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Cycle South 2020 / La segunda parte (stir crazy in Joinville Brazil during Covid-19 spread)

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ohio_Danimal, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,929
    Location:
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (The Crooked River)
    You’re right near me Ian! We crossed into Argentina today on an awesome dirt road (X-83) going through multiple Nacional Parques, first Reserva Nacional Tamango and then Parque Nacional Patagonia and then finally Reserva Nacional Lago Jeinemeni. Wild mountainscapes all around, a road that belongs in a Dakar race and little to no traffic. Plenty of snow-covered peaks and quite possible the worse washboard surface I’ve ridden in my life. At least during the long stretches when standing and trying to keep my teeth from rattling out of my skull, the speeds were slower and I could afford to sight-see rather than watching my line like a hawk.
    The border station in Argentina (10km down the road from Chile’s) is the most laid-back I’ve experienced. One friendly guard. No computadora. Just a few forms and a smile and a handshake. Then the road got worse as it became Argentina Ruta 41. We took that to a no-name dirt road that went due south direct to Rt 39 to Lago Posadas were we are now at a Hostal. Tomorrow we head east back to Ruta 40 and south towards Gobernador Gregores, where we’ll begin the detour around the bad section of Ruta 40 north of Tres Largos.
    And Sunny needs a break. Countless recent days of all-day-long beating on dirt and rock washboard roads. In fact I spotted the left fork leg seal leaking oil all over after today’s ride. Sucks.
    So after buying food for dinner, I disassembled the front fork brace and removed the front fender. Then cut the lower forks boots free, unclipped and removed the wiper and then took an empty 2L bottle of water and cut my own version of a “Seal Saver” and used it to (hopefully) clean out whatever dirt was trapped in the seal causing the leak. Early testing shows an improvement, so fingers are crossed. I’ll know for sure tomorrow as the roads aren’t getting any better any time soon.
    Oh and Sergio stayed another night in Cochrane hoping to also catch a spot on the sold out ferry from Yungay to Natales, along with Kurt. So today it was myself and Olaf, Sam and Mystery.
    I’ll try to get some of the camera’s pictures out soon. Back into Argentina again yay! And another currency again yay! And ATMs that don’t work yay! Lol. Luckily I had a good amount of Argentine Pesos still in my wallet.
    Now there’s a beer with my name of it of you’ll excuse me.
  2. Pete S

    Pete S Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2018
    Oddometer:
    148
    Location:
    Portland, ME
    Hi Dan,

    Thank you for all of the time you put into sharing your adventure with us. I've been enjoying following along since the beginning.

    One thing that I'm curious about, that isn't explained in much detail in most ride reports, is what you would typically eat and where you would get that food, over the span of several days in a given country. You and most most people post stuff related to eating that will be interesting to the people reading your ride report, whether it's a family feast you were invited to, a particularly good or bad meal somewhere, or eggs that you cooked and shared with some farmer in Peru. What I'm wondering about are the meals or snacks that you eat on a regular basis, that weren't worthy of being mentioned, not that you should add that to your daily ride report, but more like how someone would share an occasional review of their gear.

    When you cook up a couple eggs for breakfast, did you buy them from someone you passed yesterday selling eggs by the side of the road? Or do you buy half a dozen at a time and stash the rest in your panniers? For a midday meal, if there's not a street vendor selling tacos (or whatever the local fare is), are you cooking, eating stuff from a gas station, getting a few items from a local market you passed, or do you usually have a stash of say nuts and dried fruit to snack on? Along the lines of "if it wasn't just peeled or cooked, don't eat it", what countries south of the U.S. is there almost no concern over say non-potable water being used in food prep, or is much of that a judgement call based on where you happen to be stopped to eat?

    I've got another 24 days of work before I'm a free man. I can't wait to be on the road.

    Pete
  3. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,929
    Location:
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (The Crooked River)
    Hey Pete. Tick tock tick tock lol.

    great question about food. I’ll answer simply based upon what I do, now that I’ve been on the road so long. I’ll be blunt (am I ever any other way?)
    Breakfast:
    I like to have yogurt a few times a week. It’s available most everywhere in CA and SA, quality varies greatly but it’s the probiotics I want. Greek style can be had. Yogurt and coffee and I feel the urge. And being regular is vital to me. Fruit nearly daily. Usually bananas. Available all over in varied guises lol. Fiber. So some bread. Lot of Hostals serve “breakfast” which is normally toast and spreads, fruits and coffee and maybe juice. That’s fine. Sometimes they offer eggs. Even better.
    Eggs are sold at nearly every store in every city. Less than a dozen and they give them to you in a baggie. Just use them. Extras? Hard boil them. They’ll keep for several days in your tank bag and be great with salt.
    Lunch?
    Prepared I like Empenadas. They are nearly everywhere. Cheap. Filling. And keep well in the tank bag. (See a pattern like?)
    Of course some areas have street food everywhere in towns, small or large. But less and less the further south you go. When eating street food no matter where, try to get from a popular stand where you need to wait a bit. Fresher.
    Never eat fresas y crema. It’s all over some areas. Don’t trust the cream.
    Road lunch that I prepare?
    In my top case is almost always:
    Canned tuna (available everywhere)
    Loaf of bread or some type of bread
    Big squeeze pouch of mayo
    Salt/pepper
    Spaghetti
    Bag of sauce
    Ketchup/Mostaza
    A few ramen noodle packs
    3-4 packs of soup /lentils mix
    With the above a great lunch can be made quickly. You can also carry jamon/queso, but make sure to not leave it stored long.
    Dinner? It’s a toss up. How late is it? Are restaurants open? (For instance in Argentina some restaurants don’t open till 9pm!) How expensive are they? Does it leave budget money for beer/wine/weed etc lol? These are critical decisions one makes daily!
    Sometimes like tonight, dinner is a repeat of lunch (asst sandwich combos we make as nothing is open but a small supermercado).
    No matter where I am, I carry a few liters of bottled water too.
    Lately have eaten a large amount of chocolate. I know it’s bad. But it’s soooo good and sometimes cheap!
    Usually if all I want is a snack, a few cookies and a banana will suffice.

    The same food pack will work for last minute camping as well. If you are planning ahead to camp, simply buy some raw meat and veggies and go to town at camp. Cooked meat and steamed veggies tossed together with some good spices. Yum!

    now I’m hungry again!
    td63, YLBiker, chilolac and 8 others like this.
  4. Ian.H

    Ian.H Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    Poland
    Hi Dan. I am driving down to Gobernador Gregores tomorrow and staying there for the night. On Sunday I will also be taking the 'alternative' route to Tres lagos. Spoke to a couple of biker groups today that were heading north and they all said the routa 40 run down to Tres lagos was bad with lots of fallers.

    If we meet up in Gobernador Gregores I have a proper seal cleaning tool in my kit.
  5. Pete S

    Pete S Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2018
    Oddometer:
    148
    Location:
    Portland, ME
    Thank you for the excellent response Dan!

    Yeah, I've been smiling more, knowing that I have a new chapter of my life awaiting me.
    drhippie2, ScotsFire and Ohio_Danimal like this.
  6. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2009
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    Sounds like we should be able to meet. It’ll be a long day for us (298 km, 5-3/4 hrs nom. ) but doable.
    If you’re on WhatsApp PM me your number and we can communicate that way. I’m still recharging a Peru SIM card in my iPhone!
  7. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Today heavy rain woke me at 7am. Thoughts of an early departure faded as quickly as my consciousness, as the rain on the hostel roof quickly lulled me back to sleep.
    The sound of a Peruvian rider’s KLR leaving around 9 again stirred me. But yet again rain began and I was out.
    Just after 10 Olaf and I arose and began packing. The Google maps route to Gobernador Gregores showed close to 6 hours and we needed to get going.
    Leaving town on Rt 39 headed East, the road was broken rock and loose gravel (again) but with fairly well-defined clear tracks to follow and the winds not enough at first to cause deviation to the point of gravel immersion lol.
    Finally we arrived at Ruta 40 which was paved. Yay! Pavement! We stopped to gear up more as the temps were dropping and rain was visible in the horizon.
    Now raining and colder, the Gerbings jacket liner was turned up, heated grips on 50% and my cold/wet weather Klim gloves were put on.
    Perfect! Except for the winds. The famous “high winds” warning signs, covered with folks travel decals, we passed by without stopping.
    Everywhere you look, Guancano are there. Lots and lots of them. Horn beeps seem to amuse them. And lots of Rhea (like a huge Emu) are all over. Today a Guanaco and a Rhea ran across the road in front of me, causing an emergency braking to take place. I also almost nailed two Armadillo. But no! No animals died today by my front wheel!
    We finally arrived in Gobernador Gregores and met up with Ian H. ! Made a quick stop at a grocery store and had a nice pasta/meat/veggies meal for dinner with a local IPA. Now it’s time to settle down and either get the fireplace going here or put on some layers.
    So it looks like Ian will join our group tomorrow. Destination is Tres Lagos via the Rt 27/Rt 288 detour around the bad section of Ruta 40 we’ve heard about. Just under 6 hours riding. As long as winds aren’t an issue and rain stays away, I’m ready!
  8. Jay_In_Milpitas

    Jay_In_Milpitas Zero to sixty in February

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2016
    Oddometer:
    630
    Location:
    Milpitas, CA
    I was looking at your Spot thing, chose to zoom out, and see that you are now further South than the most Southern point of New Zealand.
    Look at it yourself and let that sink in.
    Ohio_Danimal likes this.
  9. HG HG

    HG HG Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    Ohio
    Super Bowl Sunday, in case you wanted to know what is happening in the States today.

    It looks like you are APPROXIMATELY 500 miles from Ushuaia. How exciting is that!

    Your adventures have been AWESOME.

    Be safe and RIDE ON............
    btrrtlwtr and Ohio_Danimal like this.
  10. poppawheelie

    poppawheelie Long timer

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    Jul 16, 2003
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    Central Pennsylvania
    Don't miss the chocolate shop in Ushuaia. :dukegirl
    95Monster and Ohio_Danimal like this.
  11. jimjim

    jimjim Just another FF!

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
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    oHIo
    Assume you will be visiting Glaciar Perito Moreno, looks like an amazing site to see.
    Ohio_Danimal likes this.
  12. poppawheelie

    poppawheelie Long timer

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    Found it! Picture of my favorite chocolate shop in Ushuaia, that is. There are many chocolate shops on Av. San Martin. See if you can find this one, if it's still there. It's the best! You like chocolate, right? Picture is 2001 - gawd time flies - it might not still be there. Try Chocolates del Turista if not.

    IMG_2978.JPG
    td63, Gordon, 95Monster and 1 other person like this.
  13. Juan Cruz

    Juan Cruz Just riding

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2017
    Oddometer:
    40
    Location:
    Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Spotted!
    IMG_20200203_192417.jpg
    td63, ChicoProf, Gordon and 11 others like this.
  14. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2009
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    3,929
    Location:
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (The Crooked River)
    Hola de El Calafate Argentina.
    Olaf and I rode here yesterday along with Ian H. and took the Rt. 27/Rt. 288 bypass of the bad section of Ruta 40 everyone was talking about. It was a long 488 km day with a lot of it unpaved rocks and gravel. But we arrived here safely and are camping at El Overjero campground. Nice showers and facilities though a bit crowded. But that’s to be expected because of the nearby glacier (Glaciar Pero Moreno) that is one of the largest around. Supposedly you can often see and hear large calving of sheets on the water.
    Olaf and I booked seats on the noon bus to the glacier, getting back to camp around 8pm.
    We thought Sergio and Kurt intended to visit El Calafate too, and were thinking that the extra day here would allow them to catch up, but it seems now that they’re staying on the east coast and heading further south than us and will hit Ushuaia a few days earlier than us.
    Oh well. Was cool riding with them while it lasted. Safe travels you two.
    El Calafate is a fancy touristy town similar to Bariloche. Nice stores and restaurants. It’s got it all! And lots of Hostals, which we found nearly all were booked, hence the tent use. It’s fine. I like camping and my Big Agnes mattress system is muy comfortable. And it’s cheaper than a room too. Saving more money cooking meals. Tonight was chicken breasts and fresh veggies with toasted buns.
    I’ll try to get pictures up soon. I’ve been kinda busy lol. And wifi here sucks lol.
    ChicoProf, BillUA, elron and 6 others like this.
  15. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

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    Location:
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    ChicoProf likes this.
  16. poppawheelie

    poppawheelie Long timer

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    El Calafate is more than a tourist town. It's the staging point, along with El Chalten, for climbers who come from around the world to climb the Fitz Roy. You can meet some serious adventurers there in El Calafate.
    95Monster likes this.
  17. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Mar 3, 2013
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    Location:
    UK
    Not me, then. It's on my to-do list because of the rock art at Punta Walichi. Also puntawalichi.com (in Spanish).

    Quite a lot of ancient rock art:
    [​IMG]

    Signposted on the main road on Google street view
  18. poppawheelie

    poppawheelie Long timer

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    Wow! I missed that. 4000 years! Thanks for the link.
    Ohio_Danimal and DavidM1 like this.
  19. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

    Joined:
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    Glaciar Perito Moreno, Argentina

    0EEB84A1-F122-4F1E-8BDE-28EE542CE77C.jpeg E4C291CC-47CB-44F7-848E-BDD9D23132AD.jpeg
    td63, Gordon, BillUA and 11 others like this.
  20. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    Nov 27, 2009
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    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta
    That glacier is standing up well. I'm more familiar with the Columbia Icefields on the Jasper-Banff Parkway. There are sign markers back to the 1960s indicating where the foot of the glacier once was. It's quite an eye-opener how far its receded in our time.
    95Monster and poppawheelie like this.