sykospain

    sykospain Been here awhile Supporter

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    Chris Harris ( almost re-settled by now, currently in Maine but still living in the RV with the brood ) told me the frame cross-bar that obstructs access to the slave cyl attachment bolts can be taken out, after the wheel, seat and shocker have been removed. That shd make things a tad easier to get at.

    As the seats are off, maybe undoing the three air-box fixing bolts - one at the back top edge and the two pesky hard-to-get-at ones each side above the motor's barrels - and maybe also undoing the crankcase fumes vent hose - in order to lift up the air-box a little, would give a bit more clearance on top of the slave.

    Also, I got told a gem of a tip by Steptoe from his garden shed workshop in south-west London, regarding the awkwardness of getting the cylinder out into a more accessible position ready to undo the 2 banjo bolts.

    He says : - Undo the top nut on the left hand fork. Remember there are no springs in a Telelever fork tube, so just slide it down a bit so you can pass the clutch's braided hydraulic fluid line INBOARD of the fork tube, towards the frame.

    This then will give you enough slack in the line to make fiddling with the cylinder down below a whole lot easier.

    What a great tip ! Many thanks Steptoe ! ( Neil Harrison, www.gsshop.biz )

    AL in s.e. Spain - now with my newly imported UK Rockster all set for registering into the Spanish number plate system.
    #22
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  3. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space Supporter

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    Wow, it was interesting to see this thread pop back up after a long hiatus. For the record, the slave cylinder repair has held up just fine and I never did have to replace the clutch plate. Some fluid got onto it but it has burned off over the last ~2 years of riding and there is no slippage. The bike purrs like a kitten.
    #23
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  4. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    Lol. It took me 2 1/2 hours spread over two days. Then on the test ride I realized there was still some air in the hydraulic lines, so add another 1/2 hour to bleed it again. To that add a half day to power wash because a quart of grease from my grill got thunder-showered onto my deck because I forgot to close the lid while I worked on the bike. :baldy:baldy
    #24
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  5. patrkbukly

    patrkbukly Life at 10,000 feet Supporter

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    This write up and the chiming in of tips helped me tremendously.
    My 2002 1150RT with 50k now on the clock. I am only doing the slave as preventative from Beamers Boneyard.

    What a son of a gun getting it off, and I trued getting thet supply line with banjo bolt in but called it a night. Will pick up maƱana.
    Good news is...I found one hell of a glob of grease but no fluid so I think I dodged a bullet for 17 years on an OEM slave.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #25
  6. patrkbukly

    patrkbukly Life at 10,000 feet Supporter

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    Just to update, new Boneyard slave installed, bike running beautifully but man what a job that is.

    Good feeling to know that wont be an issue anytime soon.

    Thanks again manfromthestix and all other posters on this thread.
    #26
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  7. riobard

    riobard n00b

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    May 3, 2020
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    ireland
    R1150RT Bike not used for 18 months, 18K miles. Today noticed no clutch pressure, and reservoir empty. Would this be a seal drying out and leaking??
    #27
  8. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Unlikely, most likely the lower banjo fitting has rusted out on the clutch pressure line.
    Look for fluid down there.
    The sheath covering it holds water from above and rusting starts.

    The solution was doing the mod below (now too late)



    Clutch hose.JPG IMGP0910.JPG
    #28
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  9. riobard

    riobard n00b

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    thank you for promptness. no sign of any fluid on ground. will check and revert
    #29
  10. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    I read that you replaced the slave prior to storing? or am I wrong?
    #30
  11. riobard

    riobard n00b

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    apologies, new to posting. nothing replaced. '05 bike, 18k miles. always stored. no fluid on ground in storage. last out 18 months ago and no problem with clutch.
    #31
  12. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Pull the slave back and look behind it.
    If there is sludge in the cavity and it is water soluble then the slave is leaking past the seal.
    Seals fail only when the little release bearing starts to seize and starts spinning the piston.
    Don't be tempted to replace the seal as the bore of the slave 99% of the time will be scored.
    It is an anodized bore and honing is not an option.

    FYI: As the clutch wears, the fluid will rise, not lower.

    Report back your findings.
    #32
  13. riobard

    riobard n00b

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    thank you, final ?, would this happen with the bike on its stand and not in users was fine when I ride it last 18 months ago
    #33
  14. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    It may already been happening before.
    You need to find out where the fluid has gone.

    If you find no crud in there lube the little bearing by pushing some wheel bearing grease into the hole.
    They come undergreased from the factory. That is the leading cause of early failures.
    Below is a new slave - notice how little grease is inside.
    This little bearing spins 100% of the time.
    My own GS1150 has over 200,000 miles on the original slave.
    Flushing the system every 2 years and greasing the bearing every 50,000 miles is testament to maintaining the life.


    Slave lube.jpg
    #34