CX500 Scrambler/Desert Sled Build

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by gearheadE30, Jun 27, 2019.

  1. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Lots of progress! Got a solid few days of work in over the 4th of July holiday and was actually able to ride it around the neighborhood! It's all coming back apart again now so I can make a wiring harness, mounts for the lights and such, and finish off some detail stuff before painting the frame. The exhaust, while probably not the best for performance, sounds great and surprisingly is not too loud. Carbs obviously need some jetting work. I have yet to find a good explanation for why the stock carbs have a primary and secondary main jet, which makes it harder to deal with tuning. I will probably start with the ubiquitous 90/120 recommendation and see where it puts me, but if anyone has an explanation of the carbs I'd love to hear it.

    Side note: while the spring rates are about right on the snowmobile shocks....the damping is really stiff. At least at 10 mph it is stiff. Remains to be seen what happens when speed and hard impacts are added to the mix.
    [​IMG]
    #21
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  2. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Among many other things, I finally had time to go through the carbs. I did raise the needles 2mm using some shims made of a cast off section of brake line. One of my sets of carbs had 120/90 mains in them already, so I am going to give those a try before I buy the smaller mains that I probably need. The slide springs were not even close to the same length so I did some stretching to match them. Not ideal, but better than one spring a half inch longer than the other I imagine. Cleaned everything out, disabled the ACVs, set the float heights, etc. I will sync them when they're back on the bike and then see what else I need to do with them.

    I did get 4 or 5 miles of gentle road testing in using a different set of carbs just to make sure everything worked, engine ran okay, battery charged, etc. before finalizing paint and sheathing the new wiring harness. So far so good! I did also add a Shingenden SH775 series regulator rectifier to try to save my stator and keep oil temps down as well. It's lean, as expected, so I kept it to low revs and small throttle openings. Electric fan, switch, and relay setup seems to work well, too. Pretty happy so far!

    Wiring harness is also done, and I finished up the battery box, ingitech mount, and all the other little tabs and brackets so was finally able to paint the frame.

    In my effort to make good time, I neglected to take many pictures, but will get more during final assembly.

    ------

    Got final assembly done enough to fully warm the bike up, then take it for a ~5 mile ride. Really, really stoked with how it rides, but the jetting, as expected, is too rich up top. 7000+ rpm will not pull at all past about half throttle, which is still high enough airflow that you're off the needles into the mains I would imagine. Idle acceptable (carbs still need to be synced as I just bench synced them) and "normal" riding feels great if a bit on the rich side. 90/120 mains in it right now. Earlier suggestion was 85/118 - if it's so rich as to essentially not run at WOT, does the collective think that's enough of a step down? I'm not opposed to buying a small selection of jets, but not sure how big of a selection that might mean I need depending on these carbs' sensitivity.

    Although my exhaust is about as far from equal length, I am happy to say that both cylinders seem to behave similarly - I'm not getting one cylinder cutting out notably before the other at WOT. Hopefully that just means one carb might be one step leaner or richer than the other rather than anything more complex. Final plug chops will eventually tell that story.
    #22
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  3. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Lots of mundane stuff done like installing the working tach, replacing blown gauge backlight bulbs, and that kind of thing. Making all of the frame tabs was honestly one of the more time consuming parts of all this. Because I cut off the back half of the frame, I needed a place to mount lights, the ignition module, battery, starter relay, rear brake switch, and regulator rectifier. Additionally, the stock wiring harness didn't even come close to fitting as everything was either too long or too short. While the bike came with an electric fan installed, it was done pretty poorly. There was a thermo switch epoxied to the bottom of the radiator, a relay zip tied to one of the breather hoses, and a complete mess of wiring getting power to everything. Not good. Eventually, I was confident I had everything, and decided it was time to paint. There were a bunch of parts hanging around the back yard, but only got one pic and it was just of the bike.

    [​IMG]

    While paint was drying, I did a quick carb clean and partial rebuild. As I mentioned, one set of carbs had 90/120 jets so I installed those, shimmed the needles with a short, carefully-measured section of brake hard line, disabled the ACV valves, set float heights, set slide spring lengths, and just generally cleaned everything and made sure it was all in good shape.

    [​IMG]

    ACV-disabling section of an old oring I had lying around:

    [​IMG]


    The next day, the paint was more or less fully dry so I started cleaning and reassembling other parts. You can see the trimmed center stand mounts and rear frame structure pretty well here. I did grease the swing arm bearings while I was in there, as they were in good shape and didn't merit replacement. Also note that I added a second tab to the frame backbone for the regulator rectifier mount. And please ignore that the pegs are on backwards...realized it right after I took the picture and forgot to take another haha. You can kind of see the rear brake switch tab on the bar that the muffler mounts to as well.

    [​IMG]

    Rear frame made of the center stand, along with the rear fender mounts, battery box, and other bits. Got everything pretty square...except the bottom of the battery box somehow. The battery sits square in it with no problem, just got that plate cocked somehow and didn't notice until after it was painted. It's funny how multi-colored metal bits can hide flaws that pop out when everything is a uniform color.

    Starter solenoid got tucked up and out of the way under the front of the seat mount. The painted bolt is on there to keep paint off the bare metal, as that is the frame common ground point. Ignitech mounted (it has felt pads isolating it somewhat, and the mount has positive stops built in in addition to the zip ties), and another view of the battery box. You can also see the regulator rectifier down there. It's a Shindengen SH775 series unit that should help keep the stator alive. If you're not familiar with the differences between resistive shunting, MOSFET/SCR shunting, and series regulation, it's interesting to read up on, but the key takeaway is the only way to keep the stator from running at full output (and heat) all the time is to get a series regulator rectifier. Folding shifter tip also makes an appearance here. Not sure how it will hold up, but I bed-lined it for a grippier coating.

    [​IMG]

    Front to back, you can (barely) see the electric fan relay mounted to the front engine mount wishbone, LED flasher relay mounted to the upper engine mount plates, and all the harness connectors tucked between the plates. They all route to the right side of the bike, so plenty of room for throttle and choke cables. Wiring for the regulator rectifier and rear brake switch run down the frame backbone, and everything else goes under the seat. Nothing too crazy, but there is a lot of time shown in this picture routing wires, removing excess lengths, and trying to figure out where all the components would fit without interfering with other stuff.

    [​IMG]


    Speaking of the fan, here's the switch:

    [​IMG]

    Then I went for a ride, and it got dark, so I only got one picture all put together. I'm going to use the ratty red tank once I clean it out, but have been using a "nice" tank for testing. Yeah, the seat isn't my best work, but it does the job for now. I did add a rear fender extension to keep the air filters as clean as possible. The rear brake lever will get modified so it doesn't hang down so low, but it's fine for now. Obviously the front wheel and tire aren't done yet, but this was good enough to ride on. Only issues found so far are that the bike is too rich once it gets into the main jets, and the final drive gets a bit warm so I really need to check and change the oil in that before I ride any more. I did also have the universal joint fall off about 50 feet from my house....I thought the retainer bolt was in the groove but it must have been just past the end of the shaft, and somehow felt solid enough that it didn't pull off when I checked it. No harm, no foul, and lesson learned!

    Other work to come is fork swap, front fender, radiator guard, skid plate, front lighting setup, and a few other little things, but it's getting much closer to a final product! For now, my modified-ish stock forks are okay to ride on, but are far from ideal. The spring rate feels good with all the cutting/preload, but they sit too high in their travel and so have no droop travel on the road. Not great, and the clanging is horrible when they top out. 30wt fork oil is also too soft. It has been a long time since I've had damping rod forks, and....well, they aren't great. Front brake needs work, too. It's mostly just a suggestion at slowing down. It's fun to ride though, and the sound is addictive!

    [​IMG]
    #23
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  4. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    A bunch of jets are in the mail, but not here yet. I also discovered my clutch was slipping...because the previous owner had been in there and didn't tighten the pressure plate bolts, so they were all backing out!! I'm slightly terrified of what else he might have touched in there...

    On the good news side, I have a video! Did the deck test to see how it would do. Passed with flying colors! Rear shocks are a little stiff though...

    #24
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  5. Nudie

    Nudie Rusty not rusty

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    EEAB2CE6-4357-4394-9B5F-927F81C2F718.jpeg I love what you’ve done. Brilliant build report too.
    Makes my GS500 build look a bit average.....
    #25
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  6. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Back in the late '80s, I had a 1981 GL500 (same engine) completely stock, full dress, fairing, bags, trunk, and dual seat. It sounded like it was going to fly apart at highway speeds. The carbs are a bit strange, and mine had a bad oil leak around where the fan shaft came through the engine block. I finally fixed that, it took about 2 days. I put about 20,000 miles on that bike, and it had 37,000 on it when I bought it. Other than the oil leak I never had any serious problems. The CX/GL500/650 engine is one of my favorite Honda engines ever. I don't know why they didn't use it longer. I love the job you did on that bike. I first saw it in the scooter post. Due to my age and some disabilities, I am looking to build a dirt road and light trail bike out of a street bike. Ground clearance is not really an issue, a low seat is more important. I can no longer get on a dual sport bike without standing on something. Tubeless tires are also important, even if I have to use street tires. I have had a LOT of flat tires while riding a dual sport off road. I am no longer physically able to repair a flat on a tube type tire out in the middle of the desert. I can still do it easily at home, and might be able to do it beside the road/trail, but it is not something I want to try. Get stuck in the middle of the AZ desert and you are buzzard food.
    #26
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  7. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    @Nudie the GS looks great! Those are solid bikes, but considering my build had a $1000 budget, I couldn't find any cheap enough. The GS500 and EX500 were both on the list as well.

    @JerryH yeah, the CX500s have very short gearing. The 650 engine had a different primary drive that pulls highway revs down by 700 rpm or so, and mine has a larger-than-stock 17" rear wheel that helps a surprising amount. The 16" wheel that was all the rage at the time was rough, though. The CX makes a pretty good dual sport, especially since the engine is so durable. The massive flywheel makes it a really easy bike to ride, too, and shaft drive has its benefits when it comes to noise and maintenance. The Ninja 250 and 500 that came on the trip were both much easier to make dirt-ready though.
    #27
  8. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Not a lot of pictures, since I've mostly been focused on an issue where the bike won't rev past 7000 rpm. I originally thought it was rich based on my rather more restrictive setup than some of the others out there, but after more diagnosis, that doesn't seem to be the case. 90/120 jets with 1mm needle lift right now. Tried 90/115 and it got a lot worse. Tried 90/120 with 2mm needle lift and it was better up top but too rich below that. I've gone through the carbs twice now and everything looks great. Is it possible that I need something like an 85/130 setup to get it to run properly up there? I've not seen a lot of people doing something like that, but I'm all out of things to try except buying more jets.

    It will rev out to redline with the choke pulled. So one way or another I am not getting enough fuel. Maybe the foam filters are less restrictive than I thought? Vacuum on the engine side of the venturi should be unchanged, but there would now be reduced vacuum at the inlet/reference ports...maybe the slides are opening more for a given throttle position than before or something? I know just enough to be dangerous but not enough to actually figure anything out without trial and error, haha.

    By the way, I did check the ignition system as well, and accidentally reset my ignitech in the process. All fixed now, all the settings are correct, coils in good shape, and plugs are new. Rev limiter is at 9800 and it seems to read rpm accurately so I don't think that's the issue, especially since I can get there with the choke pulled.

    -----eventual fix-----
    The gist of it is that my carbs seem to be functioning properly and check out in every way I can verify...except that I need to run a much larger secondary main than is reasonable. I don't have a good explanation for it, but I've now got acceptable performance with 85/135 jets, stock float height, deleted ACVs, needles shimmed 2mm, and 3 turns of slide spring cut off. I don't suggest anyone try cutting their slide springs as I think this is probably unique to my situation, but I have a spare set of carbs so the risk was low. It helped some at the top end, but the best part was filling in the hole in the torque curve between 5000 and 7000 rpm. It acts like it wants less primary main and more secondary main....so I guess I will try that as I continue searching for the problem. I'm getting really good at removing those float bowls with the carbs on the bike...

    It's kind of a silly setup that I don't have an explanation for, but so far everything else is checking out and the bike is responding predictably to modifications and jetting. If I hadn't compared numbers on the forum, I would not have any reason to think it wasn't working right and would just think I hadn't nailed the jetting yet. More to come as I keep investigating.

    For reference, my idle vacuum is around 8 inches of mercury at 1200 rpm idle. It took me forever to find reference to this when searching, and it's not in the manual (just that the tolerance between carbs is 1.6 inHg) so this may help someone in the future.

    In other news, I cut down the radiator guard so that it clips in and put some plastic hardware I had lying around in the holes.

    [​IMG]

    I've also been working on my fork conversion, getting everything preemptively prepped to bolt on. Forks are a pair of somewhat rare 1997 RM250 closed-chamber Showa 49mm conventionals, which externally look like DRZ400 forks but internally are much more sophisticated. These appeared to still have the original fluid in both the inner and outer chambers. I shortened the forks by 4.5 inches and installed 0.58 kg/mm fork springs that were originally part of a lowering kit for a KTM 950 Adventure. Valving was left alone, but I used 10wt oil instead of 5wt to (very) roughly compensate for the stiffer springs. I also had a bunch of half empty bottles of 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 wt oil left over from other projects so mixing them all together served to free up a large amount of space in the flammables cabinet. 5mm free space in the cartridge and 190mm air chamber in the fork tube. May not matter to anyone here, but there is nearly no information about these forks online, so probably worth putting out there. Yeah, these forks are complete overkill for this project, but they were local at an almost too good to be true price.

    [​IMG]

    Original vs. shortened:

    [​IMG]

    No pics yet, but I also finished painting the front wheel and license plate mount. Depending on when the last of the parts show up, I will probably start the fork conversion and rewiring project in the next day or two so I can be done riding the thing around with a big old bundle of wires just zip tied to the forks and an LED cobbled on there as a headlight.
    #28
  9. Nudie

    Nudie Rusty not rusty

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    It started as a $500 accident victim, but the budget stretched a bit further than yours after that.
    #29
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  10. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Both my intake and exhaust are goofy, and the exhaust in particular is definitely not optimal for power, so I've been moving forward with jetting under the assumption that my carbs are working right and it's the unique boundary conditions causing all the head scratching.

    My setup is currently stock float height, needles shimmed 2mm, 3 coils off of the slide springs, 75 primary mains, 148 left secondary main, 150 right secondary main. The offset jetting helps match the plug coloring at WOT due to my strange exhaust. I may have overdone the slide spring cutting because I either have some slide bounce or a lean transient condition below 4000 rpm that I need to investigate more. WOT acceleration is strong from 4500 rpm redline with no dips or holes in power delivery. I still need to do another round of WOT plug reading to verify AFR, and this time around will also check cruise and tip-in conditions since I have a bit of a burble to resolve in some conditions. It's getting close.

    Fork swap is also making progress on the bench - bearing spacers are all made up and ready and the CX front wheel is mounted to the RM forks. I'm about 50% of the way through making a caliper mount adapter. For now I'm using stock CX front brake, but will eventually move to a more modern, more powerful brake. I *might* be ready to start mounting this up on the bike tonight.

    License plate is mounted and the red tank is de-rusted. I don't really care for swingarm mounted plates, but there isn't really another place to put it on this bike. The fender doesn't have enough angle to make it visible, and there is a rack that goes behind the seat that prevents it from tucking in there. This is tucked out of the way as much as possible, though I expect it might get a bit mangled if the bike slides on its side through the dirt for any real distance.

    [​IMG]


    I used a 50/50 mix of CLR and water on the tank, with regular sloshing. The rust particles inside actually worked really well as an abrasive. I think I've gotten lucky and don't have any holes! The water that came out at the end was pretty disgusting. The tank is currently coated with WD40. I'm going to run it as is for a while since I'm on a bit of a time crunch with the build, but may eventually coat with POR-15.

    [​IMG]


    I did also get some video of one of my jetting test runs. I tried to catch a passable variety of cruise rpms, acceleration and throttle positions, rev matching downshifts at different rpms, and one rather over-exuberant acceleration run when I realized it was actually running really well and got excited. Engine is fully warmed up at the start of the video, and yeah I know the brakes squeak like crazy.
    #30
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  11. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    I broke out the angle grinder and made a caliper bracket. Stock caliper and such for now, but will eventually update with something lighter and more modern. Honda obviously didn't pay much attention to unsprung weight. I am also using a 13mm master cylinder instead of the stock 14mm to try to get a little bit more brake power out of it, as it is a pretty abysmal, wooden setup even with new pads and lubed slides. Yep, I know it's a mess. It was about 1 in the morning when I took that picture, and my standards for keeping a tidy shop had dropped precipitously a few hours earlier.

    [​IMG]

    The fork swap is definitely not for the faint of heart...getting the bearing stackup to fit was a challenge, and I had to make a custom upper bearing seal and cup. out of some other bits I had lying around. Of course the steering lock tabs got cut off, and new steering stops were made. I ended up having to move the tank back 1.25 inches or so, as you can see in the pictures. I measured the steering angle, but unfortunately didn't measure it stock so no idea how it compares. It's better than my 950 adventure by 4 degrees each way, and worse than my FC450 by around the same amount.

    [​IMG]

    Of course, the seat doesn't fit with the tank pushed back. Everything else clears, though.

    [​IMG]

    Not a lot of other picture worthy stuff. Working on cleaning out the wiring harness as there is a bunch of stuff I don't need and I can't use the stock fuse box anymore. I have added a 4-fuse panel under the tank for the master fuse, a fan fuse, and a switched power fuse. I have also moved the switched power supply to a relay instead of pushing it all through the key switch itself. I did also manage to make a new seat, which is much less lumpy and giant than the first one I built. Padding is a $10 Walmart camping pad instead of a bunch of cut up old sections of seat foam. Much firmer, and much more comfortable. Well, in the garage at least. It also lets me sit up a bit higher, which is important because I am tall and CXs are tiny bikes. Low seats are uncomfortable. Yeah, wiring harness is still in process here.

    [​IMG]

    Skid plate mounts are also done, and the skid plate frame is done. Lots of work into that, and still not 100% sure how effective it will be. Starting final assembly of the front end tonight, with any luck.
    #31
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  12. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    The forks are 1998 RM250 forks shortened 4 inches. They look externally like DRZ400 forks, but are twin chamber and of course set up much more aggressively than the DRZ. I've further updated them with a set of 0.58 springs from a 950 Adventure for the weight of the CX.

    I did actually ride the CX to work after a thrash on it last night. Front caliper seized on me, so I got it freed up on the side of the road and am just riding carefully with the rear until I can get home. I will have to pull the other caliper off of the set of stock forks I was riding around with before since I know its good. Wiring is mostly done but have intermittent power to the gauge for some reason and still need to update the Ingitech with the shift light settings. Quick turn throttle makes a huge difference on the bike! The sidestand is also far too short so I had to prop it up with some cardboard when I got to work. Lots of detail stuff that I need to do to make it look okay, and still no turn signals on the front. Bike is happily charging at 14.3 volts even with the fan on, and goes down the road right at 180F coolant temp.

    [​IMG]
    #32
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  13. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Front brake is fixed, along with a variety of other little detail things. I still can't lock it with one finger, but it feels much better than stock and can lock the front no problem with both fingers. Just about right for off road stuff, and honestly better than I was expecting considering how poorly people think of these calipers. No current pictures, but I did also install new grips, a left side mirror, and some old plastic Acerbis hand guards I had lying around. I also added 2.5" to the side stand so it wouldn't fall over whenever I park it.

    The gasket on my gas cap had also failed. turns out you can make a new gasket out of the guts of an Acerbis large gas cap rather than buying a new old one and hoping it will be better than what you already have.

    Still need to make a mount for the front fender, make the rear luggage rack, finish the skidplate, and finish the front end number plate/wiring cover/turn signal mounts. A few things also still need to be painted.

    [​IMG]
    #33
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  14. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Got a chance to weigh it today - completely full tank of gas put me at 195 lbs on the front wheel and 220 on the rear for a total of 415. Looks like I'm going to miss my target of sub-400 lbs, but there is definitely still some low hanging fruit.

    Also, the skid plate works great!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #34
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  15. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Well, I took the CX off road for real for the first time yesterday now that it has a skidplate and a front fender. It's surprisingly good! And...surprisingly stiff. The 19 inch front wheel feels kind of strange when you are used to a 21, and the wider tire profile likes to try to climb out of deeper ruts rather than sitting in the bottom. However, the geometry feels pretty good, and you really have to jump it or slam into something to use all the suspension. Low speed sitting down is a little uncomfortable because of how stiff it is, but it really comes into its own when the speed goes up. I only jumped a few small things and got the clickers dialed in, but it's pretty hilarious to ride. Shockingly, I didn't seem to have any issues with float or slide bounce either, which is always a concern with CV carbs.

    I also wore the MX boots for the first time on the bike (A* Tech7), and I'm happy to report that they don't cause any strange ergonomic issues like they do on some other bikes. The seat is a little low for transitioning from sitting to standing, and the tank is so freaking long that you end up trying to clamp your knees on it, which takes some getting used to. I do also need to pull the rear brake lever up a little bit more because the shape of the tank and crash bars pushes my knee outwards when I try to get my legs leaned forward to attack a trail or obstacle. I can deal with legs back trials-style, but only if I can still get the brake.

    We had a harescramble locally last weekend, which I raced on the 450. The course is still burned in and fairly dry, so I took the CX out for a 6 mile lap. It survived! Only problem was the gas tank came loose. ~24 minute lap vs mid 18 minute race pace on the 450, but after one lap I was pretty tired. Temp never went above 195, and the clutch adjustment never moved!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #35
  16. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    (member murrayf over on the cx500 forums dropped some info over there for other people possibly interested on a similar build but a little easier route. Murray also makes a killer Mikuni VM34 conversion kit for these bikes, among other things.)

    the cx650c swing arm is wider so can take bigger tires

    it is almost 3 inches longer and it has a better drive shaft with better non binding ujoints so can be abused to higher angles (still wont last forever but it wont screw up)

    so you could have more swing arm travel

    if that would help the only issue will be is it commonly takes a 15 rear mag or i like to run the vt 800 shadow spoke rim

    so i guess you guys could put what ever hoop you want on the hub and get spoke that are longer

    if you run a cx650 front end it also has almost 4 inches more front end travel length and a larger single disc

    plus its a 39mm fork with a factory fork brace

    then put a 650 motor with few mods and a set of mikunis and 500 transmission swapped into it with a few gears mixed up in it

    so you have about 75 crank horsepower for the same weight but the lower 500 gearing so you have all that grunt kept where you need it

    ---------------------------------------- my response back --------------------------------------------------

    I didn't realize the 650 swing arm was so different. Based on internet numbers, it looks like a lot of that goes into wheelbase: CX500D is ~57.3" and CX650C is 59.6" which would make for a really long bike considering how low it is. But not terrible. The shock mounts on the swing arm side are in the same place relative to the rear axle on the 650, which would lay out the shocks a little when combined with a CX500 frame. If someone didn't want to go cutting up their frame like I did, that sounds like it would be a really good option.

    The other guy who has that older CX500 dual sport build thread used 14.5" TT500 shocks on a stock CX500 frame and swingarm. While that's pretty aggressive on the U joint, he didn't ever report any odd issues with it.

    I avoided (hopefully) drive shaft angle issues with my 15.5" shocks with the frame mods - the rear only sits maybe an inch and a half higher than stock, but has 1.5-2" more bump travel as well since the tire no longer hits the stock frame hoop. Still plenty of space under the skidplate at full compression.

    CX650C forks look like an interesting option from the travel and diameter. They're really about perfect for an easy swap there. The downside is the rake and trail numbers are huge, which might make for very lazy (but stable) handling. Not what I wanted, but definitely could be a great solution if someone is looking for that. Someone should try it and report back!

    I would love to do a 650 engine swap for a little more juice. The larger clutch is also a big plus. Honestly, the CX at 415 lbs with ~45 hp is better than I was expecting though. Unless a cheap running 650 pops up locally, it will probably stay a 500 and just work on losing more weight. A set of your mikunis on this bike would be pretty darn interesting though.
    #36
  17. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,118
    Location:
    Indiana
    Here are some clips from a lap of the local harescramble course on the CX500, with a short walkaround at the end. 18:45 average lap time on the FC450, 22.09 on the CX but I was beat at the end.

    #37
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  18. godwinmt

    godwinmt They call me Crash

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,841
    Location:
    Seymour, IN
    I was thoroughly impressed with it over the weekend! It took way more than it should have to catch up to you, and there was no way I was going to get by on the actual trail cleanly!
    #38
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  19. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,118
    Location:
    Indiana
    No way was I going to pound through that dip right after the turn, either - you ran away after that. I had the gopro on; your pass was pretty entertaining with that downhill off camber rut :lol3
    #39
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  20. godwinmt

    godwinmt They call me Crash

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,841
    Location:
    Seymour, IN
    If only you heard what the Sena did :lol3:lol3:lol3
    #40
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