Decision time.... Africa twin vs KTM 790 adventure

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by scrapy, Dec 17, 2018.

  1. enduro16

    enduro16 Been here awhile

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    Seriously dude, get a life...
    #61
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  2. Sumi

    Sumi Long timer

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    Harley ofcourse
    #62
  3. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice The Virginian

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    Looks like the OP is long gone.

    I just read the pinned article on the home page.

    Looks like the 790 is a game changer. When you factor in $12,499 price, you are getting lots of stuff with your kit.
    Being a fuel economy and range guy, I like most of all the 5.3 gallon tank and design. The design will make the bike handle way better at slow speeds and such.
    Perhaps she will handle like she is 430lb!! (Wet).

    It's smart to offer CC as an extra.

    So, for the 450-500lbs range of MC. The 790 owns that category. You will not see them much in the show room floor at that price.

    So, the AT is not really in the exact same category as the 790. Sure Price is very close and so is the hp.
    Nothing really is in the same category. Hence , the game changer. The Yamaha T7 is actually the closes for dirt riding.

    But, the AT is close enough to compete.

    The big difference will come down to price. A used farkled AT could be $5,000 cheaper.
    Buying brand new...
    More street, go with one of the four AT trims that best fits.
    More dirt, go with the R
    More communting, go with the AT
    More long distance street touring, go with the ATAS
    Best ADV Bike (gone for weeks) for those with no off road skills.... the R most likely has the advantage. That is what is so great about her. The R will get more riders to put on their first Orange shirt at $12,499.
    Granted, I would lean more towards a used AT DCT.
    #63
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  4. Tenbikesail

    Tenbikesail Adventurer

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    That may have been true in the past but my current KTM 1059 Adventure has been perfectly reliable and dependable. The Africa twin is actually as heavy as my 1050 but twice as boring to ride.
    #64
  5. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    don't cheat yourself, it is still true although not as drastic like in the past.
    KTM got better and Japanese got worse, hence the smaller gap.
    #65
  6. enduro16

    enduro16 Been here awhile

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    Go troll somewhere else..
    #66
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  7. Deliverator

    Deliverator not a replicant

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    I rented a manual AT more than a year ago and rode it for a day on the road. It performed well moving and was comfortable. Three things bothered me, low-speed (I mean parking lot and street parking) maneuvering, the engine sound when hot (a bit high-pitched with stock exhaust), and the windscreen efficiency on a hot and still day kept me very hot when in city or town traffic in the afternoon, which I suppose is actually a plus.

    I got my first look at the KTM 790 Adventures on Friday. Haven't ridden it, the models I saw were dry. The seat height on the S was lower than the AT, lower than I expected although the dealer could not tell me what the setting was I assume it was the lower one. The seat height on the R was substantially higher than the AT. The width of the seat on the 790s is larger than the AT at the riding position, this may have added to my subjective impression of the seat height. The photos I had seen of the tank design did not prepare me for seeing the actual item. The lower lobes are dramatically large and protruding, a dominating feature. I don't see how they could possibly get the fuel load lower, which of course is a plus. I imagined the plastic they were made of the be closer to that of my Clarke tank, but it does not have any flex similar to the Clarke.

    What I am reading on this site is that the observed weight of the 790 is 464 lbs. wet, 50 lbs. less than the AT, given as 515 lbs. wet for the manual version. The AT fuel load is nowhere close to being as low as the 790s. As disconcerting as the tank protrusion was for me, I am hopeful that the 790 solves the low-speed maneuvering issue I had with the AT.

    Honda has a reputation for reliability, and I have been able to get repairs done and replace parts on the road at a reasonable price with the one I ride now. At least some folks believe that KTMs are mechanically troublesome. It seems their dealer network is not as established and parts are more expensive than my Honda. I can recall a ride report through Central and South America on this site where the reporter speaks of the inability to find the "unicorn blood" that serves as oil for a companion's KTM.

    Does anyone have significant experience with KTM mechanical reliability?
    #67
  8. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud Supporter

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    Just found this thread, as I've been reading up on the 790s recently and am very intrigued by them.

    I owned a 950 Adventure for a few years ago, and loved the lowered CG offered by the saddlebag fuel tanks similar to what KTM has mounted on the 790. For my use at the time with it though, fun as it was riding the 950 it was like driving nails with a sledge hammer.

    I was fortunate enough to go on an Alps ride last fall with three friends (all of us on rented bikes), and rode an Africa Twin for a while during one of our bike swaps (I'd rented a 950 Multistrada). Although I'd been looking forward to trying an AT ever since they came out, I have to admit I was underwhelmed while my friend who'd rented the AT (a former roadracer with a large bike collection), couldn't say enough good things about it.

    The 790's lower overall weight, as well as how it's carried, is very appealing to me along with many other all-around aspects of the bike and I'm hoping to look at one next weekend. My R1200GSW could just possibly find itself displaced out of the garage in the near future.....
    #68
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  9. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    I have ridden both AT and 790R and there is simply no comparison between those bikes.
    You would be way more better off comparing AT to 1090R, that much AT engine is superior to 790R.
    #69
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  10. Newbusa

    Newbusa Long timer

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    I also have been on both the 1090 and Africa Twin. I actually bought the 1090R after that test ride . I also have a 790 Duke and can say without a doubt my 790 Duke is faster then the Africa Twin, while I’ve never been on a 790 Adv I can’t see that it would be that far different from the Duke in performance. Also Dyno charts that I’ve seen of the Africa Twin are all in the high 80 hp range, while the 790 is in the 90 range with a lot less weight. My friend had a Africa Twin and it weighed in at the same weight as my 1090R.
    #70
  11. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    faster? what speed has to do with anything for an adventure focused bike? especially if you're comparing to street engine 790 mounted on street light bike? duke weighs 174kg/383lb wet, do you realize that? I don't like many things about AT but engine performance for off-rad and handling is excellent. 790 has simple not enough torque for me, don't care about top HP.
    #71
  12. Newbusa

    Newbusa Long timer

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    Do I realize how much my 790 Duke weighs? I can tell you it’s more than 383 wet lol. I actually had it on a scale it’s 414 wet:-)Remember I actually rode all these bikes before making a decision to buy. I actually found the AT quite underwhelming to ride and I really wanted to like it.
    #72
  13. JohnnyWaffles

    JohnnyWaffles Been here awhile

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    When you're two-up with luggage and your wife urges you to break your previous passing record of an RV + eight cars.
    #73
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  14. opanos

    opanos Been here awhile

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    problem is that 790 is one of the ugliest bikes I've ever seen.
    I don't know how good or bad this bike is (apparently it is quite good), but looks matter too...If I would go to buy a new motorcycle right now, just for the looks I would go for the T7...early test rides already claim that is quite capable on and off road (the lower price is of course one more plus)
    #74
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  15. aage

    aage Been here awhile

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    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder ;-).

    I had a beautiful ATAS DCT and I loved that bike. I now have a KTM 790 Adventure R and I love that bike more then I did the ATAS. Its is lighter and it feels MUCH lighter, has better suspension , worse wind protection ( I´m working on that one ) , its easier to work on and cheaper to crash. Did a 2 up 200km ride the day before yesterday and it used about 4L/100km , that gives me about 500km range. BTW it was driving at legal speed of 90km/hour the hole time. My gf loves it and I love both of them ;-). For me riding in Iceland where I live , going up on the highland , crossing rivers etc the KTM is the better bike.

    Screenshot 2019-06-18 at 09.46.25.jpg
    #75
  16. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    because on the street it will be, it's a big/heavy dual sport so if you don't ride off-road I agree, waste of money.
    #76
  17. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    In my opinion, where the KTM has the upper hand is the suspension; the AT suspension is far too soft and one almost has to assume that an AT will require new forks around 10k.

    Even new leftover (2017) AT DCTs are going for about $10k. Add a few thousand for an Ohlins package and the prices line up again, or get lucky and find a lightly used AT with Swedish Suspenders on it already.
    #77
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  18. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    yeah, if only AT comes out from factory with WP suspension and tubeless wheels it would be perfect adventure bike indeed, not to mention best looking.
    #78
  19. opanos

    opanos Been here awhile

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    I don't believe that you have to go the ''ohlins way'' to get a decent suspension on the AT. Maybe it's not a top class but it is quite descent, we are not in the '80s anymore, and you can always spring and revalve your suspensions to your own taste, with far less money than just swapping everything
    #79
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  20. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    I agree with your statement in most cases - I've really liked the racetech valves in prior bikes, and I've heard good things about Andreani cartridges. Shocks can be rebuilt for about half the price of a new Ohlins unit.

    However, when it comes to the AT forks the issue is the internal gouging on the fork uppers, so they'll need to be replaced. You can buy new AT uppers for ~$800 every 10k, get ATAS uppers and shim the bushings for a bit more (and revalve/spring while you're in there for another $500), or just pony up for the Ohlin's forks and be done with it.
    #80