D3O, should we avoid it?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by cyclopathic, Jul 26, 2017.

  1. dyg

    dyg dyg it Supporter

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    Had it happen to some of my Forcefield knee armor within a year - stuff does not like flexing evidently. Forcefield graciously replaced.
    #21
  2. Tor

    Tor Making Life A Ride, One Corner At A Time

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    I've had my Badlands jacket and pants for 4 years, and all of the D3O's are still good and in one piece.
    #22
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  3. hamiamham

    hamiamham Been here awhile

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    C-3PO & R2-D2. MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU!!!!!!!
    #23
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  4. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

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    wow!
    #24
  5. avster

    avster Been here awhile

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    I've had two pad failures in the last five years. I had one Furygan D3O knee pad fail where it flexes. I'd ridden about 60,000 miles over three years with those pads. The other knee pad was fine, but replaced as a pair. I've had one elbow pad fail (elbow separated from forearm extension) in a jacket that had done about 40,000 miles, but that was one of the normal dark grey foam ones not D30 - I replaced with D30 without hesitation. Just checked, the one jacket I have with a D3O back pad is about five years old and probably 50,000 miles; the protector is fine. I've not crash tested them.

    This is just an additional data point. Obviously usage and design differs - failure could be more frequent if you are a different shape to me, or your pad is a different design, or if you flex your back more, or use a backpack, or your jacket pouch rubs on it, or...
    #25
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  6. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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    It looks like there are many versions of D30 :hmmmmm

    Rukka’s D30 XTR upgrade is Level 2 certified in ambient, wet and cold conditions. Whereas the D30 that comes fitted in Rukka clothing as standard is only Level 1.

    Whereas the Klim Aero Pro D30 is CE-certified as Level 2 in both hot and cold conditions.

    I wonder how much durability varies with different versions of D30 :scratch
    #26
  7. Boxerbreath

    Boxerbreath Old 'nuff to know better...

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    D30 does the job, but for myself, in cold weather when you put the jacket on it’s stiff stuff, which is annoying.
    I like the armor in Rev’It jackets better, whichever one that is.
    #27
  8. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Searsoft.
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  9. Fastman

    Fastman Been here awhile

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    I’ve had one D30 back pad in a Klim jacket crack and it was replaced at no charge. It was exposed to a lot of cold weather riding (30°-40°) and storage. I assumed it cracked from repeated donning of my jacket after sitting overnight in an unheated garage.
    #29
  10. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    I'm done with D30. It's too hard on impact and has too many issues with cracking.
    #30
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  11. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    Knox microlock is the way to go with soft armor. When I got my level 2 knee armor, I put them in the freezer overnight, pulled the soft, still flexible armor out of freezer, set it on my knee and dropped. Love it.
    #31
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  12. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    super lightweight too (except for the back piece) - unlike d3o which manages to be heavy as heck. I’ve found a combination of microlock ce2 limb armor & a layered nitrile mix backpad to be my favorite (seesoft/Bmw np2/many others).
    #32
  13. Valentino

    Valentino Been here awhile

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    Does anyone know how the longevity of these compares?

    SAS-TEC recommend changing their armour every 5 years. I wonder if it's similar for D30, Microlock or nitrile rubber :confused

    Though D30 themselves say they use a different formulation for each type of application. There's even two types of D30 for Rukka, depending whether you get the Level 1 or Level 2 armor. However, I've no idea if this would impact the armor's longevity.
    #33
  14. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    I'd guess it's similar - you can really tell with SasTec stuff since it gets much less flexible over time.
    #34
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  15. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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    I vaguely recall reading that Knox armour lasts 5 years too.

    I wonder how few people replace their clothing’s body armour ever 5 years. Most of my gear’s a lot more than 5 years old and I doubt I’m alone
    #35
  16. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    D3O also recommends a 5 year replacement cycle.

    I'd think it depends which armor you have, and if the formulation is designed for hot/cold cycling as well. I'm guessing the older non-temp stable formulations were especially vulnerable to decay.
    #36
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  17. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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    #37
  18. hamiamham

    hamiamham Been here awhile

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    the best armor is the armor you actually wear.

    i think you get armor that is either high protective or is comfortable. Armor that is both is a bit of a unicorn.

    As compared to the quad armor and some others, the D30 is very thin, very flexible, lightweight, and flows some air. It maybe not be as protective but that is the trade-off....
    #38
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  19. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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    Armour has come on leaps and bounds. I’ve got Level 2 D30 armour, plus some BMW NP2 Level 2 protectors. Both are very comfortable, and the D30 is well vented too. It’s nicer to wear than my older Level 1 hard armour.

    I think fit determines comfort. I don’t notice I’m wearing Level 2 armour that fits well.
    #39
  20. ThrillSeeka

    ThrillSeeka Been here awhile

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    A bit of a unicorn?

    At least four companies are already certifying their limb armor to Level 2 T+/T-, which is the highest level of CE certification attainable under EN 1621-1:2012. Not just that but the armor is also comfortable and lightweight. It also contours like a second skin which further enhances impact protection.

    Back armor CE-certified as Level 2 with one further optional condition test passed as Level 2 can be found anywhere from a wide number of brands.

    With all my due respect, fellow rider, have you checked the latest motorcycling-armor offerings from the big brands?

    Also and in defense of D3O, the "very thin, very flexible, lightweight" armor that you're complaining of is limited to their Level-1 entry-level armor. Their CE-Level-2 armor is as thick as competing high-end viscoelastic armor.

    I do have a few complaints regarding the trend of viscoelastic-foam armor, but a lack of high (impact-absorbing) protection or comfort isn't one of them. One complaint is that some companies are making pads that are just big enough to certify as Type B. Also, barely any decent hard-shell armor for on-road riding available nowadays.
    #40