craigslist prices

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by ArtCuisin, Oct 18, 2018.

  1. ArtCuisin

    ArtCuisin Adventurer

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    I won't cloud this one with my views as I probably have narrow views, but I am generally
    incredulous about a good third of craigslist ads in terms of why people try to sell things
    as they are for large asking prices. But even that doesn't cover my raised eyebrows. I'm
    sure others are much more astute. I am interested in what other people think about
    ads and prices and which ads are bonkers to many. Maybe opinions here will have
    an effect on ads--probably not.
    #1
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  2. Bultaco74

    Bultaco74 Been here awhile

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    They're on crack.
    #2
  3. DCrider

    DCrider Live from THE Hill

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    Greed, we all are inherently stingy about potentially leaving cash on the table.
    #3
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  4. whisperquiet

    whisperquiet Motorcyclist

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    I am going with stupidity.......especially sellers asking what they owe on a bike. Like, $2000.00 over what the same bike goes for new.

    Plus, some people think every POS 1970s Japanese motorcycle is worth restoring even though it is solid rust.

    See Craigslist shitheads for more examples.

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/craigslist-shitheads.983882/page-98
    #4
  5. Chaostrophy

    Chaostrophy Been here awhile

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    Same thing with vintage motorhomes, I've got one of the GMC ones (73-78), and you see people with absurd valuations not selling as the real value of it goes slowly negative over the years (you'll pay $1000-1500 to get a salvage place to take your mh). Some were nice coaches when they put the for sale sign in the window :-(

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    #5
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  6. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    It's the socially-acceptable way to negotiate.

    Try it. List something on CL for a realistic price and stand firm. You'll have several buyers walk away because you won't dicker.

    So, ask a fantasy price, and start working from there...it's much easier to get the mark, er, buyer, to accept what you really wanted and think it's worth.
    #6
  7. Rhoades

    Rhoades Been here awhile

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    I think a big chunk of it is loans. I have called and made offers on a couple bikes and offered realistic values. The buyer says they can’t go lower because there is still a loan on the bike.
    #7
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  8. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    That's part of it. The other part is, how motivated is the seller.

    Someone who would just-as-soon keep what he's advertising, is going to be less flexible than someone, say, moving, who really wants to unload.
    #8
  9. rokytnji

    rokytnji Adventurer

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    Or Meth. Being a regular craiglist user < consumer > . I have found killer cheapo deals < saddlebags, trannys, motorcycles, engines> , and dealt online with sooooooo many deceased body's, divorce, gimme your email address, I will list it on ebay, yaddda boom bang.

    So I guess if you want the good.
    Swallow it with the bad.

    If you are gullible and can't read a person after 5 minutes in front of them. I pity the fool.
    Takes me a little longer, online.

    Some of my blocks
    #9
  10. Amphib

    Amphib Adventurer

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    I cringe when dealing with craigslist. People seem awfully proud of their junk. Tho I did find a mint altrider hemisphere tank bag last week that was painless and fair. I have had much better luck with Facebook market place. At least there you can sort of vet the person.

    #10
  11. upperleft

    upperleft Adventurer

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    I browse craigslist and Facebook marketplace almost daily, just because I like looking at junk people are selling. I think there are 4 main categories of posts on any sort of platform where please sell things.

    Category 1.
    This category consists of the posts where the seller has something they decide they want to sell. They post their item at a reasonable price with the hope of selling their item in a reasonable time frame, without having to spend a lot of time or energy making the sale.

    Category 2.
    These are the people that don't want to deal with their stuff, don't care what its really worth and just want it gone. These are the people that you can get a good deal from, but these are also the items that sell within hours of being posted.

    Category 3.
    These are the people that don't really want to sell their item, or don't need to sell it. They list their item way above what it is worth and will just leave it posted thinking if the right person comes along maybe I can get more then this thing is worth.

    Category 4.
    Sellers and traders. These people (at least most of them) look for items to buy in category 2 then turn around and try to sell them as category 3.

    I believe prices on used bikes or really anything with a used market can get driven up by the category 3 listings that never get removed because they are priced so high, then the category 1 people see those listings and price their item for more then it is worth based off the other comparable listings.

    Also some people just get ripped off then try to sell their bike what what they paid for it. Or people are just idiots and think their things are worth more then they actually are.

    just my $.02
    #11
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  12. brgsprint

    brgsprint Been here awhile

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    I get a kick out of the people that post complaints on CL about other posters. The self appointed CL police.
    #12
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  13. Macgyver007

    Macgyver007 Adventurer

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    I agree with upperleft. there are different types of sellers and different reasons for selling and pricing. I think there is also a category 3.5. I have made out pretty well watching items that started out over priced but slowly come down in price to reasonable levels. Sometimes things I've had my eye on creep down in price over time and then have a large drop signifying the jump to category 2 after the seller comes down to reality and gets tired of dealing with it. Personally I have bought 5 bikes on craigslist over the last 10 years or so and had overall good experiences. Really no matter what the list price is, you never know what the real bottom dollar is until you communicate with seller. If the price is high and seller won't negotiate or is unreasonable then don't waste any more time, but if you are dealing with someone who will come down you can tell pretty quick. Be polite without sounding over interested and make reasonable offers. I once got a nice dr350 for $1200 even though the ad said $2250 firm. There are good deals to be had but unfortunately weeding out the trash is just part of the process. Check ads frequently so you don't miss "the deal" and pay attention to dropping prices. It helps if you aren't in a rush to find something.
    #13
  14. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    I've been on CL since 2005, buying, selling, trading, getting rid of stuff and getting free stuff.

    It's like any other tool, if you know how to use it, it works fine.

    OTOH if you have unrealistic expectations of other people, well, you are setting yourself up for disappointment. If you expect OTHER people to live up to YOUR idea of how THEY should act - well, again, you are setting yourself up for disappointment.

    IMO the most important thing to remember when dealing with online sales is: Don't take it personally, it's just business. ;)
    #14
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  15. upperleft

    upperleft Adventurer

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    Another thing to remember when trying to haggle on CL is that is it much more effective in person. I used to always try to haggle through text messages before I even got to see the item for sale. I found most people are only willing to budge a little on the price over the phone, but then you are kind of locked into that price when you go see the item, unless there is a major issues that was not listed in the ad. You have a much better chance at getting a deal if you go see something in person but you have to be completely willing to walk away with nothing. Make sure the seller knows you are interested but point out the things you don't like or things that will be expensive to fix, then start haggling. By this point you should know some things about the item and the seller that will help guide your decision on a offer. A lot of times people will let something go for cheaper when you are there with cash in hand just because they see the money, they see your truck ready to load up their stuff, and they don't want to go through the whole process of getting another buyer out to see what they are selling.

    I also sometimes have my girlfriend say stuff like "we don't need another bike" or "this looks like a piece of junk" or "I don't think we should be spending money on this" Then I have a private conversation with my girlfriend and come back and tell the seller. "my girlfriend said I can only buy it if I can get it for under $XXX.XX" I like this method because I can low ball something for under what I know its worth and blame it all on my girl :)

    If you don't know anything about what you are looking at, make sure to bring a friend that does. Just pointing out that a chain, sprocket, fork seals, and brake pads needs to be replaced and understanding the amount of time and or money it will take to fix the items is a good bargaining chip.
    #15
  16. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    My wife likes to do that, but the funny thing is I've been on the other side of that conversation too. Listed my Pathfinder for sale last year at what turned out to be a too-low price and had people coming out of the woodwork to buy it. First person to look at it says "we like it but it needs X, Y and Z" (which it absolutely did but I still had it at a below-market price.) So they offered me about $500 less than my asking price. I smiled and said "my phone is ringing off the hook with people who want it. The price is $XXXX, take it or leave it." They took it.

    But it always helps to know (or have a good idea) what an item is worth before buying OR selling. I had my R1150R listed for $3500, then $3300, then $3000. At $3000 I figured my highest offer would likely be $2500 and at that point, I pulled it off the market since it was worth at least that much to ME.

    My wife always likes to bargain (she grew up poor, and is used to having to pinch every penny) but me, I like to come up with a price that I think is fair. If the asking price is what I consider fair, I have no problem paying it. Same goes with selling - come up with a realistic idea of what you want to get from an item, and if someone offers that price, take it. Often when I sell something the wife will say "you could have gotten more if you'd done this, this or this" (usually involves offering on more forums or listing in different areas) and my response is usually "yes, but that would have required more of my time and effort and my time and effort is worth money to me."
    #16
  17. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    Of course, there are always people on CL and other sales forums that are trying to harvest the low hanging fruit. They'll text you a ridiculously low offer in the hope that you're just trying to get rid of something and might snap at a cash offer even if it's half the asking price.

    Some people get pissed off or offended at that (and honestly I used to) but there's no reason for that. Go back to my cardinal rule: It's just business, not personal.

    Funniest was when I had my R1150R listed for sale or trade (trade for another bike) and someone wanted to trade me his 200k mile 1997 Buick that needed work. :imaposer Yeah, I'll trade a working bike for your broken old hoopty. :csm
    #17
  18. ivantheterrible

    ivantheterrible Long timer Supporter

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    another perspective on the 'it's just business' thing. I think, assuming the pictures in the ad shows the condition of the bike reasonably well, and the ad is written well, all questions of how flexible on the price the seller is, should be answered before you come see it, imho. In the case of the hoopty buick it could be the difference in getting a laugh through an email, vs. some guy setting a time, (in which case you might have had to rearrange your schedule to accommodate them) they arrive, ask a bunch of questions, walk circles around the bike for half an hour, then pop the question about the buick.:lol3 or some other nonsense. I think I'd have trouble keeping a 'it's just business' state of mind.

    I just sold a vehicle last week and a couple tried some 'good cop, bad cop' bullshit. The car was so reasonably priced that I got more response than I've ever gotten, and sold the car in 36 hours of the ad going up, for my asking price. The 'good cop, bad cop couple' were the first to come see it. After half and hour of seeming to be sincerely interested, the routine started. Just a ridiculous waste of my time. It was clear they had no thought of buying the car unless they could get it for an absurdly low price. That's not a cool thing to do to people.
    #18
  19. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    Well, I'm not saying I've never had bad experiences. I've had a few people pull some weasel-y shit on me. Put the wife's Grand Vitara up for sale back in 2012. A few tire kickers came by but no offers were made. Then a guy contacted me, very anxious about seeing it. He was insistent, constantly emailing and texting and asking when he could come by and see it. Eventually our schedules meshed and he came by and looked at it. We agreed on a price and he said he would have to arrange for the money. I told him I would take the ad down and I did. Then a week or so later, after he failed to answer some of MY emails, he called me back and said he couldn't get enough money and would I take an amount that was about $500 less than what we agreed on.

    Now, truth be told, even with $500 off, the amount he offered wasn't bad. But it pissed me off that he pulled that crap on me after we had already agreed on a price. I was also pretty certain that he was just trying to squeeze a little more money out of me, sensing that I was in a hurry to sell, and that also pissed me off, so I basically told him to get screwed and lose my number. A month or so later I re-listed the car and sold it for a little more than the price I had agreed on with the flaky dude.

    Another time I had my 4runner for sale and a couple came over, took a test drive, and we agreed on a price. Again they said they'd have to arrange financing. This time I was savvy enough to say "the ad doesn't come down until I have cash money in my hand, and if someone offers me more, I sell to them." Sure enough, they strung me along and eventually stopped returning my calls. Once again, I was able to sell it a month or so later for more money anyway (to a dealer, no less!)

    Overall, though, I have to say that my buying/selling experiences on CL have been good. One of my two current bikes was purchased on a CL sale and it's still running strong 5 years later. In fact, now that I think about it, the only bike I've sold in the last 15 years that WASN'T sold on CL was one I sold to an inmate here (my '08 Scrambler.)
    #19
  20. dfwscotty

    dfwscotty Long timer

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    If I am not in a hurry to sell a bike I am probably going to mark it up a little high.
    If I am in a hurry to sell you're probably going to get a good deal from buying what I'm selling.

    I have no issues with anyone pricing a bike high. I think the same thing. He's in no hurry. If it's a bike I'm interested in I may follow the post to see if they are dropping the price any. If not then I'll move on.
    #20
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