D.I.Y. Cam Chain Replacement

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Dieselboy, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    No and that's the rub. We definitely could benefit from a master link chain.
    #81
  2. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Absolutely. Left cover has to come off to reach the tensioner rail screw. The rails could then be pulled out the top.
    #82
  3. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    Sweet. That's more what I had in mind!
    Thanks again for pioneering this process; great documentation along the way as well.
    #83
  4. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Zip tie the cam chain.


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    Check and make sure this retaining pin is in place.


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    Set the sector star to neutral


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    Align the gears. You have it right when you can spin the output shaft.


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    This picture becomes important later. That groove is the timing mark for TDC.


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    The top red pointer show the gap in the bearing locating ring. Make sure it is up and not aligned with the sealing faces. The other pointer shows the locking element that must be in the notch.


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    Another gap in a bearing locating ring. Must be up.


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    Make sure the bearing shells are in the case bottom and lightly lube with oil.


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    No pic of the application of sealant. I was a bit focused on the task at the time. It is not hard but you don't want to screw it up. The book has a diagram I will come back and edit in.

    Here's the juice.


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    Seat the bottom of the crank case. You have to raise the counter balancer up and through as you lower the bottom into position. I had an extra set of hands (and eyes) because you are lowering the mating surface with sealant and don’t want to get that stuff on any of the gears or crank. [EDIT: I had an extra set of hands to help. We made several dry runs seating the case without sealant. This allowed us to choreograph our moves and made using sealant much easier.]


    Reinsert the bearing stud and retaining pin.


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    Torque it down.


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    Next insert the output shaft seal. I’m probably going to replace this. I reused the old seal because the new one is not here. And I failed to “pack the space between the inner sealing lips of the new shaft sealing ring with grease.” Totally missed that one.


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    Preping the left cover.


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    Align camber as indicated by the red “T” and check the oil ports.


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    Slip the selector shaft in. Return spring slides over the reamed pin. Shaft fits into the guide bushing (not shown- it’s under the shaft in the pic).


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    Ensure the projection engage the selector star (it’s obvious when you are looking at it.)



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    Put the spacer back on.


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    You can use the special tool, but I think the tape worked fine to protect the splines.


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    Lay in the gasket.


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    Now seat the cover and tighten all the screws. Oddly I have no picture but more importantly I did not see a torque specification for this cover. I need to check that.


    EDIT: Found the torque and sequence. My original printout did not have it. I don't know why.


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    Rotate the crank to get that groove from the earlier picture aligned with the hole for the crank locking tool. Lock it back down the TDC on cylinder 1.


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    Next is the swing-arm shaft cover. Prep the surfaces and insert the pressure retaining valve.


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    Gasket.


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    Don’t use these three holes.


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    Because those three holes get filled now.


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    Now put the oil pan on.


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    Install the counter sprocket. 50 nm. Book calls for MP3 paste on the gear and shaft. Near as I can figure that means anti-seize. Loctite 243 the bolt.


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    Flip the engine and clean the surfaces.


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    Put the shims back in place.


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    Install the intake cam shaft. Watch the bearing surfaces. Don’t damage any.


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    Make sure the cam chain is tight to the crank gear.


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    Lay in the other cam and make sure the alignment marks are in the proper place for TDC.


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    Make sure the water pump gear is not bound.


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    Drop in the guard rail.


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    You are supposed to use new seals. I didn’t.


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    #84
  5. Tbone

    Tbone off-ramp slayer

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    I don't even own a GS800 and am really enjoying the thread and impressed with your documentation efforts!
    #85
  6. Dansrc51

    Dansrc51 I need a cape....

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    :clap

    Thank you!
    #86
  7. JRWooden

    JRWooden Homeless motorcycle vagabond ... and ... loving it

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    DB:
    First, THANKS for all the extra work documenting this process.
    After seeing your pictures, I can not imagine doing this without a rig to hold the engine.

    Second, I'm thinking about our stators burning up and wondering about the right side cover...
    What are these two holes for, if you remember? :huh

    stator.jpg
    #87
  8. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Those are shaft guides for the gears at the bottom of this picture.


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    +1 on the engine stand. I had not made provision for one and was just planning on man handling the thing (or making a wooden jig somehow) The conversation just happened by coincidence when I found out that it might be possible to lay one on. I've tried to say "flip" every time just to catch the attention of anyone contemplating this operation.
    #88
  9. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    We'll see if the exciting part is yet to come, i.e. the starter button....:deal







    Welcome. And the documentation was two fold in purpose: to return to the community some of what I've gained over the years, and to slow me down. I tend to plow ahead when I have a target in sight and I wanted to be meticulous with this project.
    #89
  10. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Apply engine oil to the friction faces for the camshafts of the bearing cap unit and install.


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    Install chain damper retainer with the chain damper. I thought it was called a guide rail. Go figure....


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    Remove the locking screw again.


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    At this point, you turn the engine over two slow revolutions to see if there are any issues. [EDIT: make sure the cam chain tensioner is in place BEFORE you rotate the engine. Adjust the timing as necessary.] First look through the timing hole to see the TDC mark and verify the cam sprockets are reading -EX- -IN-. I'm borrowing Larger Meister's pic.

    Turn the engine using the countershaft sprocket. (Oh, and put the shift lever back on because the engine is in neutral.) Stop if you meet any resistance. Compression? Anyone? Okay so I'm sure if you do this for a living resistance is a clear experience. So with some trepidation, I pushed the engine around.


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    Seal the timing hole. 25nm.


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    I went ahead and screwed in the spark plugs now.
    #90
  11. JRWooden

    JRWooden Homeless motorcycle vagabond ... and ... loving it

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    Thanks DB!
    I wasn't thinking about the starter drive!
    #91
  12. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    My sealant was not viable so had to go get some more. Here's what I'm using.


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    Here's the first application. Just to this spot.


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    Drop in the gasket.


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    Hand tighten.



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    Moving on. Valve cover. Clean it well.


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    Second application to the gasket. I decided to reuse my original gasket and save the new one for the next valve check. I spent 30 minutes with a toothpick cleaning the surface of old sealant.


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    Engine is buttoned up. I now need another set of hands to maneuver it in to the frame.



    Let's clean.



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    Tired of waiting....Seems like no time has passed......Actually I killed three hours. So I'm moving on. Going up is tough. Going lower is more doable. I put the engine on the ground so I could remount the starter.


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    ABS pressure-modulator bracket.


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    I locate the frame bolts.



    Here's my system. The page is numbered. The bag is numbered. The bolts are tagged by location. The spacers are zipped in. I want no guess work as to where the parts go.



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    Still waiting....what does this thing weigh? Let's see.


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    Sans fluids

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    Taping up. Put me in coach.


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    Finally the calvary arrives. First attempt we move in using the ABS modulator as the guide. Notice that the cylinders are canted slightly forward. This won't work. The rear and the front top of the engine impact the frame.


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    Second attempt. We have the cylinders vertical. Of note the bike is also suspended. The rear is higher. The plan is to lower the back of the bike around the engine.


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    Front frame bolts go in first. Carefully align and hand thread bolts until snug. The right side has a spacer.


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    We are off reservation here. The book plan includes the scissor jack with mounting studs. (Conspicuously absent from the photos) But if you had that then you could lower away on the bike and have a perfect alignment.

    The front bolts go in easily. slowly, I move the bike down but the jack is too high. Eventually we inch down and remove the jack and push the motor into the rear mount.


    The straps provide a fractional tension to get the bolt holes exactly aligned.


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    Notice the muck on the right rear. I regret not cleaning that earlier. This was the critical bolt- last of 4. Microns off. Nudge this way. Nudge that way. Test without the spacer. Finally aligned, spacer inserted, and tightened.

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    Back around to torque. Rear mounts are 38Nm. Front are 66Nm.


    On the left rear you can't fit the socket through the frame to the bolt. Perhaps with different tools it works but standard equipment doesn't work. Split the socket off and feed the extension through.


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    My plan is risky-- anchor the front and pivot the engine into the rear mounts. I'm not talking a free swing. All I want is the front bolts to provide alignment so I can seat the rear. But the opportunity for issues was at it's highest due to the weight and balance involved. Stress on threads. Misaligned frames. Shifting weight. It's mounted. I was careful. It was stressful.

    If I had to do it again, or if you want a recommendation, put the bike on the centerstand and measure the height of the rear mount holes. Put the engine on the jack, cylinders vertical, and insert it into the frame at the measure height. At least this way, when the I lower the bike, I can know where to stop the jack and then insert all four bolts. [EDIT: another idea would be to use wooden dowels in the front threads to assist with alignment. Put the rear bolts in first then replace the wooden dowels. This alleviates the chance of thread damage while you are pushing the engine to get the rear holes aligned.]


    I'm done for the night.
    #92
  13. JRWooden

    JRWooden Homeless motorcycle vagabond ... and ... loving it

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    GREAT work :clap
    #93
  14. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Location:
    Grand Valley, Colorado
    Awesome write up..... Makes me appreciate the 1 hr job the CC takes on my DRZ......:D

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
    #94
  15. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Thanks.

    All of you go buy your tech a drink. They deserve it. Even without all of this picture taking and note making this job is more that 8 hours. :norton
    #95
  16. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Six frame bolts. The right side all have spacers. The left do not. On the left only the front bolt has a washer.


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    Radiator brackets

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    New bolt. Rear brake.


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    Seat the ABS Pressure Modulator.


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    Re-attach the brake lines. This entry came before the modulator in the book. I did it and had to back track to seat the modulator.


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    While I’m thinking about it, this needs to be torqued. 12Nm


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    Attach ground.

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    Connect oil pressure switch plug, coolant temperature sensor


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    Clutch cable.


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    Pull covers (rags) and position collar clamps. Seat throttle-valve assembly.

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    Connect both injection-valve plugs.


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    Connect pressure-sensor plug


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    Connect throttle-valve potentiometer plug.


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    Put back the zip ties. Sorry no pics but the book does provide reference.


    Connect throttle cable. To the left of my thumb. I was trying to figure out what I was grabbing the assembly.


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    Connect coils.


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    Put the left foot peg back on.


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    Heat shield.


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    Probably missed it, but I didn't see any mention of the coolant lines. I want them on before the exhaust.

    [EDIT: Note the tag on the positive starter wire. It wasn't necessary BUT tagging all of the wires was helpful in catching the eyes during the re-install. I could easily see there was a wire that needed a home. So the tags were more useful for just spotting a wire and not so much for what the wire was. I will definitely do this again.]


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    Right one first. Attach them at the top then do this side.


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    Exhaust. 14 Nm with locktite


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    A casualty.


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    I tried to resuscitate but the angles were bad for stability.


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    Meow.


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    This space is suppose to be here. If you haven't hung out under your gas tank, you may never have noticed before. 19 Nm.


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    Start reconnecting the wires. I have to say, I tried to follow the book but failed for attachment points. They are designated but hard to decipher the pics. Good luck. Pay better attention than I did to the cuts you make on disassembly.


    Start with the O2 sensor.


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    Moving on... you'll have to figure this out. I did a really poor job of documenting the cable runs.


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    But I did tag all the ends so I got them all back together just not back where the belong (mostly).


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    Radiator.


    If you cut the zip tie to remove the plug, time to put it back.

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    This was fun. There are three studs and only one bolt. Two on top and one to the bottom left. Insert it from the right.

    [EDIT: I used white lithium grease to lube the studs and receivers.]


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    First reconnect the plug. Then plug in the hoses to the water pump. Then seat the top stud, bottom left and finally the bottom right screw. 5Nm BTW. I took some risk here and estimated.



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    Insert dirt trap. Push the back edge up as far as you can.
    [EDIT: There are two tabs on top of the dirt trap that snap onto the fan housing. Make sure they seat.]


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    Affix the reservoir.


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    Put the covers back in place. Sorry no pic. First do the bolt and nut at the bottom center of the radiator screen. Then do the two screws up top.


    I thought now would be a good time to put in the oil. The books says to do it on the bench. I took a vote and all of me thought that was stupid. But, lest I forget....


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    Wires to the starter.


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    Positive under the wrench. Negative at the red zip tie.


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    Install the cam shaft sensor and wire it.


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    Swing arm next.


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    #96
  17. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    Cleanest that swing arm's been since I bought this bike.


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    Shock bolt next. 100Nm. Optimoly TA? How about some anti seize?


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    Next the chain slide rail. 4Nm? Really?


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    Cut the brake away from its stowage on the frame and secure the brake-line cover.

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    Wheel.


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    Intake air silencer.


    Connect four hoses on the underside.


    Don’t forget the bolts and plug in the three plugs.


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    Battery is back in.


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    Now I can remove my reminder card "coolant" from on top of the ignition. I got distract when it was due. Now have the time. Book says capacity is 1.65 liters. I used the measuring cup to be sure. It only took 1.5 l.


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    Pop the radiator cap and top tot the bottom of the filler neck.


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    Open the drain hole on the water pump until there are no bubbles coming out. It poured out about 400 ml total.


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    Top the radiator and close it. Then fill the expansion tank to maximum mark and close it up.

    [EDIT: if you are working with your radiator, READ THIS POST].


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    So let&'s check things out.....I just spent 12 hours putting together the most complicated puzzle I've ever worked on and I have no idea if the thing is going to work!

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    I run back through my notes. I scan the manual. Check and double check. What have I forgotten? Pace.....look.....pray....Lets Go!


    It Lives!!!!!!!!!



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    I run her briefly and listen. Nothing seems amiss. Walk and inspect and do it again. I want to see if the radiator fan will come on so run her and wait.

    Smoke?


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    Turns out to be radiator fluid escaping from the upper coolant line. For the record I despise the design of that connection! It only has a lip on about 1/3 of the circumference of the pipe! No wonder we get leaks and hoses walking off.


    So now I wait for the bike to cool down and reload the radiator. She only took 200 ml additional.


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    Second run is smoke free. Fan comes on. I run her for a minute and shut down the bike to check the oil. None registering? Okay I've not torn into an engine before is this normal? I add 500ml for a total now of 3.4 liters and get a 1/4 dip stick mark. I'm good with that for now.....besides I'm out of oil.



    I put on the crash bars and hook up my add ons. She's ready for a test ride....but that will have to wait for a dry spot in the weather and some sunlight.....


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    #97
  18. Motorfiets

    Motorfiets Long timer

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    Oct 1, 2007
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    2,981
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    Southern California
    :clap congrats!!! sticky please!
    #98
  19. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Oddometer:
    5,440
    Location:
    Nor Ca.
    I think you led us astray. You are an excellenct mechanic. Great pics on how to do it. Helped me realize it is not something I will want to tackle:clap
    #99
  20. fiwi

    fiwi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    151
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    I feel sick reading this thread:puke1. Honestly, I cannot believe the amount of work involved in replacing the chain. The fact that you have the nous, and the willingness to do it is beyond belief to me, seriously. Fantastic job!.:clap