DIRT NAPPER - Self Rescue Device

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Trialsman, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    About nine years ago I had time to think as I lay pinned under my Husaberg FE570. My boot had gotten stuck when the bike fell over - wheels up. Even though I was riding with a friend who is a fellow inmate, he was in front and it took him twenty minutes until he realized I was not behind him. I had no way to get out and had nothing within reach to pry the bike off my foot which was pinned against a root. More recently while riding my Guzzi Stelvio NTX I often thought “what if “ I went over when riding alone? This bike is just too heavy for me to even upright if it goes over in a parking lot! I have been playing around with ideas for several years and finally, after 12 or 13 prototypes I had a friend make a tool for self-rescue. He has fifty of them completed and a thread where another inmate had fallen and couldn’t get up sparked me to start this thread. As we get older and the bikes seem to get heavier, it is important we can right a bike that decided to take a "DIRT NAP".

    There are an infinite number of variables in this adventure riding sport and sometimes things just happen. I have had one of these strapped behind the seat of each of my bikes testing them for several years. When a nap occurred I would deploy what I now call the DIRT NAPPER and use it to right the bike. Each time, and with many different bikes, I took note of things that might work better if......then I would change the design.

    Let me give you some specs so you can see the quality and thought that went into this project.

    there are three sections of 0.125” walled 6061 aircraft extruded aluminum tubing 1”x1”x 12.5”
    the base plate is 6061 aircraft alloy and is 3”x 6”x 0.25” thick
    pieces of 0.125” walled 0.75”x 0.75” 6061 tubing span each joint with 2.5” overlap for strength
    the base joint has a 1.25” collar TIG welded and a milled in 0.25” step for a more rigid joint
    the ratchet is designed for 1000# working load and 3000# break strength
    the ratchet gate was modified to permit easy roll up of webbing without snags
    a Kydex guide was added to smoothly track the webbing onto a uniform roll
    a 0.75”x 0.75”x 7” handle is provided to increase leverage - heat shrink added for non slip grip
    hardware is stainless steel for strength and corrosion resistance
    webbing is 1” x 0.42” thick and rated at 1462# break strength
    the total amount of lift with the webbing is 32” with 46 strokes
    clear marking for the extent of travel so as not to jamb the webbing too tight in ratchet
    a large 4.5” double reinforced loop is provided at the end of the web to place over foot peg
    a vinyl coated hook is provided if you choose to hook to a frame or other support
    each unit has been test fitted for ease of use
    aluminum is powder coated for protection and looks
    complete with bands to hold together when stored
    Velcro strap for front brake included
    stuff sack with reflective strip and logo
    ABS stiffener used inside the stuff sack to spread surface area against seat or tank

    More info and pictures to follow edit: 4# weight

    Attached Files:

    #1
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  2. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]



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  3. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    The idea was for solo adventure-style riding but I have now used it several times while riding WITH others. This past summer I had a get off near the top of Imogene Pass, Colorado (13,114'). It was a good thing I packed my Dirt Napper behind the seat as it was an hour and a half until the rest of the group caught up to me. It would have been a very long wait while watching all of my gas pour out of the vent hose. The device is very simply constructed from aircraft alum square tubing for maximum strength and minimum weight. The entire device is under four pounds. The mechanical advantage for lifting is gained by a modified cargo ratchet. I have lifted the Moto Guzzi Stelvio, BMW F800GSA, KTM 990 Adventure, KTM 690, Enduro BMW R1200GS, and many of my dirt bikes - all full of gas. I carry it across the back of the seat so I can get to it no matter how I fall. It can be deployed in about three minutes and may take another two or three to raise the bike. You can see it in the bag (about 14"x3"x4") behind the seat of the Stelvio in the first picture. For the piece of mind and capability it gives me I will put up with the extra four pounds. Of course if my new V85 is as light as they claim I guess I could carry a monster truck winch in it's place. I still like off road and sometimes I just need a little edge on things.
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  4. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    There are fifty of these completed so far, and will be sold at a very modest price because it is our belief it could make a real difference in one of our inmate’s ability to get out of a very bad situation. To that end the price has been set at $175, shipping CONUS will be $13.65 . Any overseas orders will pay the addition actual shipping. This will pay for materials, labor, and a profit that will ensure “Keith Products llc” will fill the demand. They will be setting up a PayPal account to make it easier. Until such time for an order just use the link below. The units will be shipped USPS Priority Mail. PayPal will be to: keith@keithproducts.us

    The link is:
    https://www.keithproducts.us/product/dirt-napper-adventure-bike-spill-recovery-jack
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  5. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    The most important thing is to be able to get to Dirt Napper no matter on which side you fall. Although it is small enough to go inside panniers I like to strap it behind the seat. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I learned early that a Velcro brake strap (included) keep the bike from rolling.
    [​IMG]


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  6. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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  7. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    These pictures are from one of the latter prototypes. The layout above is the final product being sold.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


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  8. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    After assembly you open the ratchet and extend the webbing. You can use the hook to secure to a frame member. On my bikes I like to just use the loop to go over the foot peg in the air. [​IMG][​IMG]


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  9. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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  10. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    The actual lifting of the bike is accomplished by the ratcheting up of the webbing. The foot is designed to dig in but it always a good ideas to be clear of the bike while jacking. Once you get to a comfortable height go around the opposite side and gently pull the bike to its full riding position. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


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  11. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    Here are some pictures of the fabrication. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


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  12. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    Here is lifting an F800GSA. [​IMG]


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  13. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    I spend a lot of time in Moto Guzzi threads and one of the inmates was discussing problems just picking up a Stelvio even on the level. I posted what ‘Keith Products llc” is making and he wrote the following (used with his permission):

    That! Looks pretty neat! Absolutely interested! 'Self-Rescue' drew me right in, I've got torn rotator cuffs and while I can get my bike up solo, I can imagine seeing a path too tempting, screwing up, dumping the big girl and hurting myself in the process.

    Something like this could be a real 'get out of hell in less then 30 days tool ', if you're out there like me doing some mid-life crisis riding because you 'used to be able to ride anything a lot faster then this anyway' -- I think you're going to sell out if these don't cost more than a winch.
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  14. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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  15. Bultaco206

    Bultaco206 Back-to-back motos suck Supporter

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    I think a video showing how it works would really be handy for you to have.
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  16. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Nice work; this looks great! :clap

    I had thought about making something similar for myself but never got around to it. I had both hips replaced and since then I have stopped riding off road solo so no longer need such a device, but if i did you'd have a buyer. I think you are going to sell a lot of these! :thumb
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  17. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    I made one video but it is really poor quality so I want to redo it. I even go as far as putting this on my Moto Guzzi Norge road bike. I wanted to try it on the Norge but didn't want to scuff it laying it over first in practice. I'm sure there would be no problem in the lift.

    If the weakest point, the 1462# break point of the webbing is used as the maximum, there should be a large safety factor. The bike will never be lifted vertically off the ground. I have not weighed the actual amount of the bike's true weight that will be lifted as it is really rotated into position. The wheels will still be in contact with the ground hence transferring a large portion of the bike's weight directly there. The actual amount of force needed to raise the bike is a fraction of the bike's true weight. If I lift my Stelvio at a curb weight of around 600# the effort really needed for the lift is going to be more like 250-300#. When the weather gets better I intend to set up a test where I will directly weigh the amount of force needed to lift a given bike's dead weight.
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  18. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    What part of PGH are you in? Do you want help shooting a video?
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  19. Trialsman

    Trialsman Been here awhile

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    Thanks Jason we can discuss it on Rufcut.
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  20. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Do you have them listed somewhere? (Amazon, fleeBay, etc)
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