Cuatro Abuelos y un Pata de Perro Visitan Algunas Ciudades Coloniales Mexicanas

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by cwc, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    24 November Wednesday 2010

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    The Dog of the day.

    The guests at the hostel were from all over the world, and it made for great conversations on the roof top veranda. Lots of travel tips were exchanged there. Sara a Kiwi transplant to Ireland, went with Charlie and myself on the tour of the El Eden gold and silver mine that sets on top of the city. It made for a fun afternoon as we walked the neighborhoods of Zacatecas. The mine was started well before the invention of dynamite, and much of it was chiseled by hand. It is amazing how much hard rock ore can be chiseled out, and carried in baskets on the backs of indigenous slave labor. The mine goes to depths of 300 meters below the surface, children were also used as miners as they could fit into smaller areas. On average they would get 4 grams of gold and 6 to 10 grams of silver per ton from the ore pulled from the mine. Now don’t forget to build a big church and gild much of it’s interior, to keep that path to heaven open. Our guide spoke English for the tour as we 3 were the only ones on this tour. The cost for the tour was 80 pesos for adults and 40 pesos for ninos. Charlie and I each paid 40, which seemed to be fine with the ticket agent.

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    Mina supplied ATGATT

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    Our tourguide spoke English but not Kiwi. When Sara asked a question Dean or I had to translate.

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    If a father was killed and owed money to the "company store" his children had to work off the debt.

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    This mine was huge. We only saw a part of it.

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    Early day elevator operators

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    The elevator in action

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    Ore processing mill

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    Cerro de la Bufa, the mountain that overlooks Zacatecas.

    After the tour we did some more walking about in town. As in Guanajuato here is a lot of stuff to see there so we will probably have to go back.

    Tomorrow we go east until we find more mountains then head north.
    #41
  2. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    25 November Thursday 2010

    We left Zacatecas about 10AM on the loop road out of town, along the base of Mount Bufa. Next time in town we will need to ride the cable car up to Bufa, it was being repaired this time. We headed east on Mexico 49, through some of the lushest Joshua Trees and Prickly Pear Cactus I have ever seen. Joshua Tree National Park in California would blush with envy at the size and lushness of these plants. Several of the small villages we pass by are almost completely hidden by the Prickly Pear Cactus and the Joshua Trees. We take the northern loop road around San Luis Potosi, a dirty, rough, stinky, choked with trucks, route that serves the industrial area on the north side of town.
    Once we clear San Luis Potosi heading east on Hwy 70 the road is a dream to ride, smooth curves, deep dense forests, mountain traverses, great scenery in every direction.
    Just east of Rayon we turn north on a rough twisty narrow tar road up to Ciudad del Maiz, where we chat with the local police who want to talk motorcycles, and then lead us to the best hotel in town, the Bougainvillea. At $10.US each per night it was substandard to similarly priced accommodations. We covered 270 miles for the day.

    On our way out the door of the hostel Ernesto wished us Happy Thanksgiving. He 'fessed up that he had no idea what it all meant, but had seen it on his computer that morning. We gave him a quick tutorial on the holiday and he gave us a quick tutorial on the best way to get out of town.

    The casual reader may not notice it, but a careful reading of Dean's notes reveals that he really doesn't like the north bypass for SLP. Probably next time we could just go into town and see what it is like.

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    Our route for the next two days.

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    The dog of the day.

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    The latest recipient of one of Dean's balloons bids us farewell.


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    This scenic spot is east of SLP in a nice twisty section.

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    We stopped for gas and lunch near Rioverde. We'll eat better tomorrow.

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    While Dean was getting these Ciudad del Maiz señoritas posed I explained to them in Spanish that Dean was my grandfather and that he was 100 years old and therefore no danger to them. They believed me.:evil

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    These young guys had closed a street to make a volleyball court.

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    This sign doesn't say what some creative thinkers might think it says.

    Tomorrow we will get to ride some gravel.
    #42
  3. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    26 November Friday 2010

    A luke warm shower this morning would have been nice, but not to be at the Hotel Bougainvillea, cold water really wakes one up for the day. As we head west leaving town we come to a huge modern sculpture stainless steel entrance arch to Cuidad del Maiz, apparently somebody thought the town needed something positive to be remembered for. As the town is not a colonial period town it is little more than a service center for the surrounding population. Good two lane roads for the most part of the day, with great twisties. About 40 miles of dirt and gravel between Bustamante and Mier y Noriega was a fun change of pace, taking us through mountain terrain and obscure villages. Along that route were some huge red tip barrel cactus, as tall and as big around as me. Giant Agave plants with new seed stalks 15 to 20 feet tall reaching for the sky, with several shades of green , appear strangely alien. Sleek and colorful Cara-Cara rapidly glide past in search of carrion.
    Rare downdraft clouds race down the face of the mountains as we near Galeana, The cold head wind has dropped the temperature at least 30 degrees F, so we stop and put on most all of our cold weather gear, and continue to climb in elevation. We have covered 253 miles when we reach Galeana. Hotel Jardin gives us extra blankets for the night.

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    The dog of the day.

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    Cd. Del Maiz Arch

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    The road to Bustamante

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    We stopped to ask this man about the smoke up on the mountain, but I was unable to understand his very detailed answer.

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    Finally, real food in Bustamante.

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    We asked this young man for directions and he told us to turn north. Just then a truck came along and the driver said west. West agreed with the GPS más o menos so we went west.

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    The road was not all straight, but the photographer was too busy to take photos in the good parts.

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    The Tourist Information Bureau.

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    We were stopped for a little pathfinding when our truck driver friends came along, hopped out and drew us a map of all the turns.

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    More unpaved roads tomorrow.
    #43
  4. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    27 November Saturday 2010

    We leave Galeana by a route Charlie calls the Dual Sport Dragon, and this mountain shelf road lives up to its name with tight hairpins, steep inclines and first gear drops. We take this mostly one lane dirt road past remote villages through areas of primitive farming. In one village I hand out balloons to about a half dozen kids who approach from both sides of the dirt track, their homes are rough adobe or coarse block with low roofs that are leaking smoke from the cooking fires inside, the floors are dirt, the kids in little more than rags are all smiles, and quick with “Gracias”. As I get back on the bike feeling quite full of myself for having brought smiles to kids with balloons, I turn to look at 3 of the boys up to my left and one of them is taking my picture with a flip phone, no kidding. Go figure; living in a dirt house, dad rides a donkey, chickens running in and out, yet there it is a cell phone. After about 40 miles the dirt road pours out into a broad valley of corn fields and pastures, soon we are on little more than two dirt tracks with bunch grass and weeds growing between them, we meet a young boy on a John Deere tractor with his two dogs, he flashes a big smile. In about 4 or 5 miles we enter a large farm yard/village and pass through an open gate, then we are on a newer tar road, Charlie does wonders with his G P S. In a few miles we hit the mandatory cuota or toll road $3.US gets us over to Mexico 57 and it’s high speed north through Monclova. Was that a Lear Jet Factory next to the airport control tower? We motor into Sabinas around 5PM, we take the 4th hotel we check out. The Gran Hotel, at $20.US each including a cooked to order breakfast, and secure parking made for a comfy last night in Mexico. Charlie and a clerk in a Ropa (clothing) store helped to narrow the field of “Gus” hats I was trying on, plus Charlie was nice enough to carry it back to Texas on his bike as it is suited better for carrying a cowboy hat. 279 miles for the day.


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    The dog of the day.


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    The kids that took Dean's picture.

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    There's a burro in there somewhere.

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    There is actually a good gravel road that ends up the same place as this one, but this looked more interesting.

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    After Saltillo we were getting hungry, but there was no place to eat for miles. We ended up at this place for gorditas and it was OK. That means nobody got sick.[​IMG]

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    Like Dean said, this was the fourth place we looked at. The first, recommended by Sjoerd Bakker didn't have room for us, the second reminded me to much of Cd. del Maiz and only had street parking and the third was full.

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    Tomorrow we ride out of Mexico.
    #44
  5. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    28 November Sunday 2010

    After a tasty and filling breakfast we ride north for the border, stopping in Allende we turn in the vehicle permits, and get our receipts for the same. The actual border crossing at Piedras Negros / Eagle Pass TX went smoothly and we were soon eating a hamburger and French fries, the first we have had in 3 weeks. We leave Eagle Pass on Hwy 57 north, and hop on FM 481 up to Uvalde TX, and there catch Hwy 83 north to East on Hwy 39 and over to Ingram. The late afternoon sun lit up the beautiful scenery of Texas Hill Country, what a wonderful last stretch of road to end our central Mexico trip.

    The odometer on my DR 650 says 3,063 miles for the trip from Ingram TX down through our central Mexico loop and back to Ingram. Charlie will have different miles from his G P S, plus he is riding his DR 650 north to Pryor OK, before loading it up to haul it back to Minnesota. Charlie’s, Arturo’s and my DR are all pretty much identical as two are 08s and I think Arturo’s is an 09, but for some reason mine consistently got about 5 miles to the gallon better mileage. Charlie thinks it is because I have a larger windshield to help smooth the air flow past the bike. Whatever the case it is a thrifty machine at 54 to over 62 miles per gallon for the trip. This is all crunched out with a calculator to the hundredth of a gallon and tenth of the mile.

    272 miles for the day.


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    The dogs of the day.

    Thanks to Tricepilot for telling us to return our vehicle permits at Allende. We would have been pretty upset if we had ridden by it. BTW check his thread on Oaxaca at http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=641360

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    The most interesting thing at the aduana.

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    Back in the USA

    We got back to Ingram in time to install the windshield I had in Dean's trailer and eat leftover turkey and dressing for supper. It was way better than the bean burritos we had for Thanksgiving Dinner back in Rioverde.

    29 November Monday 2010

    After a good nights sleep at Marv and Betty’s Charlie packs up his DR and heads north for the drive up to Pryor OK where he will load the bike up and head home to Minnesota.

    I’m settling in for a winter in the sunbelt. :evil

    Hope this report spurs you to go out and explore.

    +1

    #45
  6. zookster

    zookster Chupacabra

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    Great RR! Appears it was quite a trip and loads of fun + good times.
    #46
  7. ficoszac

    ficoszac y...ahora???

    Joined:
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    here a federico`s picture!!!!!
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    #47
  8. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    Thanks for posting that. My photographer has been chastised.
    #48
  9. farrell caesar

    farrell caesar Seezer

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    Enjoyed the report guys. I have an 05 Dr with flat slide, needle all the way down. Gets 45 mpg. Have not changed the pilot yet.
    #49
  10. TallRob

    TallRob Long timer

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    that funky yellow machine is a tree shaker. Usually for walnuts and things like that. Shake the tree and the nuts fall off. Kinda like if I were to ride a KLR thru a rutted dirt road. Mine would fall off too.
    #50
  11. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

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    I've got the same picture of that road damage coming from the other way here:lol3:
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    Here was that paved road cut from down below, this was a fun section:
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    That really was some great country riding out in that area and good paved curvy climb for me, and down for you. Looks like you had a great time and Xilita for the next time for sure, one of my favorite touristy stops:deal

    Here's some more I had:
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    Can't believe you took me to eat with you guys looking like this:lol3
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    Dos Amigos
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    I guess I was still at sea when you guys posted this one up. Thanks for sharing Charlie. That R Del C looks good, I skipped it because it was a weekend but I will be back in that area for sure before too long:deal
    #51
  12. Stuffyyff

    Stuffyyff Adventurer

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    That's a mighty cool trailer. Even has it's own fireplace. Wouldn't it be more fuel efficient if you built the chimney out of something lighter than stone and made the chimney more aero dynamic? :rofl
    #52
  13. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

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    ^^^Looks like they don't like mowing yards too:lol3
    #53
  14. Stuffyyff

    Stuffyyff Adventurer

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    Hey Throttlemeister, quick question if you would, please. What tank do you have on that six fitty? Looks nice. Maybe TT?
    #54
  15. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

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    Your right Stuffy, I put some big tanks from TT on there, I thought I was crazy but now I couldn't be more happier with the fuel setup after modifying it a little. It works perfect for what I'm doing down here.
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    Sorry for the highjack Charlie:D
    #55