Corporate Runaways - Boston to Ushuaia on 2 BMW F650GSs

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Dachary, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Oddometer:
    51,333
    Location:
    Gates of Moscow
    Yeah, we were camped with the YBs. Not a member, just done time with some of them. Ask iRene or Rob Nye about me. :lol3

    Damn Yankees is a good one, you'll enjoy it. Hope the weather is good for it. :thumb
  2. Dachary

    Dachary Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    Boston
    Hey guys:

    Just a quick note to let you know that we're slowly posting more reviews of our gear, etc. on our Corporate Runaways site. If there's anything specific you have questions about, please feel free to email us and we'll reply and write up a review on the site for it.

    And quick aside: the 2 Ride the World folks have had a major setback! Simon's had a pretty bad crash in Malaysia. He hasn't broken anything on himself (although he had some pretty major scrapes and bruises) but his bike is in need of some serious repairs - close to $10,000 worth of parts alone, not counting labor. These two have been on an epic journey for 7.5 years and still have several years to go, and could definitely use your support. So if you're not already following their thread, check it out - and if you can lend a hand, please do! One thing that really struck us on our trip is how awesome the ADV community really is, and we really appreciate all the support we got here - and now Simon and Lisa could use some of that support.

    Hope y'all are having a great summer and doing some awesome riding!
  3. naotweed

    naotweed Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    193
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Glad to see you got your boots sorted out. You didn't even need to go through gore. No more puddle feet. Hurrah :clap
  4. Malcolmlovesbikes

    Malcolmlovesbikes Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Northumberland where we are truely blessed
    Well said I wish I could get my beloved wife to join ne.
  5. Malcolmlovesbikes

    Malcolmlovesbikes Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Northumberland where we are truely blessed
    loving the rr petrol (gas) in the UK its 8.4 USD per us gallon
  6. txnaeem

    txnaeem n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6
    Hey Kay, Dachary - I'm on "Day 46 Fraijane to San Hose, Costa Rica (Again)", but jumped here to just let ya'll know I'm enjoying the report tremendously. I'm also new to riding, less than 3 years, and am also in the IT business - IT project manager in Austin.

    Would love to hit the road with my wife, and we're hoping one day, when we can take the time off, get the guts, and maybe even bring our 5 yr old with us, in the mean time - enjoying riding in spirit with you guys!

    cheers!
    naeem
  7. XR Mark

    XR Mark Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Oddometer:
    17
    :roflThe funny thing is, I read a rr about a kid who put 18,000 miles on a 50cc Honda ruckus scooter over 8mo hitting 33 states. all the scoot needed was general wear items i.e. tires, 1 belt, oil and filter changes etc etc.

    I think the key word was HONDA though. :D

    Give me any XR for this Central and South American trip, thanks.
  8. Dachary

    Dachary Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    Boston
    ...from Boston to Ushuaia, at the very bottom of South America.

    It’s really hard to summarize what that trip has meant to me. It showed me a whole new way of living life; a way of being grateful every day that you wake up, knowing you’ve got a whole day of riding before you, seeing new places, meeting new people and being on the road. There’s a joy in being on the road every day; a rightness in seeing this world we live in, living out of a couple of panniers and spending eight hours a day on a motorcycle.

    It’s the best job I ever had.

    I still remember with vivid clarity those moments of “Wow. I am so lucky to be here. Seeing this. Doing this. With this person I love.”

    They happened frequently.

    We’ve been home for eight months.

    Much of it has been a slow, soul-killing dredge.

    Immediately upon returning home, I felt completely out of place. This wasn’t my “home” anymore. Home was wherever my motorcycle and panniers were. Our apartment seemed extravagantly enormous, and everywhere I looked it was full of “stuff.” So much stuff. Stuff we’d quite happily lived without for four months. Our whole lifestyle seemed excessive, compared to the poor people we’d met throughout Latin America. The city was confining and abrasive; I hated hearing city noises every morning when I woke up, and every night as I was falling asleep. I’d go outside and feel like I was in a strange place.

    It was also difficult to talk to people about the trip. Words couldn’t express how it felt to be living on the road like that. “Did you have fun?” “It was awesome.” But there was no way to convey what a life-changing experience it was. The vocabulary doesn’t exist to adequately express how we felt. We started creating sound bytes we could share with people; our favorite country (Colombia), best food, worst food, etc. Because there’s just too much to share, and there’s no real way to converse about a trip like ours.

    I felt disconnected with our friends and family. I still love them, and I’d missed them while we were on the road, but there wasn’t really any way to share our experiences with them, either. They’d been back here, going about their daily lives, and we hadn’t been a part of them. What we’d been experiencing was so far outside of their day-to-day existence that we didn’t really know how to interact with them about it.

    And of course, returning to jobs we didn’t really care about made it that much harder to do anything. We’d gotten a glimpse of how our lives really could be. Coming back to programming things that don’t make anyone’s life better (or even make them smile) was hard for Kay. Coming back to write about mundane things designed to boost sales, increase conversions or make more money for some company was hard for me. We both lost our motivation - except the motivation to do what it takes to get back on the road. Because it was abundantly clear, in those first painful days at home, that that’s exactly what we needed.

    Over time, we began to adjust to life “back home.” We started resuming our old buying habits (although now, our purchases are much more oriented to motorcycle travel and things that will make it easier/faster to get back on the road). We’ve cleared out a whole bunch of the pointless “stuff” that waited in our apartment, but we’re gradually accruing new stuff. We’ve become re-acquainted with friends and family, and are resuming our old habits of visiting/communication with them.

    On the flip side, both of us have fallen out of touch with what were significant parts of our personality before we left. (i.e. Kay was a zombie fan before we left, but after such a life-affirming and celebratory trip like that, he can’t get into zombies anymore. Me, I’m not really into movies anymore, and only use TV shows for escapism/procrastination.) There are lasting changes that occurred as a result of the trip that I don’t think will ever really go away.

    This barely scratches the surface of the transformation we’ve experienced. Re-integration was literally that; we didn’t just come home and pick up the threads of our old lives again. We’ve made new places for ourself, but I think we both share the feeling that they’re just temporary.

    There’s still a whole wide world out there, and even after our trip, we’ve barely scratched the surface of it. There are tons of countries to be explored; people to meet; languages to fumble through; landscapes to experience and ups and downs to have. There are (hopefully) a million more sunsets to greet; thousands of days of waking up and feeling grateful to be on the road, or seeing something beautiful and just *feeling* the glory of life and this world we live in.

    The trip has made us deeper, richer people, but it’s also made us discontent with sitting still; discontent with our old lives. It’s both a blessing and a curse. But I have no doubt that it will shape the rest of our lives, and we’re going to do everything in our power to get back out there again, share our adventures with you, and hopefully give you a glimpse of the wonder and the life we experience on the road.
  9. NoVa Rider

    NoVa Rider Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,916
    It was also difficult to talk to people about the trip. Words couldn’t express how it felt to be living on the road like that.


    Having spent a good amount of time in wartime West Africa, I can not imagine truer words. Folks are interested, but can't ever be expected to comprehend, what it was like to be there. . .. :nod I don't even try to explain anymore. :cry'

    Outstanding report. :clap:clap:clap
  10. Adventure Trio

    Adventure Trio Wandering

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    635
    Location:
    Wandering south....
    I/we couldn't have said this any better ourselves. It does change you forever and most people don't understand or comprehend it. I have one friend who gets it, that's it. Everyone else....well, they just don't.

    Great report! Looking forward to the next one.

    Be well,

    Terry



  11. nathanthepostman

    nathanthepostman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    903
    Nice words Dachary. Well said. Merry Christmas.
  12. Dachary

    Dachary Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    Boston
    Thanks for the kind words, folks! Yeah - being a traveler like this really does change you in ways that only other travelers can understand.

    But enough introspection for the moment - we've been ruminating on our next big trip, and I'm getting excited about the idea because it looks like we've got a few of the major details decided.

    When we got home from this trip, Kay's dog was "broken." Some negative interaction he'd had with the dogsitters had turned him into a biter - and he'd *never* been a biter before we left. We had to buy him a muzzle and work for months to help him become more comfortable and reliable. He's only *just* getting back to normal, and we've been home for over 8 months now.

    Suffice it to say, I've decided after this experience that the next big trip is going to include our dogs!

    We've been tossing around ideas, and at this point it seems the option we're going to try is to buy one Ural with sidecar. We're going to see if we can travel with both dogs in the one sidecar (one 30 pound Puerto Rican street dog and one 40 pound Border Collie mix). If that works, we'll take one Ural with sidecar and one of our Beemers, and switch off riding the sidecar rig/BMW. That way we can still have the fun of riding a motorcycle, and we can also bring the dogs along *and* enjoy the different but hopefully still fun experience of driving a sidecar rig.

    I haven't talked to Kay about the timeframe yet but I've decided just this morning that we need to buy a Ural this summer so we can try the dogs out with it and see how it works out. (Unless anyone knows someone who has a Ural in New England who would let us try a test trip with the dogs?)

    Obviously traveling with dogs is going to change the dynamic quite a bit. We'll be limited to staying places we can stay with the dogs, which probably means a lot more camping. (Which means upgrading our tent - we went car camping with the dogs over the summer, and have concluded there's no way our 3-person tent is big enough for us, the dogs and our motorcycle gear.) It's also going to take some customization of the sidecar to make it someplace comfortable for the dogs. And we'll be limited to traveling places that will let us cross the border with dogs.

    I intend for us to do some test trips over the summer with the dogs to see how things go - probably a couple of short local trips, maybe 3-day weekends - and then maybe a longer tour around the U.S. where we can easily find camping/dog-friendly places to stay, try the dogs on a longer trip and not have to worry about the border crossings.

    But honestly, I'm totally psyched. Everyone I've talked with has said that driving a sidecar rig is totally different than riding a motorcycle *or* driving a car. I'm psyched to experience it (and also psyched that this solution, if it works, will mean we'll still have a regular motorcycle to ride and can trade off driving the sidecar rig for the fun of a regular bike). I'm also psyched about bringing the dogs along, how it's likely to change our trip and all of the adventures (and misadventures) I think we'll have as a result of adding the dogs.

    And I think I'm going to have a blast sharing those stories with you guys.

    What's more ridiculous than a newb rider taking off and riding the Americas?

    Attempting a RTW with dogs on motorcycles!
  13. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6,845
    Location:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    great getting a perceptive of what happens after one gets back from an epic journey!
  14. Tall Mike

    Tall Mike TAT Rookie (planning!)

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    542
    Location:
    Northeast Oregon
    Neat!

    I think you are successfully re-entering the travel cycle! :evil

    Dogs will give you security... (bike alarm!) ... from a lot of wandering hands in your trip.:thumb
    A lot of this depends on the dog's socialization... Obviously they can't be friendly to Everyone, but they can't Bark at everyone either...there is a fine line to work, but you should have more time with them also...All day, every day! :D

    I look forward to continuing developments! Go Dachary & Kay!! :clap
  15. dirtymartini

    dirtymartini Shaken, Not Stirred

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,717
    Location:
    Harveys Lake, PA
    Operating a sidecar rig is a whole different animal, I had a Ural Patrol a while back. I strongly urge you to get plenty of local sidecar experience before attempting a trip anywhere.

    There are some good instruction books online that I believe you can download for free. When you get your rig spend some time in a deserted parking lot learning to "fly the chair". Then when it happens unexpectedly you will be ready.

    I miss my Ural!
  16. GenerallySouth

    GenerallySouth Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    18
    Great trip. Im glad to see you are thinking about a new adventure. Im doing a similar trip from San Francisco, on a KLR650. Would have loved to be doing it on a BMW. Will be scanning your blog for advice.
    Follow us at generallysouth.com
  17. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    16,487
    Location:
    Huntsville , Al
    Interesting observation about not being able to talk to people about or being able to explain it. I have never done a motorcycle trip anywhere near as adventurous as yours but I have been a die hard rider for over 30 years. I find it near impossible to explain to non riders, or even casual riders what riding is all about. It's something they will never understand. I tend to divide people into two groups; those who ride and those who don't. Being riders AND having done an epic trip like yours must make it even more impossible for people to relate to you.

    Not having done a trip like yours means I can't really understand it either but reading your ride report and others has at least given me a glimpse into your world.

    I am looking forward to following your future adventures.:clap
  18. Dachary

    Dachary Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    Boston
    Thanks, Nathan! I've gotta say, you're kinda a hero of ours for your epic trip on Dot - we send people to your RR and book all the time as an example of what people can do if they just make up their minds to *go* - regardless of planning, having the appropriate tools, bike, gear, enough cash, etc.

    Heh. I'm actually marginally concerned about this. My dog is *extremely* protective any time we take him in a car - if we're stopped at a stoplight, he barks his head off at anyone walking down the sidewalk or anywhere near the vehicle. And going through a toll booth or drive through? We have to grab his collar to make sure he doesn't lunge at any arms coming into the car. I'm a little concerned that he's going to be overly vicious in "guarding" the sidecar - but I guess the alarm element might come in handy. Other than this, though, I think he's going to be great as a traveling companion. Less sure about how Kay's dog will take to all this, but that's what test trips are for!

    We've been told this by pretty much anyone who's ever driven a sidecar rig, so we're expecting it to be like learning to drive a third category of vehicle. We stopped by the New England Ural Dealer a couple of months ago when we were out at a regional BMW club breakfast thing, and sat on the bikes, climbed in and out of the sidecars, checked out the farkles, quizzed the heck out of the guy there, etc. I saw a book there about piloting a sidecar rig, which I think I might swing out there and pick up in a month or two when it gets a bit warmer. I'm actually really excited about adding a third bike to our stable (although we're going to have to work out the logistics of where to keep it because there's no way it'll fit through our gate with the sidecar attached).

    Conveniently, we've got an empty parking lot nearby where I practiced on the Ninja when I bought it (it was less than 2 years ago - seems like such a long time!) and then the Beemer when I switched to it. Only fair to break in a Ural there :wink: (Plus it has speed bumps, so I should be able to get a bit of air and really experience the full monty!)

    GenerallySouth - I'm jealous that you've got it all ahead of you! (Although not jealous about your off in Belize - OUCH!) Consider me subscribed, although it feels weird that *I'm* reading ride reports to get me through this winter. I'd tell you to have fun, but I know you will! (And if you have any questions we can help with, just shoot me a PM or email - we're happy to chat route, etc.)

    It's pretty much the same thing. But I will say that before the trip, I did spend time trying to explain to non-riders and casual riders why I love riding, why I was psyched about the trip, why I'd get up at the butt-crack of dawn to go get battered to bits falling off my bike on a tricky dirt road, etc. After the trip, I've sorta given up trying to explain (and trying to talk about the trip in any detail). Some people will *get* it, and some people won't - and no amount of explaining is going to bridge that gap.

    But since getting the bikes back home, we have been spending more time with other motorcyclists. The folks in the Yankee Beemers, our local BMW club, at least get it somewhat. We've had some nice rides in Mass with some of the club members, and getting to eat at the end is always fun :D

    Ultimately, I've made peace with the fact that there's a part of my life that very few people will ever be able to relate to. And that this is *always* going to be in my blood - I'm *always* going to want to be out on the road eventually, even if I do appreciate the chance to recharge at a home base. I just hope I'm in a position to keep riding until I'm too senile to drive, because this is a big part of who I am now, and I don't want to see a time when I can't keep doing it.
  19. kitesurfer

    kitesurfer Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,994
    Location:
    north florida
    another option would be a one wheel trailer for the dogs. you can by one ready made for $2500 or less from www.thirdwheeltrailers.com or there are various self made one out there for dogs too. show a pic to a welder ....

    for camping, check out the new tenere expedition 2 from REDVERZ http://redverz.com/tents.html
  20. Dachary

    Dachary Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    Boston
    Hey folks:

    In case any of you are interested, my motorcycle blog has gotten a refresh in look, a new URL and an updated concept: Ain't No Pillion.

    I still get a lot of questions about the gear we use, farkles on the bikes, etc. so I'm switching formats to do at least one review and one Q&A every week (starting today - finally posted *my* review of the Loobman Chain Oiler!)

    I'll still use it for random motorcycle-related musings, etc. and Corporate Runaways is still going to be our trip site, but the update to my motorcycle blog gives me something motorcycle-related to do until warmer weather arrives.

    Enjoy!