Dirty 990 MOSFET Voltage Regulator/Rectifier Install

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by Bartron, May 17, 2015.

  1. Bartron

    Bartron 'Tenacious B' the Bike Punisher

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    788
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    Alberta
    Hey Guys,

    I promised a few of the fellas who helped me in this thread I would document my install. The bike is kinda dirty and my garage is a mess so apologies ahead of time. If i were to wait till both were clean, it would never happen.

    BACKGROUND

    2012 KTM 990. Last summer on the Oregon BDR I had a dead battery one morning in the middle of nowhere. Thanks to the InReach Communicator, my awesome wife and inmates here, I made it out of the bush in one piece.

    When I got back I swore to the missus and myself I would not let it happen again. So, plan was to figure out the problem, install a voltmeter and checkout battery and charging system.

    VOLTMETER:

    On the recommendation of an inmate, I installed a voltmeter from Datel. Live to the switched accessory line and ground to battery. It's about 0.5V lower than what the battery reads but it is consistent. It installs cleanly into the lighter socket space and I moved the socket up onto the dash.

    [​IMG]

    BATTERY:

    My dead battery was a stock Yuasa battery. The only battery I could find when out of the bush was a WPS (western power sports) LiFePO4 battery in Klamath Falls, OR. It got me home.

    Over the winter, I didn't bother to put the bike on a trickle (I know) but would start it for kicks every now and then with no problem. When installing the Rade headlight this spring, I ended up killing the battery simply by having the bike on a bit with the headlight on. Nothing crazy so obviously battery wasn't that hot to begin with.

    I looked around the forum to try and find the best battery possible. There are a few battery experts on here and the best suggestion I could find was an EarthX 24C battery with 24 Equivalent Amp Hours. For comparison, the WPS battery was rated for less than 5 amp hours. Plus, the EarthX batteries come equipped with battery management software for balancing cells and managing charging. Given the non-electronic charging of batteries that the bike does, I thought proper charging would best be manages with the BMS. The battery is only as good as its last charge.

    VOLTAGE REGULATOR/RECTIFIER:

    I evaluated mine as per Jack from Roadstercycle.com who was very helpful with everything. Basically, with the headlight on or off the best I could get was 13.6v at the battery terminals and no increase with increasing throttle to 5K.

    I cleaned and dielectrically greased all connections and got an improved 13.8v. Never did I see anything between 14-15V as the service manual suggests. Instead of assuming the system was ok, I figured I'd replace it with something better - enter the MOSFET idea.

    PARASITIC LEAK:

    I checked to see if there was a significant parasitic draw on the battery. By putting the multimeter into ammeter mode, You simply disconnect ground from battery and use the ammeter to link the battery to the bike ground cable. Doing this indicated my parasitic draw was around 1mA which is within spec.

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. Bartron

    Bartron 'Tenacious B' the Bike Punisher

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    788
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    Alberta
    Here's the play by play.

    BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING, DISCONNECT AND REMOVE THE BATTERY. I am not an electrical engineer and you are assuming all risk includinG financial, electrical, weather-related and acts of God.

    This is what my stock regulator looks like. Note the oil drain line from CJ Designs.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the WPS battery out of the battery tray. Note the little white connector to the rider's right of the battery tray.
    [​IMG]

    This white connector connects the positive terminal of the voltage regulator/rectifier (VRR).
    [​IMG]

    Follow the positive (red) wires that are PVC wrapped from the VRR and you should arrive at this connector. You can unplug it.
    [​IMG]

    Follow the yellow stator wires from the VRR. These connect to the stator which is the doohickey that the engine spins and makes AC electricity for your VRR to make the DC goodness for your battery.
    [​IMG]

    When I initially cleaned and regreased everything, I tucked the stator connection up over the VRR. Now we are disconnecting the VRR and going to undo the stator connector.
    [​IMG]

    Follow the green ground leads from the VRR under the bike and over to an engine case bolt which acts as the ground pole of the battery-boost setup. The positive pole is a brass bolt head covered with red rubber.
    [​IMG]

    Undo the bolt and slide off the ground lead. Don't forget to put the bolt back on.
    [​IMG]

    Take the VRR off.
    [​IMG]

    Your stock VRR should look like this. Quite possibly cleaner.
    [​IMG]

    I ordered the MOSFET FH020AA Super Kit with the maxifuse from Jack at www.roadstercycle.com
    The super kit is nice because it has all the connections already soldered and made. That can be a good or a bad thing. More on that later.

    Here are the main parts that came with the kit.
    VRR up top, stator connector in fashion yellow, battery leads on the left.
    [​IMG]

    On the VRR, the black connector is for positive and negative to battery (indicated by red and green stripes). The grey connector is for the stator wires.

    The connectors Jack uses are really nice. Here's how they break down.

    Connector looking at you.
    [​IMG]

    Pull out yellow plastic piece with needle-nose somethings.
    [​IMG]

    Then, if you use a very small electronics flat screwdriver, you can pop a tab inside the connector on top of the female lead and simultaneously push the lead out of the connector.
    [​IMG]

    Then you can pull the individual wires out if you want.
    [​IMG]

    Knowing this, if I had a set of connectors, I could have used the existing stator wires and installed them in the connector - saving a potential connection point failure.

    Time to connect the stator. Cut off the factory connector from the stator. I cut it right at the connector because it is easy to deal with extra wiring, much harder when you don't have enough. The stock is 14G and the yellow wires are 12G. Strip 1/4-3/8 of an inch from each end.
    [​IMG]

    I used some PVC shielding from the original VRR stator wires and cut it to size to fit the new connection. Then I applied the heat-shrink-wrapped butt connectors both to the VRR connector side...
    [​IMG]

    ...and the stator side and brought them together in matrimony using lots of squeezing and cig-lighter holding.
    [​IMG]

    Next feed the battery cables through/around the battery box. To fit through the frame parts, I removed the connector to pass the wires and reattached when through. Initially I routed through battery box, later, as you will see, I routed over the battery box.

    From inside the battery box
    [​IMG]

    Through the frame
    [​IMG]

    Put the connector back on
    [​IMG]

    Time to mount the VRR. You can mount either pointing up or down. I tried both and settled on the 'at attention' position. I figured I wanted to have access to the connectors even with the skid plate on.
    [​IMG]
    OR
    [​IMG]

    Connect up the connectors.
    [​IMG]

    Deal with excess wiring
    [​IMG]

    I ran the wiring by the CJ's oil drain.
    [​IMG]

    Dealing with the extra wiring in the battery box was the biggest PITA of the entire install. The maxifuse is huge. I'm not sure I see a need for such a giant fuse and honestly a smaller unit (perhaps the circuit breaker) may offer a better fit. Alternatively, if the fuse was further away from the positive terminal eyelet, it could be secured outside the battery box. After much wrestling with the battery box, battery and wiring, I ended up tucking the maxi-huge-ass-fuse over the battery box. I cut out little notches over the positive and ground terminals to enable the wires to leave the box cleanly to the fuse above it.
    [​IMG]

    We can't forget about this lonely fella.
    [​IMG]

    I smothered him in electrical tape and zip-tied him to something else.
    [​IMG]

    Now at idle I have 14.2V at the battery. Woo HOO!!

    Enjoy and good luck.
    #2
  3. zeropoint

    zeropoint Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2012
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    405
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    UK Wetlands
    Great write up and pics. Thanks.
    #3
  4. sonoran

    sonoran a treat especial Supporter

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    Nicely done but I'm not clear on why you disassembled the grey 3 wire connector?
    #4
  5. Bartron

    Bartron 'Tenacious B' the Bike Punisher

    Joined:
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    Two reasons:

    1. I was curious how they came apart

    2. If one were to get the regular non-pre-soldered kit, the potential is there to use a different connection setup. For example, you could wire as follows:

    VRR --> grey connector --> stock (VRR to OEM connector) wiring --> OEM wiring (OEM Connector to stator)

    OR

    VRR --> grey connector --> OEM wiring to stator
    #5
  6. sonoran

    sonoran a treat especial Supporter

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    Ah, thanks.

    Agreed that using the existing wire loom from the stator with the provided connector would be cleaner. Is the stock stator wiring long enough to accommodate it?
    #6
  7. Bartron

    Bartron 'Tenacious B' the Bike Punisher

    Joined:
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    I think mine would have been just long enough as long as connectors were mounted up. Can't quite say for sure.

    If you used the OEM connector and some wiring from the OEM loom you'd definitely have enough.

    Many ways to skin this cat.
    #7
  8. Tessier

    Tessier Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    280
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    [QUOTE

    Time to connect the stator. Cut off the factory connector from the stator. I cut it right at the connector because it is easy to deal with extra wiring, much harder when you don't have enough. The stock is 14G and the yellow wires are 12G. Strip 1/4-3/8 of an inch from each end.
    [​IMG]

    How do you know what pin 1 is from the start I don't want to cut off the connector with out knowing what the order of the wires from the stator to the R/R should be.
    #8
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  9. Bartron

    Bartron 'Tenacious B' the Bike Punisher

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    788
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    Alberta
    Great question. Short answer is it doesn't matter. Long answer is each is connected to one of the three induction loops in the stator and produces AC current. When you check your stator you check each wire to ground for impedance (should be roughly equal) and check the voltage across any of the two leads when the stator is running (should be roughly equal).

    Hope that helps.
    #9
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  10. Dru

    Dru Hardly an Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    587
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    Okay, I understand the stator wiring and battery connections but not the taping-up of the white plastic connector? Where does it go and why do we leave it on the bike if it's non-operative?
    #10
  11. DirtyADV

    DirtyADV Long timer

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    And a little warning about LiPoFe4 or other lithium batteries the modern smart tickle chargers might be really bad to use.

    Some have a desulfating phase and do a quick short circuit of the battery, not good for the lithium batteries.

    /Johan
    #11
  12. HellsAlien

    HellsAlien a has-been that never-was Supporter

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Taping it up and tucking it out of the way is the simplist way of dealing with it. Leaving the plug on means the terminals are robustly protected. Cutting off the plug means you have to protect the bare ends from shorting, vibration, wear without the nice protection offered by the existing connector. It gets hot and dirty down there, the adhesive on tape will slip over time. If that slipped off the bare end there could be a short.

    I suppose you could crimp a splice type connector on the ends and shrink-wrap it, just more messing around.
    #12
  13. Dru

    Dru Hardly an Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Gotcha, makes sense to me now. Thanks.
    #13
  14. PeterKaa

    PeterKaa Been here awhile

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    Copenhagen
    Thanks for the write up, looks like a solid job :-)

    Only comment, having the connectors pointing upwards, makes them more likely to get filled with water and dirt, rain will tend run that way :-)
    #14
  15. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

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    +1
    #15
  16. Whammo

    Whammo Nature's toothbrush

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    Had a helluva time with the connectors that came with the kit. The yellow wires were too big, and stator wires too small. Ended up using my own dopey connectors from a radio shack kit.
    #16
  17. Whammo

    Whammo Nature's toothbrush

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    Maybe I missed something, but I have no idea how the wires clear the tank, especially the lead from the battery which occupies almost the exact space as the fuel pickup & the petcock. Back to the garage for me to flip it 180.
    #17
  18. Rad Brad

    Rad Brad Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    I'm in the middle of my VRR install. I bought mine from Jack at http://www.roadstercycle.com/index.htm. I have a 2005 KTM 950 Adventure.

    I have the stator wires connected. I had to leave the original, inline connector so I would have enough 10g wire to hook up to the new VRR grey connector. Of course, I cleaned both connectors with a brush and mineral spirits, and then used my compressor to air dry. Pretty dirty.

    Reading the original post on the install on the 990, I think I'm good. But, I want to confirm that I can disregard the old, original, double-wire connector, and either dead-head it or tape it up. Then, connect the new positive and negative single wires directly to the battery.

    The original connection setup has a double-wire to the positive and negative (see photo). Is that just for redundancy? I'm concerned one of the positive wires powers another circuit. The owner's manual doesn't show where they're connected.

    Looking forward to finishing. It was exciting to hear Sparkles rumble on this winter afternoon after not running for a couple months. I keep it on a trickle charger. I had to use my handy, portable, BeatIt charger/jump-starter on the last couple of trips when it wouldn't start on cold mornings. Highly recommended device.

    Photo of old connector showing two-wire setup. Click to enlarge.

    Old KTM Regulator to Battery Connections.jpg
    #18
  19. Rad Brad

    Rad Brad Adventurer

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    Aug 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    #19
  20. Rad Brad

    Rad Brad Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Hi Brad, yes they are redundant. The old power plug gets taped off and hidden away, they do not power anything else, they end up at the battery the long way and are smaller gauge wire than in the kit. Please install the kit like I recommend in the directions and READ READ READ section. Also In the READ READ READ section it also explains about the 2 reds and 2 greens. Here’s a diagram of the install when you’re done. It’s really simple, try not to over think it. When your check the charging voltage at the battery with a good meter. You should get about 14.2 volts with a good stator and battery with the idle up a bit.

    Jack
    #20
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