Coast to Coast Canada in winter??

Discussion in 'Canada' started by paulmondor, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. bross

    bross Where we riding to? Supporter

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  2. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Hey Big Doug:

    We have an ice road here, it's only about 5 km long, but I rode it last year, and had a blast!!
  3. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    Did you stud your tires or did you just ride on some knobbies, etc ?

    There's a 25 km ice road from Temagami to Bear island not too far from here.
    This pic was taken about this time last year.
    I'll have to go check it out...

    [​IMG]
  4. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Kinda embarrasing, but I was just running on Kenda K761's :huh


    The 270's I have on now would be more appropriate....

    [​IMG]
  5. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    We get that happening in April when the ice breaks up on Lake Nipissing. North Bay is on the far west side of the lake, so if you get a prevailing westerly combined with the right temps and ice conditions, the waterfront has piles of really, really really white ice that have blown in off the lake.
  6. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    Cool. I'm running a 270 on the back and find that it gets pretty good traction on hardpack snow. Not sure how it would do on ice, though. I think da bomb would be TKC-80's like Paul was running.

    That looks exactly like my bike LOL (mine's a 2001 with 2005 plastics/tank)
  7. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    The 270's are pretty good on ice. I find the only downfall with them is the
    squirmyness on pavement.
  8. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

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    Been to Kash last year, but the ice wasn't in thick enough yet for that. And Kash is the only place except for Fort Alberni in between Moose and Att. Whole lot of nothing up that way.
  9. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    The girl's (on my daughter's hockey team) mom is from Kash and her dad is from Att. Because we have the College & University in North Bay, we get a lot of folks from up there & also on the Quebec side coming down here to go to school...we get to know them through our kids sports, etc. My daughter even learned to speak a bit of Cree a few years ago from one of her teammates.

    What brought you to Kash?
  10. paulmondor

    paulmondor Iceman

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    HAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH! i want to ride this.. That looks so much fun!!!!
    Damn! I can't type i have a mental erection now!:huh Thanks Doug!

    PS your Ice road idea.. I am in!!! :freaky

    Let me know if it feasable with their permission first!!!
    Are you in???
  11. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    I'll be in for sure (for next year in Feb/March) if it's feasable to do it.
    Let me make some calls...I can probably find out in a month or so.
    This will take some heavy-duty logistics and preparation (for a weekend-long ride LOL), so I want to know what we're up against.
  12. paulsden

    paulsden n00b

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    Hey Doug, Is there anywhere to stay in Attawapiskat and maybe turn this into a weekend trip? To Paul this is a normal day of riding but to the rest of us it could be a challenge to do 250 on ice and snow.

    Paul
  13. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    I'm not sure...that's the kind of stuff I'd have to find out.

    I was thinking I could stay with my buddy if we're just 2 or 3, but I'm sure that DeBeers (yes the Diamond people LOL) has some kind of dormatory setup for contractors that are working up there.

    I've got to talk to DeBeers, Attawapiskat First Nation, Moosonee Town Council, whoever they contract out the ice road to, the OPP and First Nations Police Services & last but not least the Ministry of Health for EMS/Ambulance Services. When you're talking a trip this remote, it's do it right or possibly, die, so making sure everyone is on board is crucial.

    The Band Council is really cool...they gave my daughter's hockey team a big donation that paid for a good chunk of our transportation to the Provincial Championships in Brampton last year.
  14. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    Oh, and it would probably be a 5 day/5 night trip minimum from Cochrane + contingencies for weather, etc.


    Day 0: Travel to Cochrane Load bikes in freight Overnight in Cochrane

    Day 1: Train leaves Cochrane at
    10:45 A.M arrives Moosonee 3:45 P.M Stage & Prep the bikes for morning departure (Garage?), overnight in Moosonee

    Day 2: Morning departure for Atawapiskat, safety/bio stop in Kashechewan, afternoon arrival in Attawapiskat, overnight in Atawapiskat

    Day 3: Atawapiskat - tour the mine, see polar bears, etc. Stage & prep the bikes for morning departure (Garage?) Ovenight in Atawapiskat

    Day 4: Morning departure for Moosonee, safety/bio stop in Kashechewan, aftenoon arrival in Moosonee. Load bikes in freight. Overnight in Moosonee

    Day 5: Train leaves Moosonee at 9:00 AM, arrives Cochrane 2:30 PM
    Bikes off train, loded on trailers. Overnight in Cochrane

    Day 6: Travel from Cochrane

    Which reminds me...I have to speak to the ONR about costs/requirments/scheduling for bike shipping on the train...

  15. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    Ice roads can be fun, as long as you're not the first guy through....

    [​IMG]

    500 clicks of ice road would be more comfortable with studded knobbies, I'm assuming that any laws forbidding studs wouldn't apply on a private ice road?

    We have some here in southcentral Alaska-

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Like many other places in the GWN, access is much easier in the winter, much like at Big Lake. Winter is the only time many of the folks can drive to their houses.

    If the ice road is as nice as in the picture, you guys should have no trouble, I'd still think studded knobbies though.
  16. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    Oh yeah...I would think they'd be necessary. Studs are legal for Northern Ontario residents (membership has it's priveleges) for road riding in winter.

    Of course they'd be legal on the ice roads...I'd just be concerned about them holding up over a 500 km round trip. The (groomed) ice road surface seems more like hardpack snow, similar to a groomed snowmobile trail though, so I'm not sure how necessary they would be.

    I guess I can stud up a set of tires and do 5-6 round trips on the (50 km) Temagami/Bear Island road as a shakedown run. That'll give me an idea about durability/safe speeds, etc.

    Paul, I really should spin this off into a separate thread.
  17. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    The tires I use, Kenda Trackmasters with regular car studs, have held up for 2 1/2 winters and a couple K miles on hardpack, pavement and fresh snow. Ice screws might not hold up so well. If the trip was pretty much all on the ice roads, cat claws might work, if they can hold up to a sled a bike should be easy!
  18. Ridemuch

    Ridemuch Ciao

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    Paul's in the Toronto's Saturday Star. In the "Wheels" section. Fin,did you have someting to do with that?
  19. Big Doug

    Big Doug Been here awhile

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    Yep, 'Bondo' is a good guy...

    Biker crosses icy Canada
    <!-- SPACER DIV FOR SPECIAL ASSOCIATED STORY MUST REMAIN EMPTY--> <!-- ARTICLE TOOLBOX -->
    <!-- SUB TITLE 1 --> The coast-to-coast part was nothing new, but this time he did it in January
    <!-- PUBLISH DATE --> January 27, 2007
    <!-- AUTHOR 1 --> Steve Bond
    <!-- CREDIT 1--> Special to the Star
    <!-- ARTICLE CONTENT--> Travelling across Canada is an amazing experience, even more so when the journey is done by motorcycle &#8211; in the middle of winter.
    Paul Mondor completed the first motorcycle crossing of Canada in winter when he pulled into Cape Spear, Nfld., last Saturday, nearly three weeks after leaving Victoria, B.C.
    Mondor, originally from Joliette, Que., is no stranger to long-distance motorcycling, having previously traversed our country 19 times before.
    Not to mention visiting all 50 of the U.S. states and touring Mexico and Central America.
    Was any point on this ride where the 46-year-old wanted to pack it in.
    "Never," Mondor says tersely.
    "Even when I was scared to death between Wawa and Sault Ste. Marie, and I got into whiteouts and ice on the road. Sometimes, I was down to 5 km/h and they closed the Trans-Canada behind me.
    "When I got to the Soo, I discovered they'd closed it at that end, too, so I was basically alone on the Trans-Canada.
    "I got to the motel and cried like a baby."
    Mondor spent two days stuck in the Soo, waiting for the highway to reopen.
    This trip was more than a year in planning.
    "One day, I was looking at the Atlas and all the places I travelled," he says.
    "I'd done the coast-to-coast trip many times before and thought it would be great to try it in winter."
    For the trip, Mondor opted not to take his trusty BMW GS1150 Adventurer, instead settling on another BMW, the F650 Dakar.
    "I figured it would be easier to pick up when I dropped it, not if."
    And how many times did you drop it?
    "None," he laughs. "Although I came close a couple of times."
    The only modifications to the Dakar were a tall Cee Bailey windscreen, saddlebag supports (for protection in case of a fall), "Hippohands" hand covers, a homemade aluminum deflector to keep frigid air, salt and muck from the engine, and a homemade rear mud guard supplement to keep the same detritus from his back.
    Mondor fabricated some gaiters to keep crud from damaging the fork tubes and another one to protect the shock.
    Luggage consisted of a BMW GS tank bag, soft saddlebags and a duffle bag strapped to the back &#8211; he travels light.
    Low temperatures are the main obstacle in dealing with a Canadian winter but Mondor, a former member of the Vandoos, the famed Quebec-based regiment, says his military background really helped.
    "Even though it was 20 years ago, I used a lot of what I learned about winter training and clothing. My normal body temperature is a couple of degrees hotter than normal, so I naturally deal with the cold better to start with."
    For proper nutrition, Mondor consulted with a friend who owns a health store in Victoria.
    "I used nutrition supplements, vitamins and my friend gave me some cayenne capsules. I only took them twice, but you feel the effects within five minutes."
    Clothing is very important but, surprisingly, Mondor didn't opt for any auxiliary electric vests or undergarments.
    "Nope. I wore a `North 49' two-piece Arctic ATV suit, which was incredible &#8211; it was $199. I wore my fall riding gloves under the `Hippohands' covers with the standard heated grips. Sorel Alpha Trek boots were $450 (U.S.), but worth every penny."
    The BMW has a digital temperature gauge and Mondor had a wind chill chart in the clear map pocket of his tank bag.
    "The coldest I saw was -36 with a wind chill of -61 just east of Winnipeg."
    The high point of the trip "had to be the people I met along the way. I was posting the trip on advrider.com and it was amazing how many fellow motorcyclists offered to put me up if I came through their area.
    "There were lots of messages and encouragement along the way and every time I stopped for gas or to eat, people just gravitated to me."

    http://www.thestar.com/Wheels/article/174984
  20. Bondo

    Bondo Adventurer

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    Thanks Doug - appreciate that.

    I was following Paul's trip on this site and interviewed him by phone from his friend, William Simms' place in St. Johns the day before he flew home. Sounds like quite a guy.

    I think my original title included "Adventurer" or "Motorcyclist" or something to that effect. I don't really care for the word "biker" in this case but I have no control on headlines for the articles. Oh well. I think the piece came off fairly well and gave "normal" Wheels readers a taste of Paul's accomplishment.