CRF500L V2.0

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by michaelkozera, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    trip was great.

    clocked a total of ~2,450km's of which ~900km's was on road, the rest was all off-pavement/ off-road.

    allitle disappointed tho, as most of the trails we went on we could not get to the end due to snow/ice. this winter in BC is abit strange, feels like winter came 2 months late, but also stayed 2 months late too......... normally by april 95% of the trails are melted/open.

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    dad on his trusty lowered XT250

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  2. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    im finding it difficult not riding with a wind screen.......

    also not having stupidly powerful lights is also abit annoying.......


    crf250l rally? stuff 500 engine in?


    ive got issues lol...........
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  3. DrHeinrich

    DrHeinrich um.... huh. Supporter

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    Awesome to read thru this again. Yours and the other CRF500L's are f*cking inspiring. Curious about the new and "lighter" twins that are now on way, but what I love about these is the ultra-low maintenance/ultra-high reliability of all of the components. I would so much rather wrench hard for a few weeks than be doing KTM levels of maintenance and wondering if/when something will go amiss.

    I just have so many projects in my life... Guess I will keep rolling on the DR a while longer.

    Any further thoughts on the rally? They certainly weigh more. Questionable whether the skid plate could be modified, etc. Thoughts on the ABS on these bikes? (I've never had a bike with ABS and there have been a couple road moments when I wish that I did in the past few years.)

    Also, did you ever discuss the lack of a cush drive in the original thread? Thoughts/wear/issues after so many miles of riding?
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  4. bbanker

    bbanker Been here awhile Supporter

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    Pay attention Honda! This is what the CB500X should be. Period.
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  5. MillennialFalcon

    MillennialFalcon Improvement starts with self

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    I don't think Honda is listening, I see a lot of CB500X's on the road.
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  6. Liuk

    Liuk n00b

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    dear invincible XR400R ... how much i miss you.
  7. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    A ‘CRF500T’ perhaps... the CB500X suits a lot of people just fine as it is, as MillennialFalcon suggests below:

    Nothing wrong with putting that engine in another chassis derivative at some point too though I’d agree.

    Jx
  8. bbanker

    bbanker Been here awhile Supporter

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    True, my wife loves her stock CB500X
  9. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    me and the wife are planning a round the world trip in the next few years here. im looking to buy a crf250 rally, the question becomes do i convert it to a crf500 rally, or just leave it as a 250 rally??

    to be honest im leaning more towards leaving it as a 250 and slapping a cbr300 engine in it, or a BB kit, or both. as i would like to keep it light and reliable, might even leave it a 250cc even..... crf500l has been very reliable, but at this point its more of a weight thing.


    as for the cush drive.
    after ~1/4mill Km's the chain/ both sprockets are wearing at a normal rate. the advantages of a cush drive are negated as long as you shift smoothly, which i do.



    ive been in touch with honda years ago, i was told that there is absolutely no market for a mid sized twin cylinder 400-800cc dual sport bike, and that my idea/creation is silly and everything that i did honda knows better.

    funny cuz nowadays the new craze is all about em mid sized bikes.:loco:hmmmmm


    having ridden several cb500x's i am actually very impressed with that bike. it's like a car equivalent of a cross over. it does everything very well. and it does not break the bank while doing so.
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  10. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    Owning a near-stock CRF Rally, I will say this - it's a great all-rounder and damn-near bulletproof bike if weight isn't a primary concern, but a stock one does weigh a fair bit (mine is a hair under 350 lbs with a rear rack, tool kit, and a full tank of gas) and a lot of that added weight over the stock CRF250L is high up - albeit with a fair bit of it being stuff like the toolbox, exhaust, steel handlebar, and gas tank that can all be replaced with lighter bits or deleted.

    The fairing is brilliantly sized and set-up, too, though there is plenty of steel and a large LED module in there which add to the center of gravity. The fairing allows reasonable comfort up to just about any highway speed limit you're gonna find internationally outside of places like Germany and the Western USA, too. The stock motor does start hitting the classic thumper challenge of fuel efficiency against air resistance once you get much over 75 mph, and really prefers to cruise around 65-70 mph, but I have hit 84 in a sprint to pass a big rig truck. I'd want better tires and suspension if I were to try that again.

    The 289cc internals from the CB300 line will fit into the 2017+ CRF-L motor for a bottom/mid-end torque boost and a tiny bit extra top speed, just gotta do some ECU work - I have not done this yet, as I want to get my suspension reworked by someone like Cogent first before adding any extra power.

    If weight is the greatest concern, I might consider fabbing a fixed fairing/tower for a base 2017+ CRF250L, but otherwise if simple durability and RTW reliability are the goal, I recommend it pretty highly

    I almost bought a CB500X but the dealership nearest me sold theirs just before I could go in to see it, and they got the Rally in only a few weeks later so I bought it nearly immediately and haven't regretted that decision. I'd love to pick up a 500X eventually though, for touring use, as I loved the Versys 650 I got to ride in California but want something with a tiny bit lower of weight/CoG.
  11. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    what do you mean it needs ECU work?

    when i did the 305BB kit on my crf250l the stock 250 ECU worked just fine. i mean sure , ran like shit for the first 300km's but once the ECU re-learned all its setpoints for the new 305cc it ran perfect in all conditions. i ran it as a 305bb for about 70,000km's. engine ran fine the entire time.
  12. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    In that case I meant for the motor as set up with the 289cc Honda parts - it's a stroke modification and not a big bore, so timing changes more significantly
  13. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    interesting, i never really thought about that, but yeah if you bore a piston then the timing does not change since its just wider. but if you stroke an engine then yeah timing would change slightly due to the fact that ignition of the fuel may need to be changed as it traveling vertically in the engine.
  14. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

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    Not just thumpers. It's every bike, every car; basic physics. And thermodynamics.

    On a cold day I struggle to get good fuel efficiency, regardless of speed.
    On a warm day I can get fantastic fuel efficiency below about 40, great fuel efficiency between about 40 and ~65/ 70mph. Sometimes a little more than 70. FE dives off a cliff at over 70. And turns on the jets at 95- 100mph. And adds rocket boosters at 120mph. And that's about where the aero overpowers the horsepower.
    On a hot day you might get good FE. You might not.

    Sample size; 3 different Africa Twins. All DCT.
    3 different W124 Mercedes. All automatic. (130mph governor though. Probably good for 145mph.)
    2 different vintage BMW 2002s. 4 speed manual.
    1 E34 BMW 525i. 4 speed auto.
    1 Saab 900. 5 speed manual.
    1 Toyota Corolla. Lets not ever mention that appliance again.
    1 1980 VW Golf 1.1 liter.
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  15. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    Oh for certain, it's basic physics and you can't change that

    I meant more that, where a more touring-oriented motor can punch through that wall of air resistance with relatively minimal stress (especially something like a Gold Wing, Hayabusa, or any other bike with a decent bit of aerodynamics applied to its design), the CRF250L gets to 70-75 and you immediately feel it even with the Rally fairing. There's just not enough motor to exceed 85 without a tailwind or really thin air

    Will be curious to see if overhauling the suspension and putting on slightly smoother Shinko 705s (which are still plenty capable on gravel and fire roads) will do much to help its confidence at those speeds above 70 mph - frankly, my concern at those speeds is less about exceeding 80 mph and more about increasing stability when I'm cruising at 75-80 mph to match other traffic
  16. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    our RTW trip we will be going only 60-80km/hr (35-50mph) the entire time , so air resistance and top speed is irrelevant.
  17. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    Yup, like I said above, the top speed "issues" are primarily a first-world problem. The motor is especially unstressed in the kinds of road speeds seen internationally, and I get great mileage and comfort at that speed range around 80 km/h.
    michaelkozera likes this.