Crime in Baja . . . discuss.

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Pelon, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    No, check out this http://www.msndc.msn.com/id/243289/#storyContinued
  2. Gregg Wannabe

    Gregg Wannabe Just killing time

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    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/mexico/tijuana/20080427-9999-1n27tjshoot.html


    13 people killed as rival gangs clash in Tijuana




    By Sandra Dibble
    UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

    April 27, 2008

    TIJUANA – A confrontation between rival criminal gangs left 13 dead and nine injured early yesterday in gunbattles that started along a major thoroughfare and continued near a private clinic where police exchanged gunfire with injured suspects.
    The shootouts were among the fiercest the city has seen in recent years. They come amid a spike in violence along Mexico's northern border as drug gangs battle one another and face off against law enforcement agencies that have stepped up efforts against organized crime.


    The dead appeared to be members of criminal cells linked to organized crime, but their identities were not revealed, nor would officials name any specific criminal organization, saying the investigation was continuing.
    The injured included eight suspects and one federal police officer, authorities said; none of the injuries was life-threatening, they added. The suspects are in custody.

    The confrontation began off of Bulevar Insurgentes, a major avenue in eastern Tijuana. The street was nearly deserted in the early-morning hours when heavily armed assailants shot at a line of parked late-model cars, some with California plates. Seven people were killed in the initial gunfight, which was called in to authorities at 1:40 a.m.

    An eighth victim was found shot to death in the back of a pickup abandoned a couple of miles away. Three others were found dead at different hospitals where they had apparently been taken for treatment. Two suspects were later killed at a private clinic in Colonia Herrera after a confrontation with members of Baja California's State Preventive Police.

    “There is a war all along the northern border, not just in Baja California,” Rommel Moreno Manjarréz, Baja California's attorney general, said at an afternoon news conference. “Evidently, we are facing one of the most dangerous, terrible events that we have lived through in recent months.”

    Investigators seized 21 vehicles believed linked to the incident. They also seized 54 weapons and counted more than 1,500 spent cartridges at the various crime scenes.

    Daniel de la Rosa, Baja California's secretary of public safety, said municipal, state and federal agencies were working with the military to strengthen security around the city. “In this fight against organized crime, there will be no going back,” he said.

    Hours after the shooting, life had returned to normal on Bulevar Insurgentes. Families decorated picnic areas with balloons at Morelos State Park, several blocks away. Across the street from the initial shootout, shoppers pulled into the Smart & Final, and customers stopped at an adjacent plaza that included a liquor store, a pharmacy and a medical laboratory.

    Curious drivers slowed and craned their necks to see the bullet holes that pocked a wall and pierced windows of the liquor store.

    “I just wanted to see if it was true, and yes, I think it's true,” said Artemio Carbajal, a 51-year-old cab driver. “If this happened, it's not because they were sitting in church reading the Bible. This affects all of us psychologically.”

    The violence comes as President Felipe Calderón has vowed an unrelenting battle against the cartels along Mexico's northern border that smuggle drugs into the United States.

    Since January, the measures have resulted in numerous detentions, both of alleged criminals and police officers suspected of cooperating with organized crime; they have also led to deadly confrontations as criminal groups fight one another and confront police. Six people were killed on one day in January, including a Tijuana police officer shot at his home along with his wife and 11-year-old daughter.

    The Arellano Félix drug cartel, long the dominant criminal organization in Baja California, has lost key leaders in recent years, leaving smaller cells to operate more independently, U.S. and Mexican experts say. Some groups have expanded from drug smuggling to kidnapping and extortion.

    Drug-related violence has plagued Baja California for years. The worst occurred in 1998 in El Sauzal, outside Ensenada, when drug cartel gunmen under the influence of cocaine and alcohol shot to death 19 people, including women and children.

    Yesterday's incident follows a tense week for Baja California law enforcement after Gen. Sergio Aponte Polito, in charge of military forces in the state, went public with allegations of dozens of cases of police corruption. The general's allegations, published in daily newspapers, were in response to a challenge from the attorney general that Aponte offer proof of previous allegations about police corruption.

    The general and the prosecutor apparently mended fences in Mexico City on Friday. In a television interview late Friday, Baja California Gov. José Guadalupe Millán said all of the general's allegations would be investigated. “We are only going to look ahead, to give more and better results, as citizens are demanding,” the governor said.



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  3. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Two women robbed and threatened with rape and murder at gun point in Comitan just north of La Paz, they have the license # of the car but the cops are no help.
  4. haggeo

    haggeo Been here awhile

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    <table style="border: 1px solid rgb(187, 187, 187); margin: 0em 1em 1em; float: right; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 85%;" border="1" cellpadding="2"><tbody><tr align="center" bgcolor="#3399ff"><th colspan="7">Crime Rates in Mexico per 100,000 inhabitants</th> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ccffff"> <td>
    </td> <td>2000</td> <td>2001</td> <td>2002</td> <td>2003</td> <td>2004</td> <td>USA in 2004</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Total Crimes</td> <td>1433.81</td> <td>1439.41</td> <td>1391.54</td> <td>1521.93</td> <td>1503.71</td> <td>4118.76</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Murder</td> <td>14.93</td> <td>15.13</td> <td>14.11</td> <td>13.94</td> <td>13.04</td> <td>5.62</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Murder with firearm</td> <td>3.45</td> <td>4.54</td> <td>3.66</td> <td>3.53</td> <td>2.58</td> <td>3.25</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Assault</td> <td>254.35</td> <td>257.39</td> <td>260.39</td> <td>260.41</td> <td>251.91</td> <td>NA</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Aggravated assault</td> <td>171.06</td> <td>172.02</td> <td>185.01</td> <td>187.33</td> <td>186.68</td> <td>310.14</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Rape</td> <td>11.89</td> <td>11.9</td> <td>13.33</td> <td>13.05</td> <td>14.26</td> <td>32.99</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Theft</td> <td>148.27</td> <td>108.11</td> <td>100.22</td> <td>116.74</td> <td>112.47</td> <td>2445.80</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Automobile theft</td> <td>161.15</td> <td>161.52</td> <td>162.10</td> <td>150.66</td> <td>139.86</td> <td>432.12</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Robbery</td> <td>316.54</td> <td>274.63</td> <td>219.59</td> <td>158.16</td> <td>146.57</td> <td>145.87</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Burglary</td> <td>145.72</td> <td>153.58</td> <td>142.58</td> <td>NA</td> <td>NA</td> <td>746.22</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Fraud</td> <td>54.63</td> <td>50.48</td> <td>50.96</td> <td>54.64</td> <td>61.47</td> <td>NA</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <td>Drug offenses</td> <td>20.62</td> <td>23.97</td> <td>24.65</td> <td>23.38</td> <td>23.40</td> <td>NA</td> </tr> <tr align="center" bgcolor="#3399ff"> <th colspan="7">Source: 7th<sup id="cite_ref-0" class="reference">[1]</sup> and 8th<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[2]</sup> Survey, United Nations</th></tr></tbody></table>
  5. Macedonio

    Macedonio n00b

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    Its the first time i use a Discussion Forum, im Rodrigo Isla from Mexico City, Im 36, I have a KTM 950 i just bought very good condition.

    I had a KTM 640 Adventure and i did with a friend this same trip you guys want to do, we can help you and we can give you tips, we had travel a lot in Mexican Republic, and for us, nothing had happened, yes you got to be aware, also in Guatemala, the only place it was kind of dangerous was at night in Guate city. all the rest it was very nice, as i said maybe we got lucky.

    We took from Mexico City a day of March 2006 and we were 2 950, and my 640 (not the right bike for such a long ride on road) and we took of in Palenque Chiapas. a lot of miles for one day, but finally we sleep there, and the next day we took the ride to the Frontier of Guatemala at Rio Uzumacinta, we visit Yaxchilan, which is an arqueological mayan ruins (must see) in the side of the river, then we place the bikes in some minny ships to cross to Guatemala and to look for a small town named Betel, where we went to an office to place a stamp to our passports, that is a normal procedure for people that cross in bycicles, or walking, not ofthen in heavy bikes.

    I want to send pics, but i have to make them lower in size . there is a lot to see in mexico, and in Guatemala, for my style of trip, it was a lot of road. but excellent curves.

    Catch yu later to continue.

    Rodrigo Isla
  6. 2 Wheels

    2 Wheels .

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    Thanks for posting.
  7. Gregg Wannabe

    Gregg Wannabe Just killing time

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    I read this thread every week and appreciate the information shared here. I do not think that crime is worse in Mexico than in the U.S., but it is different. Just like there are some places you would not go or things you would not do in the U.S., there are some things you should avoid in Mexico.

    I still go down to Baja, in fact I spent 4 days last week around San Felipe and Puertecitos on my bike and had a great time, but one should pay attention to what's going on around them.
  8. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    One good place for updated news both good and bad is the Bajanomad forum, lots of posters that travel there frequently and live there. New attempted assault between San Ignacio and Guerrero Negro foiled by throwing coke bottles into the air and hitting the assailants windshield. Wouldn't want these sob's after me on a bike.
  9. Gregg Wannabe

    Gregg Wannabe Just killing time

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    I would hope that this thread would continue to be a source of information about what is going on in Baja along with input from those, like yourself, with real knowledge about how best to safely enjoy the Baja experience.

    As I posted earlier, I will continue to enjoy Baja but I have definitely changed my habits based on what I have learned here. Let's keep sharing knowledge and let the individual decide what to do with it.
  10. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Ignorance is bliss, just as knowlege is power, you choose.
  11. Pelon

    Pelon Dia Por Dia

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    "Preocuparse por" = to worry.

    Pretty broad generalization there, Kiko. A good friend and business associate who maintains his offices in Tijuana recently has sent his family from Tijuana to San Diego to live. He armour plated his car, and employed a body guard, but that wasn't enough to keep him from worrying about his children and his wife. So, now they live in the United States.

    Most of Mexico is extremely safe, but there are places (cities and corridors alike) where a heightened sense of caution makes sense. I have plenty of Mexican friends who refuse to go to certain parts of Tijuana . . . but perhaps border towns are different.
  12. Pelon

    Pelon Dia Por Dia

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    Your stale is another man's fresh. Every day, there are people venturing to Baja for the first time. This forum is a great resource for those travelling by motorcycle, and I would expect those persons to want to know the current trends, risks, etc.

    Knowledge is power. Of course, statistics, anecdotes, stories, etc. can be manipulated to create unjustified fear and negative impressions. However, stories about robberies of SCORE participants on the cuota, tourists on the carretera b/n San Ignacio and Guerrero Negro, and drug war battles played out in Rosarito are, in my opinion, incredibly valuable in terms of trip planning.

    Does it mean people should not go? Of course not, and anyone who suggests otherwise probably doesn't fit the definition of adventure motorcyclist. But, it would be foolish to suggest that we should not keep these sorts of issues in mind.
  13. Pelon

    Pelon Dia Por Dia

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    You rightly allude, though, to what has become my mantra: Mexico as a whole, and the two states of Baja California in particular, is always where I'd rather be. I have travelled the world both on business and for pleasure, and nothing compares to the incredible feeling of decompression that comes from passing south through the mountains below Ensenada. I plan myyear around my southern excursions; I love the people, the culture (and at times the lack thereof :evil ), the food, and the way of life . . . y las mujeres . . . me encanta ver las mujeres.
  14. Gregg Wannabe

    Gregg Wannabe Just killing time

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    Pelon (Baldy?)

    You nailed it, Baja is incredibly decompressing. Whereas for most vacations I need 3-4 days, minimum, to get into the vacation mood/mode, in Baja I'm in manana mode almost immediately. I can usually feel my shoulders coming down the first day.
  15. Sparkdaddy

    Sparkdaddy aventurero

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    Just read the title but I got pick pocketed last week in Cabo.
  16. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    I avoid Cabo for about the last 10+ years. The new name is Cabo San Ludicrous.
  17. Pelon

    Pelon Dia Por Dia

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    Yep. But 1 1/2 hours away is La Paz, which is beautiful, and still (despite its size) has the sleepy feel of Baja from days gone by.

    All of Baja is changing, though. Loreto has yuppified, Mulege got ugly, Guerrero Negro now is even UGLIER than before, etc. Attitudes from the mainland are creeping in, and people seem more fast paced and frenetic than ever before. Still, it is a wonderful place.
  18. Pelon

    Pelon Dia Por Dia

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    1. Do not ride at night (particularly on the highways);
    2. Do not drink and ride;
    3. Even if not riding, avoid drunkenness. Very easy to become a victim when you don't have your wits about you.

    As to riding alone . . . I am torn on that one. I definitely think it makes someone more vulnerable, but if you handle yourself correctly and are familiar with Mexico, it shouldn't be a problem. I have ridden all through Baja and mainland Mexico on my own on numerous occasions. I have had problems, but nothing I couldn't work my way out of. Speaking Spanish helps, of course. If you don't speak the language, at least bring a dictionary.

    Finally, avoid certain people. Hate to generalize, but I steer very clear of younger men driving brand new trucks and/or SUVs with tinted windows. Throw in a couple of gold chains and ostrich boots, and I am actually inclined to ride in the other direction.
  19. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Yeah I love La Paz, my wife and I spent 5 days there last summer, and surrounding areas, the great beaches at El Sargento. We went to Todos but had no desire to drive the 45 min to the tip. The drivers in La Paz are something else, don't stop at stop signs, just slow down and what ever you do don't stop for pedestrians even in cross walks, the locals will honk and flip you off if you do.
  20. Sparkdaddy

    Sparkdaddy aventurero

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    That sums up drivers all over Mexico.