Coast to Coast Canada in winter??

Discussion in 'Canada' started by paulmondor, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. Alcan Rider

    Alcan Rider Frozen Fossil Supporter

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    Don't know how your 2620 will work, but my III+ never has had a problem down to -20°F/-29°C. You might have to start it out warm, but then it should keep itself going all right.

    And as for riding out to Nome - one rider who has followed the Serum Run on his snowmachine suggested that might be the best time to try it on a bike. He says the trail from Nenana to Ruby doesn't get enough use to keep it hard-packed. But as anyone who has been over the Iditarod trail knows, it can be pretty rough from Skwentna to Nicholai - a real crap shoot.

    Hmm, wonder how hard it would be to put a double track on the back end of a bike...?:huh
    #81
  2. Wheeldog

    Wheeldog Long timer

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    Wandered over here to learn something.....see you are doing the same. :thumb

    Leon is the one talking about going to Nome....eh?.....should be able to do it, but it ain't gonna be easy. We can figure something out. :scratch

    Paul, best of luck on your run across Canada. Get some good gear and do some training, you should be ok.:nod
    #82
  3. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    I was wondering about that-the burn is some rough country and I've seen some pictures of places where biking it is going to be a real chore.

    The Iron Dog route might work though-right after the race itself the trail would be about as packed as it's ever going to get. The serum run route is used by the doggers from Nome to Fairbanks, I would think more doable than the Wasilla to Nome trail, at least on bikes.

    [​IMG]

    And then you could plan this down to the minute and have the winter turn on you either warm, cold or snowy, and screw the whole plan up. Could be an interesting trip!
    #83
  4. dakariste

    dakariste Over and over the hill...

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    I think you might want to add extra gas tanks.

    http://www.touratech-usa.com/shop/show.lasso?SKU=100-1100&-session=touratech:50CB8496C03C7E4269332CAE1E296573


    It is not an easy job to increase the volume of the underseat tank of the BMW F650GS. We have decided to increase the total volume to 39 liters (just under 10 gallons) by adding two rally side tanks. This conversion kits turns the F650GS into a true travelling bike suitable for long-distance trips. You won't find a similar concept that retains the basic structure of the bike anywhere.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    It is easier to pick up with the tanks and bags, if they don't bend too much.
    #84
  5. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Paul ,make sure you start a thread in ride reports when you get things rolling,
    I think a lot more people look in there than here.
    #85
  6. Winterbiker

    Winterbiker Sidecarist

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    Hi from Germany,

    I don´t unterstand all the "Yes" und "No´s" about this trip. Over here in Europe there is a really growing interest in winter riding. To the Elephant Rallye there are about 5.000 entries each year. There are many people, who ride to the northcape in Winter, solos and sidehacks. And - in germany there is published the only motorcycle magazine for winterriding (www.winterfahrer.de). The second issue is out now. And there is published a story with incredible pics of a New York guy, who was riding on the frozen ocean from Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk last winter.
    If I had more time and money, I´d be happy to do such a trip like crossing Canada in winter or going to Tuk or riding to Alaska.

    Greetings from germany, where we have at the time abou - minus 20 Celsius and tmorrow we are starting to the Elephant Rallye and than going further on to the Tauern-Meeting in Austria.

    Winterbiker
    #86
  7. paulmondor

    paulmondor Iceman

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    My feelings exactly!
    Thanks for that.. I agree 100%.:freaky

    Thank you so much:clap
    #87
  8. K2ride

    K2ride Single track mind!

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    [​IMG]
    I say go for it! :uhhuh

    Serious planning & preparation combined with enough time for the jaunt itself
    (plus a bit of luck) are a must but I believe you can do it! :1drink

    You`re welcomed to my place if you can get up the driveway....
    Don`t worry about getting back down; that won`t be a problem if you`re not to particular
    about where exactly you want to arrive down the hill! :lol3
    #88
  9. HighwayChile

    HighwayChile greetings from Wa state

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    #89
  10. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    Hello Winterbiker!

    We're just starting to explore winter riding here in the US. Some guys like Dysco and Snowrider have been doing it for years, Sponge and I are recent entrants and I'm not sure about Dakariste but he's posted a nice thread over on the Pashnit website. I'm using Kenda Trackmaster 760's and 12mm car studs for my winter riding and they work well for me. I've been ridng for 25 months straight here in Alaska, not bad for this part of the frozen north.

    Too bad my German is nicht sehr gut-that magazine looks like my kind of read.
    #90
  11. Winterbiker

    Winterbiker Sidecarist

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    @KL5A
    Great to hear from you and that there are wintermotorcyclist all over the world.
    I guess my English is as bad as your German. Doesn´t matter, I think it would be better after some beers.
    However, studs are not allowed in Germany (but I fitted some on the rear wheel of my combo). Just finished the last preparations to go to the elephant tomorrow.

    C´ya on Monday!

    Winterbiker
    #91
  12. K2ride

    K2ride Single track mind!

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    I`d stick snowmobile carbide studs on this ''rear wheel accessory'' plus car tire studs on the front & crisscross Canada all winter long on backroads! :1drink

    http://www.jpfracing.com/attrax/Attrax_demo.wmv (last part is on snow)

    It`d be more like 2.25 wheels than 2 but that`s Ok with me! :lol3
    #92
  13. paulmondor

    paulmondor Iceman

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    Ok Here is what i have so far!

    1 Drive-on self contained Bike cover (Zippered to keep the bike fully enclosed) in which i will put a 110V automotive portable heater to keep the bike warm at night.
    Light, water proof and vented. made by my girlfriend who also rides but says she will suppport me in thoughts and goodies but will keep her sexy but warm at home while her French Canadian boyfriend is!!! Well you know!!!:huh

    2 Ski-Doo BS2V snowmobile helmet.

    3 Snowmobile suit and Sorel boots

    4 Hippo hands for the handlebars

    5 extra lights for the back of the bike (Small PIAA) so traffic can see me when i ride slower due to conditions.

    6 Aluminum guard for the front of the bike so road sqalt, sands, rocks don't dammage the frame or engine.

    7 Extra crash bars for the rear so if (Hopefully only if) when the bike slides down, my luggage will be protected.

    8 Extended tall Cee Baileys windshield amnd also wind deflectors (A la GS 1150) to protect fet from wind and everything else.

    9 Battery bag with sewed in Heated grips pads in the double walls construction to keep the battery warm when and if needed. Hooked up to bike circuit and also on a 110V voltage transformer to be also plugged in at night.

    10 After debating wether or no to use studs i opted to build a traction cable chain for the rear of the bike.. I will make it with some of the vinyl covered cable that is used to make car winter chains..

    I will post pictures of all the stuff when it is all ready..

    Anyone with further input or ideas is welcomed..

    So far I have 2 brave souls who will accompany me for a little while.

    ZZRon in Dryden Ontario from Dryden to Thunder Bay! And Steve who says he will ride with me from TB to Sault-St-Marie with me..
    if more guys fedel the need to ride this beautiful country of ours outside the warmth of summer and their comfort zones please let me know! We can meet along the road..:freaky

    Only eleven months to go..:clap
    #93
  14. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    I never thought about the wind deflectors for the feet Paul!

    Hmmm, now you have me thinking. I have some 3/8" plexiglass out in
    the garage doing nothing....

    EDIT: do you have the heated visor on that helmet??
    #94
  15. paulmondor

    paulmondor Iceman

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    #95
  16. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Yep, a friend at work has the same one(he uses it on a snowmobile)
    It's impressive.
    #96
  17. cool ish

    cool ish Adventurer

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    I think it could be done if you follow commercial truck routes, unless you were looking for sometghing more adventurous.
    #97
  18. Alcan Rider

    Alcan Rider Frozen Fossil Supporter

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    The only thing I question is the cable chain. Having used those on a semi trailer, I feel that the only thing they're good for is to get past the DOT check station before going over the mountain. I'm sure you'll be checking them out before you embark on this journey. Please give your impression once you do.
    My guess is that I would prefer the following: Loose snow - knobby; Snowpack and ice - studded knobby; dry pavement - studded knobby at much reduced speed; loose snow over ice, or freezing rain - motel.
    Have you thought about some super-bright red LEDs for the rear end for added conspicuity? Negligible current draw, but real attention getters. Could even put flashers on them for extra effect.
    Looks like you're doing some thinking there, Paul. Keep up the good work. :clap
    #98
  19. Mercenary

    Mercenary Mindless Savage

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    One thing you need to consider is the Sorel boots. While they are a great boot, and will serve you well in the cold weather, they might make shifting a real chore. Also the soles of those boots might get chewed up badly if you have some aggresive footpegs.

    Something to think about....
    #99
  20. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    Sorels are fine for riding and shifting. I find that they are not the warmest boots in actual use-bunny boots would be warmer but those would be really hard to shift in, although a heel&toe shifter should make that possible.
    Knobbies with short auto type studs will work well on any road surface. The Kendas I am using get a bit wandery at anything above 60-65 or so, but you should be able to ride along all day at highway speed on the Dysco style knobbies.
    I'm about ready to try a heated visor. Absolutely nothing else works for me.