CSC TT250: Was $1895 in Nov 2015

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Tim_Tom, Nov 30, 2015.

  1. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    I will have an exact measurement as soon as the new battery comes and I can take apart the side cover but I would say about a 1/2 inch too tall. It won't clear a plastic piece with a screw in it. Today I took my TT250 out of storage and sure enough the battery is dead. Actually very strange things happened. When the ignition switch was set to on nothing happened. No lights no instrumentation nothing. However when I switched the ignition off the digital display did its test sequence for a few seconds or so. When switching the ignition back to on the display would turn off.

    It has been a really long time that I have seen it but perhaps the battery polarity reversed itself? Again I have only seen it a few times and that was like 30 years ago. Had a deep cycle marine battery that was not used in a while somehow reverse itself over a season. Had a car battery randomly do it in an old Honda Civic but its not something I have seen lately!

    Tried to kick start the TT250 and I got a few good kicks but then got to a point when every time I was fighting the compression. It had not been ran in a while so it needs some good solid kicks to prime the carb. Should have the replacement battery in 2 or 3 days. Once in I will grab my tools and the new battery take it to my storage unit and swap it out. Won't take long!
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  2. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    Today I got the new battery in from CSC. I put it on the charger and I was happy to see it was already at 100% charge. CSC either sells a ton of these batteries and/or they take very good care of them. Over the years I have purchased Factory Activated batteries from various online vendors and when I received the battery it was already halfway dead. Luckily this one was at 100% charge!

    Install took about 10 minutes. Interestingly the new battery is not as wide as the original battery. So after install I had about a 1" gap in the battery holder. Since my TT250 is currently in my storage unit I did not have access to much. So as a temporary solution I peeled off a piece of cardboard from the battery shipping box and shoved that in there. It will work until I find and cut a piece of foam which will probably happen when I need to remove the side cover again.

    Its interesting the fit and finish on the Fire Power battery is actually pretty good if you care to get excited about such details. Technically its not a China battery but a Vietnamese battery. Last bike that I had with a Vietnamese battery lasted for several years. So I have high hopes this Fire Power battery will last a long time. Its funny I own a few Chinese bikes and being Chinese really does not bother me but for some reason Chinese lead acid batteries I am not interested in. I have had a lot of friends over the years that buy a cheap Chinese battery from Amazon bragging how they saved $25 to $50 and then it craps out after 6 months to a year. One of these days like a lot of things I expect the Chinese batteries to break out quality wise and last as long as any. However I don't think this has happened yet from the feedback I have seen. So for now even in my Chinese bikes I prefer a better battery!

    I did bring the Yuasa YTX7L-BS battery along for a fitment test. Its just about 1/4 to maybe 1/2 inches too tall. I suppose if you are clever you can make it fit but it certainly won't go in. Some sort of plastic support piece is in the way.

    Have not tried firing it up yet. It was pouring down rain when I put it in but I hope to get it out tonight or tomorrow.
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  3. Working_Hardly

    Working_Hardly Been here awhile

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    Yeah, I haven't had much luck with Chinese batteries either, at least as far as wet cells are concerned. Although, I did get three years out of the TT250's OEM battery; but then again, I still only have 1200 miles on that bike, so not so hot mileage wise. Both of the wet cells that came with my RX3 and RX4 only lasted a couple of months. I have had excellent service out of the Chinese AGM battery that I installed in the RX3 back in December of 2015. It is still going strong. The RX4 is now rocking a Shorai lithium iron battery, with no issues so far.
  4. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    I got 4 years out of my TT250 battery which I thought was very good for that type of battery especially lately. Your standard wet cell batteries are not exactly particularly well made by anybody now. Even the old school Yuasa wet cell batteries are pretty much crap now. Its all about the AGM, Gell and Lithium batteries that get all the quality these days.

    When I bought my 2015 RX3 the battery failed during prep and I needed a battery. So I went to my motorcycle dealer and got a very expensive Factory Activated Yuasa battery for it. I am still on that battery and they typically can last 7 to 10 years in my area. If you actually get 7 to 10 years out of these batteries I think they are worth the high cost. My RX4 still has the original battery it shipped from CSC with. As far as I know its still okay but I noticed a bit odd behavior on the charger lately. If its not on the tender for a few days it takes upwards of an hour for the tender to indicate greater then 80% charge and another few hours to reach 100% charge. If its off for a day and then I plug it in it seems fine. It might be nothing but it could be if its not ridden every day it will be very weak or dead. When the RX4 battery goes I might go ahead and get an expensive Yuasa for it since I have had such good luck with them in my RX3. I should be back on the RX4 in a week or two. I road it some when I bought it then put it in winter storage last November. Because of Covid 19 it has been slow going getting to everything. It does not help I got so many bikes!
  5. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I’ve got 16 months and 10,000+ miles on the Chinese battery in my SSR Buccaneer.

    Charles.
  6. Working_Hardly

    Working_Hardly Been here awhile

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    I ran into a similar issue on my RX4's battery. Basically, it developed an internal short and was self discharging. So much so, the battery tender could not supply enough current to keep up with the drain. I pulled it and put it on an actual charger; it reached 12.8 volts and cut out, like it's supposed to, but then after disconnecting from the charger it began to steadily lose voltage over the next couple of hours.

    As for my TT250, I don't know what did it in specifically; but I did have to add a ton of distilled water to it at one point, shortly before it failed. It is possible that the tender was overcharging it, damaging it in the process. I am installing a Shorai lithium iron battery in it now, like the RX4; hopefully I won't have to worry about it again for 5-6 years. The Shorai batteries use their own dedicated balance charger (that you have to purchase separately), so I will disconnect them at the end of the year, charge them, then let them sit until I need them. That's one of the nice features of the lithium iron batteries - very low self discharge rates. Once fully charged, they hold it a long time. They don't need to be babysat via a battery tender.
  7. Mr Slowski

    Mr Slowski Adventurer

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    I normally have to crack the throttle open while kicking to get it to start. On mine there is a sweet spot.
  8. Working_Hardly

    Working_Hardly Been here awhile

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    Most wet cell batteries tend to do well if they are used regularly; problems only seem to crop up when the usage scenario is intermittent, like in a motorcycle that sits for 4-5 months of the year. My RX3 OEM battery was actually pulled from the bike, charged and stored for two months. When I went to reinstall it, the terminals were badly corroded due to some kind of electrolytic reaction and it would not take a charge. This is one of the reasons that I try to ride my bikes regularly year round, weather permitting, in order to "exercise" the batteries and prevent these kinds of issues. Problem is, the weather doesn't always cooperate.
  9. Working_Hardly

    Working_Hardly Been here awhile

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    I seem to recall a video that CSC put out on kickstarting the TT250, back when Gerry Edwards was the service manager, in which he stated that you needed to hold open the throttle a little, in order to kickstart it successfully. This would have been on the CSC blog, back in 2016 when they were making preparations to bring the bike to the US.
  10. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    For my AGM batteries I plug the tender in and forget without issue. However for my regular wet cell batteries I plug the tender in a few times a week but only for about 10 minutes at a time. Maybe occasionally a little longer just until the green light goes solid on the charger. The theory is supposedly a battery tender will evaporate the water out of the battery. I heard a lot of yes and no regarding this theory. The battery maintainer companies seem to claim it won't ever evaporate the water out of the battery but I have seen countless threads on various motorcycle forums that they do in fact slowly evaporate a standard lead acid battery. Seems to work okay and the other standard wet cell battery in my fleet (SG250) still works good with this practice. I do expect it to quit at some point this year or next perhaps!

    For now I am sitting on way too many bikes and this Covid 19 plus that fact that I am not getting any younger might be a turning point. I am okay with a lot of bikes but I am beyond that now and most only get ridden a few times a year. I like what I got but its getting tough. Interestingly maintenance is so spread out its not expensive but its definitely harder wheeling them all out of the garage all the time. Many of my bikes have no choice but to sit around for a bit. I believe all batteries prefer to be exercised a bit. Even a regular AGM battery does not like to sit there even if its on a tender. I have observed some odd behavior from AGM batteries after a while if they sit a long time. Usually that odd behavior will go away once the bike is ran but its not known what long term damage it does? For the most part I still get vary long life out of my batteries except for few duds occasionally. For example occasionally the batteries will mysteriously always be charged at 100%. You plug the tender in and the light goes solid instantly. I have seen this on dead batteries but occasionally it happens on good batteries as well. Also I got a few batteries that after a while the tender light never goes solid. Just flashes green for days. Usually after a few riding cycles they start working normally again. I have learned that if a bike is in long term storage its a good idea to turn on the ignition switch and let the fuel pump prime if it has one. I believe this exercises the battery a bit and maybe the fuel pump and computer as well. You will be surprised how much energy this process uses. Of coarse after an hour the tender will bring the battery back to full. Have not noticed any odd behavior from extended storage after doing this practice. You are only talking maybe twice over a winter so not much is all that is needed.

    When I get an opportunity I am going to try and kick start my TT250 using the kick starter again. I think its good practice to figure that out as it will save your hide when the battery fails or perhaps the starter motor fails. I would not be surprised if you have to crack open the throttle a bit as I have to do that even when using the electric start. Sometimes you forget because you don't normally have to do it on a fuel injected bike. However I do have a few scooters that you do have to pin the throttle to get it to start if its been sitting a really long time.
  11. dp064

    dp064 Been here awhile Supporter

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    That's my experience with this engine (in a SG). I twist the throttle just a bit on the kick down and it fires right up.
    Don
  12. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    WOW this machine just amazes me. Typically I don't much care for anything with a carb now days even after sitting 9 months it fired up like it was ran yesterday. I am sure when I kick started it the other day that was sufficient for priming the carb. It was about 69F outside and I used half choke. Typically on my TT250 I don't need any choke except for when it has not been ran a while. Started up on first hit of the start button and ran great. It would not hold idle for the first few minutes so I had to nurse it a long but once I got moving it was fine. For the first few miles noticed some cob webs in the throttle occasionally but that worked itself out!

    Started really fast with that fresh battery. Much faster then it ever did with the stock battery. Only thing is the piece of cardboard I shoved into the battery tray did not hold long. After a while I could feel the battery knocking around. So tomorrow I will pull the side cover and try to engineer something with foam and maybe some zip ties or something!

    When I got home I dumped the old oil and replaced with fresh Chevron Delo 400 15W-40. The old oil had been in there for 3 years and maybe 1000 miles in that time period. Oil still looked great with only a light metallic sheen on it. I think I am about 2,000 miles total on it.

    I think one of the things that helps is I use a special brew in my gas. I use 1 oz per 5 gallons of TCW3 but I often double that dosage in the carb bikes that will be sitting for a while. I also use an expensive fuel stabilizer called Pri-G. Even though the TT250 sat for 9 months on ethanol fuel it did not seem to bother it.
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  13. ADVDucs33

    ADVDucs33 Been here awhile

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    I took my TT for a little spin to and a dip into the creek near work today. Then I found a nice spot and popped my lunch out and ate it creek side. This is a great bike and bargain from CSC.

    Kick starting will work with a flat dead battery (done it after leaving key on once in '16), crack throttle, rotate the kicker to get just past TDC, then give it a full kick. Will light up easier. KIMG0415.JPG
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  14. Jay_In_Milpitas

    Jay_In_Milpitas Zero to sixty in February

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    That hints to me that the ignition works as a magneto. I had noticed on the wiring diagram the alternator stator appeared to have windings dedicated to ignition system alone.
  15. ADVDucs33

    ADVDucs33 Been here awhile

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    I'd agree. It will spark and run always, even when you wreck your wiring harness by accident (don't ask how) and sever the common ground in the harness that goes to the lights and horn and handlebars.... It will still run.
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  16. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    well crap. After that sentence, now I want to ask!

    Charles.
  17. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    Your TT250 looks exactly like mine. White with the orange TT lettering and the RX3 top case. With that top case I find the bike to be extremely utilitarian. When you are out running around doing errands it works perfect unless you buy something large or whatever.

    This morning I pulled the side cover for the battery and cut a piece of foam to sandwich in there so the battery does not vibrate and bounce around. I taped it into place with some electrical tape just in case it wants to fall out. I also did an inspection and aired up the tires. The rear one had lost about 10 PSI between now and 9 months ago but the front was down to 11 PSI from 36. I thought that was a bit excessive but I am not finding any leaks in the front tire. Whatever it is its damn slow and I am no seeing any imperfections in the front tire. Its possible the valve stem just needs to be tightened up a bit but maybe the front tube has some sort of teeny tiny leak?

    Also found a missing screw that helps hold the left wing on the gas tank on. I must have forgotten to tighten it when I did the valve check. Its awfully floppy with the screw missing. Any screw would work here but I am a sucker for little details so I ordered OEM screw and washer that goes here.

    Only other issue is a few years ago I upgraded to the digital dash that a person was selling a few years ago. Its basically the same unit that CSC now offers as standard. Its a nice upgrade for the older TT250's and much more accurate. When I took it out of storage the RPM gauge was a tad slow then would bounce to the higher number then when you slow down it was sort of slow to go back down. It uses a cheap crimp wire for the RPM measurement so I suspect a connection issue. I seated the connection again and put some dielectric grease in there. Hopefully that solves it!
  18. ADVDucs33

    ADVDucs33 Been here awhile

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    Chopper-
    Well I was exploring the woods and fields near a rr grade and bam!!! caught a tie on a diagonal and dumped her down fast like a fire drill. a branch or something tugged the wiring hard by the steering neck as it was down...

    Longhaul, the top case will hold large things too, I carry a 10' strap for such occasions. This was on the way home, wife texted that we were out of dog food, no problem.

    28374.jpeg
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  19. ADVDucs33

    ADVDucs33 Been here awhile

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    It may be a slow thread, about a now old news bike. For those that have one, or are thinking of getting one I'll keep posting how mine is doing. It's August now, 4 years in and still happy. I changed down to a 45t rear sprocket and it may have been too far, great on the road with lower revs at 60, but big hills, or when on the trail its not as grunty.

    This was a few weeks ago, but past 6k while on a tiny seasonal path/road going to a friends.
    KIMG0484.JPG
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  20. Jay_In_Milpitas

    Jay_In_Milpitas Zero to sixty in February

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    By all means, keep posting. Until some better thread comes along, this is a good archive for the TT.
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