Co2 inflater vs eletric pump

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by tk1250gsa, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    hi I have slime portable pump and very satisfied. But some people using co2 for quick inflation. I just wonder is it risky using electric pump flat tire to top off? Could drain battery on trail?
    #1
  2. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    Keep the engine running when u pump if you worried about it, Problem solved..lol
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  3. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Haha true. Idk why some what reason was thinking have to run bike to charge battery
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  4. hubbydubby

    hubbydubby Rugged Path

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    And you bought a 1250. Is this from passing your test?
    God help us all.
    #4
  5. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    Also correct there, it would charge faster with higher RPMs but idling would at least put your mind at ease :)
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  6. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    I’ve used both. One small cartridge of co2 seated the bead. The next inflated.....I don’t recall what I ended up with psi but I do recall finishing with a 12v air pump and gauge. This was with a tubed tire. I have no experience seating a bead with co2 or a 12v pump on a tubeless rim. I will say the rush of co2 and it’s action surprised and amazed me that it worked so good.
    #6
  7. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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    Trouble with c02 is you need a LOT of cylinders to fill the rear on a big bike (like a GSA), and then you've got garbage to pack out/cylinders to replace, etc.

    They are faster - sort of - if you're good at swapping one cylinder for the next. If you're happy with your slime pump stop worrying about it and ride instead. ;)
    #7
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  8. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    Co2 shoud only be used in a safe green fashion.. like a pellet gun when hunting for birds and rabbit dinner during your adv camping trips...
    #8
  9. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Two co2 did a good job on a tubed Yamaha TW 200 with BIG FAT rear tire. I don’t recall the end result....it was either OK or a bit less or more than required with just two. The thing is when you are out of co2 you are out, with the 12v pump you have air for a few minutes until it gets hot. Wait a few minutes and then you have it again, over and over. It’s a one time purchase.
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  10. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Well I’m pretty new to adventure moto world (ride Harley 5 years before) so far so good. I purchased at March and 7500mi now include cross country and few off road with my minor skill and absolutely love this bike
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  11. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    On a serious note regarding co2 and setting the beads on a tire.

    I rode my 2015 f800gsa 30k miles from Houston to Canada, shipped to London and rode clear across to North Korea down to Iran.

    21 front tubed tire and rear 18 tubeless tire.
    Twice had to change the rear tire and set the bead in the wild..

    Instead of carrying co2 ( which i couldnt carry on airplanes), i had a donor hose that had tire connection on both ends.

    I would pump the front tire to about 65psi and blow it back to the rear.. one of the time, it took about 3 tries because the 50/50 mitas e07.stiff side wall needed massaging

    In any case, pretty confident that's a reliable alternative to carrying co2 cartridges..
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  12. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    We didn’t you use the pump on the rear tire?
    #12
  13. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    You need alot of air/pressure quickly to set the tire bead, something a portable pump cant do.


    If you are pumping up a tubed tire.. wont be an issue as the air can't escape so the tube will expand enough to eventually pop / set the bead for you but if you are tubeless, slow air will escape ..

    the small air pump dont deliver enough air pressure quickly to set it, it will only leak out to the side.

    Now if you have a larger air compressor at the house, thats a different story as most of them can put out 100psi easily..

    But who has a large compressor in the wild.

    Once the bead is set, then yes, you can continue using pump to get it up to desired pressure..
    #13
  14. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Thanks. Clear explanation, I appreciate it.
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  15. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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    When i change a tyre (at home) i always use a little 12v plug in pump to seat the bead. I use some silicone spray lube around the bead and i wrap a tie down strap around the circumference of the tyre bouncing it on the ground rotating the wheel and tightening the strap as i go. I saw this done on an excellent youtube clip posted a few years ago. The older i get the more i feel the need for self reliance.:bubba
    #15
  16. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    If you attach your pump to a bottle then you can get the burst needed to set the bead. Bottles are available with pumps where you buy air shifter kits. The pumps are capable of high 100#+ pressure , just not a lot of volume
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  17. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

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    True, i've seen that done as well.

    Too lazy to carry all those long zip ties on trips.. and when at home, already have a full size compressor..no need to beat myself up lol... good point though..
    #17
  18. scottdc

    scottdc Been here awhile

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    Always go with the pump. I had a plug go wrong once and the tire leaked after filling. I was able to re-do it with a fresh plug but had I used co2 cartridges I wouldn't have had enough to inflate the tire a second time.
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  19. Steptoe

    Steptoe steptoe

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    The thing is you can't just keep using Co2 canisters to increase the pressure in a tyre.

    The tyre pressure at some point will be equal to the pressure in the Co2 cannister.

    When i tested I think it's somewhere around 32 psi.
    #19
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  20. lewisjr1

    lewisjr1 Long timer Supporter

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    With effort, you can find high(er) volume CO2 canisters, but I'd be amazed if you could get one that would seat the bead of a tubeless tire without considerable assistance. Even if so, those larger canisters are bulky & heavy.

    In the field - and thankfully it's only happened to me once, I used a ratcheting strap, a can of spray silicone, and a pretty powerful electric pump to seat a front tire on my '03 Adv. Working in the shade the temp. was still above 100 deg. F, and I spent well over an hour struggling to seat the bead, so the rubber was about as pliable as possible.

    My vote is to carry a good tire plug kit, and at least study some online tutorials about how to use it before trekking out, and a decent electric pump. If your bike has CanBus, then also have a lead or way to power that pump directly from the battery posts.
    #20
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