Dirt riding, enduro & cross training skills

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by B1, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    riding along a log is usually only required in some endurocross events, but it's a handy skill to develop that has big benefits for everyday dirt riding. thanks to tim coleman for a pile of tips in this one!

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  2. Buschog

    Buschog Long timer

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    Looking forward to trials content.
  3. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    another serving of random poorly constructed snippets of dirt stuff. would you like cholesterol-enhancing fries with that?

    probably the most important part is the apparent drop of quality in sidi crossfire boots. long seen as the best all round boot (along with gaerne SG12), i know a few guys who have found their latest boots falling apart... me included. and it seems the distributor is scratching his head at all the returns and warranty claims too. anyone out there bought sidis in the past year or two and found the quality has dropped?

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  4. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

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    sorry to hear about issues with Sidi Crossfire boots. I ponied up for my first pair of Sidi Crossfires back in 2011 and they are STILL a great pair of boots. I hope any issues are quickly sorted out as I would love to buy another pair whenever I finally need another set.
  5. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    i've been checking around, a few years ago they started a new factory in romania, and now all mx boots except the SRS models are made in romania... the SRS are still made in italy. i strongly suspect they aren't keeping the quality control up in the new factory.
  6. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    Warning, this video contains a male nipple. And some tattoos. And a difficult kiss while performing a stoppie. I rewatched Sin City and got inspired to make this video, and as usual now I really regret making it lol. You are strongly advised not to watch it... especially if you liked Sin City. :D

  7. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    We don't get to do much wet weather riding down under, at least in the drier north. But I scoured the forums to pick up a pile of wet weather riding tips so hopefully you might find something new in this vid.

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  8. joeaverage

    joeaverage mediumcore

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    Frogg Toggs. I bought a set about 3 years ago. I just use the jacket and it takes very little room in my backpack and is light weight. I've probably used it at least 20 times and its still like brand new. I spent about $25 US on sale.
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  9. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer Supporter

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    El cheapo waterproofs from the Warehouse in NZ or the equivalent where you are. It's all you need and easy to carry.

    Those mesh chainsaw goggles are epic. No misting, no crap in the eyes. I highly recommend. (Got 2 pairs). Mad Max+

    Wet wipes are great if you end up soiling yourself.

    As you say wool socks are great. So are merino underlayers, warm when wet and don't smell. Cool when hot, too.

    Summit I have seen virtually no discussion of, anywhere, is how to cope when the clay locks the wheels up. We have an 80% clay / 20% gorilla glue terrain. You can't clear the tyres, regardless of tread pattern. It builds up in the brakes until they seize and will lock the rear wheel against the swing arm eventually. On a trials bike it will lock the front wheel against the mudguard in minutes. Any dirt bike looks like a Yamaha Big Wheel within 10 minutes. Carry tools to dismantle things and, believe it or not, a silicon kitchen spatula for pushing and clearing the crap away. Spanners and twigs are an exercise in frustration.

    Carry spare gloves. Once soiled they are awful.

    I like riding in the rain, makes it very technical.
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  10. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

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    I've found this solution quite effective for that kind of clay.

    [​IMG]
  11. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer Supporter

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    :DAnother great use for the wet wipes.
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  12. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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  13. Fluke

    Fluke Need to get back to dirt

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    I'm looking at a 2016 beta 300rr race edition. What is meant by sloppy tolerances in the front forks . Can a simple rebuild fix the problem or are the tubes or other hard parts out of spec ?
  14. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    a few threads discussing the issues in depth, fluke. just google "beta racing fork anodizing" "beta racing premature wear" and similar terms.
  15. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    traction erag had a recent article about the ermergence of chinese dirt bikes. will they soon be a viable budget alternative? and how soon before they get the quality control good enough to do so? i got to ride a chinese 450 in canada and thought they could be closer to making decent dirt bikes than we think....

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  16. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer Supporter

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    Both China and India will take bigger market shares in coming decades for the reasons you state. I have an aircooled 125cc Chinese motor in a bike. Based on a TT-R 125. 15'000kms in, it still does not dirty the oil between changes. I have abused it mercilessly. Runs like a dream. The motor is made in the millions and used throughout Asia, Middle East and South Asia.

    I have a mate down the road, home car mechanic, strictly cash. He specialises in hard to fix problems. Virtually all the replacement parts he sources - water pumps, alternators, electric motors - are from and made in China. They are better designed, cheaper and far more reliable than the OEM Japanese or European fitments. He knows exactly what to look for, though.
    It's just a matter of time before China and India become really big hitters with quality products and advanced technology.

    Korea has done this almost covertly, Kia and Hyundai make great cars. Just need to get more into bikes.... Hyosung ain't quite cutting it.
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  17. B1

    B1 Carbon-based bipedal

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    Sure the Hitler rant vids have been done to death, but I figured it was time to have a very dirt bike-specific one! If any Austrian, Italian or Japanese bike owners are upset remember to fill out the hurt feelings report in our complaints department video here lol.

  18. Todd157k

    Todd157k Long timer Supporter

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    A while back you did a video on Hill climbs. I had mentioned to you that it is very advisable to 'coast' over the crest of a hill climb because you never know what's up there, or on the other side. Last weekend I proved my own point. Skip to 5:18 and you'll see what I was talking about.

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  19. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

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    Yeah, I've been to a few places where they had really steep hillclimbs and the "top" is less than a bike length long and then its almost straight down the other side.
  20. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer Supporter

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    Indeed. A couple of weeks ago I lightly soiled myself riding over a 6ft mound in a confident fashion. We had had some heavy rain and the other side was washed out into a deep gut much to my surprise. Pretty much a straight drop into it. Sheer luck and a big handful of throttle got me across but I nearly looped the bike and really clattered the shock. The little rubber bump stop is AWOL.
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