Cruise control opinions

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by HLC, Jan 31, 2019.

  1. HLC

    HLC Adventurer

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    Lots of folks seem to have a strong bias toward motorcycles with cruise control. It seems to me that if one's doing mostly day rides on variously twisty back roads - say in the 200-300 mile range (a typical day of riding, for me at least) - you may never really need or want cruise control. If you have a bike with cruise control, how important is this feature to you, and when and how often do you use it? And assuming that you like it, why do you like it - e.g., physical limitations like achy wrists, not having to always watch your speed because of cops, etc.?
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  2. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    For a long distance blaster it's pretty important. If nothing else, its one less thing to worry about. It may sound crazy if you've never had cruise on a bike, but taking away the mental "work" involved with watching/maintaining your speed can now be used to just watch the road situation. Doesn't sound like much but after say, the 500 mile mark its quite nice.
    #2
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  3. Gordon Bennett

    Gordon Bennett Just you wait

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    I couldn't see the point of it until I had a bike with it fitted, started to use it and found it useful.
    We have an increasing number of average speed cameras in Britain, and cruise control is good for those situations.
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  4. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Why do you ask?
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  5. 131unlimited

    131unlimited Been here awhile

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    All my older HD's had a throttle lock that I loved. Very easy to use and it always helped if my hand got the tingles for a few seconds, it was easy to take my hand off and give it a shake or two or if I need to adjust my glasses, etc. My current HD has cruise and it works, but it takes a button push to engage it and then a separate switch to set the speed, no biggie but more work that the throttle lock for when I want to just shake my hand for a few seconds and not drop speed. I do like the Cruise every once in a while on a long highway trip, it is good to lock it in and rest my throttle arm at my side and switch up positions on the bike to get more comfortable while eating miles.
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  6. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    I use the cc on my street bike pretty much every time I ride it. Whether commuting, riding somewhere in town, or obviously on longer trips. In town in helps not to speed and I can just keep my eyes up. Out on the open road the benefits are obvious. I used all manner of throttle locks on previous bikes and they certainly help to give the wrist a rest but they don't offer the other benefits that real CC does. The two methods aren't even comparable IMO.

    I am sure some numbnuts will be along shortly to suggest if you are using cc on a motorcycle you are riding the wrong roads, etc... Yeah, whatever, ignorance is bliss. If you just don't want or need cc that's fair enough but please, if think you're some sort of of purist for not using cc, enjoy the cactus.

    I also use the CC pretty much anytime I drive anywhere. Rented a car a few months ago for a road trip that had the distance controlled CC and thought that was worthwhile as well. It's annoyances were all pretty much attributable to the actions of the shitty drivers around me.
    #6
  7. HLC

    HLC Adventurer

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    FWIW, I recently bought a bike that doesn't have cruise control at a great price. One of the most commonly cited reasons why this particular bike (Honda VFR1200X a.k.a. Crosstourer) never sold well in the US is because prospective buyers want cruise control. In all my years/decades of riding I can honestly say that I never thought about wanting cruise control while on a ride (a long day of riding for me would be, say, 300-350 miles). My assumption is that I must be missing something others are appreciating (or my average rides aren't long enough to have "tired wrists (?)"), so I was just wondering "why the appeal?"
    #7
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  8. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer

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    Even on day rides, it allows you to pay attention to your surroundings and enjoy the ride more during straight riding periods. I agree with others...its mostly to keep from speeding and to keep from having to look down every few seconds.

    If you live in a twisty area, then maybe it isn't useful on day rides.
    #8
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  9. Bultaco206

    Bultaco206 Back-to-back motos suck Supporter

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    Count me as one of the minority that doesn’t care for it. I felt disconnected from the bike. Much like with DCT transmissions.
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  10. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    Depends on your usage, but yeah I'd say if you have rides where you go a couple hundred miles as a hobby ride, and your speeds need to vary often due to terrain and such, then CC might not be all that attractive an option. If you're commuting regularly on the same free flowing roads where you don't have to adjust speeds, then it's handy. Same for travelling to/from somewhere for any reason.

    Basically, if you're travelling in such a way that you'd like CC on in your car, then it's good on the bike. If your moto is just a toy for you, then don't worry. If it's also transport, than it's a nice option.

    Me: I'd like it sometimes, like when I have a 2hr+ trip to one of our other offices. It's a situation where I actually have a time I need to be somewhere for a leg of the journey, so slab is the most efficient and reliable option. Droning at a constant speed is a great way to numb my hands, so being able to keep the throttle hand off for a while would be cool.
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  11. saltspray

    saltspray Been here awhile

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    My numbnuts opinion...

    My work bike has it...I never use it.

    My personal bike doesn’t...I don’t miss it.

    I don’t need or care if my bike has CC for the type of riding I enjoy.

    If I routinely rode long and boring stretches of road, I could see the appeal.
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  12. CacklingCrow

    CacklingCrow Been here awhile

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    Riding through Kansas to visit my Dad in OKC blows. A throttle lock will do it, but cruise is sooooo much nicer.
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  13. jmlmjmjm

    jmlmjmjm Long timer

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    I used to set mine getting on the freeway! Used it all the time. Heading to the curves there are always stretches of relatively boring roads before the fun begins.
    #13
  14. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    I agree with Car and Driver magazine. Cruise has become redundant. I didn't use mine on my car the last 5 years I owned it. Using the QE2 between Edmonton and Calgary as an example, traffic volumes have doubled in 20 years. You're forever boxed in. It's not safe to lock in a speed.
    #14
  15. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    I have it on one of my bikes, and find it useful, especially on long rides. As was said earlier, it frees up some of your attention dollar to be used on scanning for hazards, etc.
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  16. SRTie4k

    SRTie4k Northeast Explorer

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    I won't buy another primary bike without it. I use it whenever I'm on the interstate or a long stretch of straight road. Absolutely love it.
    #16
  17. Need For Speed

    Need For Speed Is that a cop?????

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    I have a Throttlemeister on my ZX14R that I use between the twisty bits on 600-700 mile days that I typically ride (no interstates or long straight stretches). Having to constantly adjust it is a pain, but it does provide a little relief to the throttle hand between the windy sections.

    I love the true cc on my FZ-10, I always use it - again no fwy, just backroads.

    YMMV
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  18. MauiCowie

    MauiCowie Long timer

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    It's one of the first things I install on any bike I buy. (Street bikes anyhow.) I tour a lot and usually do at least 400-500 miles a day on non-slab roads.

    Pros:

    1 - Make decent time without getting tickets. When I'm not riding twisty roads I just set it at 8-9 over and don't have to worry about getting a performance award.

    2 - Safer. Since I don't have to be constantly glancing down at the speedo I have more attention available for situational awareness. It also allows me to enjoy the scenery more.

    3 - More relaxed, less fatigue. Since I don't have to worry about cops or be looking at the speedo all of the time and have better situational awareness I can ride longer days (I often ride 12+ hours per day) more relaxed which reduces mental fatigue so I can rise those longer days without getting tired.


    Cons:

    None. If I don't feel like using it I don't have to.
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  19. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer

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    As stated and not often enough in Robbinsville, NC
    I think the only time it is advisable not to use cc is in slow moving bumper to bumper traffic, or when driving in heavy rain. Otherwise, it is only unsafe if you are not completely aware of your surroundings. You can still tap your brakes, or cancel the function if you need to slow down. Too many people are not aware that you can also throttle up when needed, and the cc will then return back to the original setting.

    I had a throttle lock on my 2010 GSA, and it worked OK on the highway in Florida, but it was a pain once I was in varying elevations in north Georgia. My Ducati Multistrada has cc, and I now consider it invaluable for highway travel, and I also use it for commuting on back roads here in Florida, or on certain roads in WNC where it goes from 2 lanes to 4 lanes (median in between).

    The NC State Police love those sections - $$$. :nod
    #19
  20. ThumperStorm

    ThumperStorm Long timer

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    I like having a throttle lock on my bikes just so I can bend my arm and get the blood flowing. Most bikes I've owned vibrate and my arm needs a break once in a while. Riding with a numb, aching or tingling arm is no fun. Plus I might get an itch I can only reach with my right hand.
    #20
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