Distance and Cost From San Diego to Ushuaia?

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by bananaman, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. dodgerdodger

    dodgerdodger Acountabilabuddy Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,473
    Location:
    Rocky Mountain HIGH
    I would imagine that horizons unlimited would have some folks that could help answer some of your questions.

    Jon
    #21
  2. gpothoven

    gpothoven whatever

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,130
    Location:
    Quito, Ecuador
    I seem to recall someone incredibly anal who kept an excel sheet of every single penny spent from the USA to TDF... will look for it.
    #22
  3. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    whatever you do, don't - ride - through - Colombia.
    #23
  4. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    when I lived there, I didn't ride, not even in Bogota. I know better.
    #24
  5. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    you are the big honcho, I am giving advice to mere mortals like me
    #25
  6. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    SAFETY AND SECURITY: Travel to Colombia can expose visitors to considerable risk. The Secretary of State has designated three Colombian groups – the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) – as Foreign Terrorist Organizations. These groups have carried out bombings and other attacks in and around major urban areas, including against civilian targets. Terrorist groups have also targeted critical infrastructure (e.g., water, oil, gas, and electricity), police and military facilities, public recreational areas, foreign-owned factories, and modes of transportation.
    During the past four years, kidnapping and other violent crimes have decreased markedly in most urban areas, including Bogotá, Medellin, Barranquilla, and Cartagena. The level of violence in Cali, Buenaventura, and the surrounding areas remains high, largely as a result of the illicit drug trade. Colombia continues to have a high rate of kidnapping for ransom. The FARC continues to hold hostage three U.S. government contractors – all U.S. citizens – who were captured in February 2003 when their small plane went down in a remote area of Colombia.
    Kidnap or murder victims in Colombia have included journalists, missionaries, scientists, human rights workers and businesspeople, as well as tourists and even small children. No one can be considered immune. Although the U.S. government places the highest priority on the safe recovery of American hostages, and the Colombian government has had some success with hostage-recovery teams, rescue capabilities are limited. Colombian law requires that private individuals coordinate efforts to free kidnap victims with the Colombian Office of Anti-Kidnapping (Ministerio de Defensa/Programa Para la Defensa de la Libertad Personal).
    Official and personal travel by U.S. Embassy employees outside of most urban areas is subject to strict limitations and reviewed case by case. U.S. Embassy employees are allowed to travel by air, but inter- and intra-city bus transportation is off-limits to them.
    The U.S. Embassy must approve in advance the official travel to Colombia of all U.S. government personnel. Such travel is approved only for essential business. Personal travel by U.S. military personnel to Colombia requires advance approval by the U.S. Embassy. Military personnel requesting permission for personal travel should contact the office of the Embassy’s Defense Attaché through the Embassy switchboard at 011-57-1-315-0811. Non-military employees of the U.S. Government do not need Embassy approval for private travel.
    For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s Internet web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Public Announcements, including the Worldwide Caution Public Announcement


    Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
    The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
    CRIME: Armed robbery and other violent crimes are common in major Colombian cities. Several recent robberies of American citizens have occurred after using automatic teller machines (ATMs) on the street. In some cases, robbers have used motorcycles to approach their victims and later flee the scene. American citizens are urged to use ATMs only during daylight hours and only inside shopping malls or other protected locations. Driving to and from the location – rather than walking – provides added protection. When using an ATM, you should be on the lookout for anyone who may be watching or following you. Generally speaking, if you are the victim of a robbery and not in fear of losing your life or of serious bodily harm, you should not resist. Robbery victims have sometimes been shot and killed while resisting.
    Robbery of people hailing taxis on the street is a particularly serious problem in Bogotá. Typically, the driver – who is one of the conspirators – will pick up the passenger, and then stop to pick up two or more armed cohorts, who enter the cab, overpower the passenger, and take his/her belongings. If the passenger has an ATM card, the perpetrators will often force the passenger to withdraw money from various ATM locations. Such ordeals can last for hours.
    In almost every case of taxi-related crime, the victims have been riding alone and have hailed their taxis off the street. Rather than hailing a taxi, you should take advantage of the telephone dispatch service most taxi companies offer. Many hotels, restaurants, and stores will call a taxi for you, and the taxis usually arrive within minutes. When a taxi is dispatched by telephone, the dispatcher creates a record of the call and the responding taxi. Additionally, the passenger receives a code from the dispatcher, which helps ensure that the correct taxi has arrived.
    The Embassy continues to receive reports of criminals using disabling drugs to temporarily incapacitate tourists and others. At bars, restaurants, and other public areas, perpetrators may offer tainted drinks, cigarettes, or gum. Typically, victims become disoriented or unconscious, and are thus vulnerable to robbery, sexual assault, and other crimes. Avoid leaving food or drinks unattended at a bar or restaurant, and be suspicious if a stranger offers you something to eat or drink.
    U.S. citizens in Bogotá routinely fall victim to a scam in which purported undercover police officers approach them on the street and request to examine their money or jewelry. The “officers,” who are in fact criminals, then flee with the person’s belongings. Legitimate Colombian police officers do not ask to examine money or jewelry.
    American citizens should be aware of the danger of traveling on inter-city and rural roads in Colombia, including on buses, due to the risk of kidnapping and other activity by criminal gangs. Buses within cities also present a risk of robbery and other crime. U.S. Government employees in Colombia are prohibited from taking buses anywhere in the country. They are also forbidden from driving outside most urban areas, and they cannot drive on roads outside of urban areas at night
    #26
  7. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    To those planning to travel to Honduras. this is what the State Department has to say:

    SAFETY AND SECURITY: Political demonstrations sometimes disrupt traffic, but they are generally announced in advance and are usually peaceful. Travelers should avoid areas where demonstrations are taking place, and they should stay informed by following the local news and consulting hotel personnel and tour guides. Demonstrators frequently block public roads, sometimes for many hours, in or to press for concessions from the Government of Honduras. The Government rarely seeks to disperse the demonstrators. U.S. citizens should never try to pass such roadblocks. While the Honduran side of the Honduras-Nicaragua border has been largely cleared of land mines, travelers should exercise caution there. For more information, we strongly encourage travelers to visit the U.S. Embassy's web site at http://honduras.usembassy.gov/ and click on Crime and Security Matters. For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s Internet web site where the current Travel Warnings and Public Announcements, including the Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, can be found.
    Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect them selves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A

    Don't believe that Honduras poses the same threat level as Colombia.

    I have extensively ridden though Honduras and found it to be very safe, if good sense is applied.
    #27
  8. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    Hey, guys- cool off on the ride/don't ride Colombia! It's just one country and we'll decide later if we're in the mood to ride it. I'm also Panamanian, remember? Me and my pillion rider are fluent in spanish and we understand the risks. The ride/don't ride decision process is the same for every country, every day.

    I also live in Wisconsin, and Wisconsin is generally a very safe place to ride, but that doesn't mean I'd ride parts of Milwaukee at night, or even parts of Madison at night. Illinois is pretty safe but I would NOT ride parts of Chicago. Colombia, as far as I know, has some known risks, but it also has some very beautiful scenery and some wonderful people. If we ride Colombia, part of the decision will be based on the current low tourist volume. We ride to get away from tourists.

    I found the post with the excel spreadsheet. It was very informative. I'll try to keep records as accurate as those and make them available.

    ps: save the name calling for jo mamma.
    #28
  9. santaferider

    santaferider The Argienaut

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,531
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM USA
    :photog
    #29
  10. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    I would very much like to thank everyone for taking the personal arguement to jo momma. And I would like to thank everyone for helpful information about the original question.
    #30
  11. gpothoven

    gpothoven whatever

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,130
    Location:
    Quito, Ecuador
    I thought the mods might have moved this out of Jomomma, as it wasn't a matter of if, but when this would happen. Hopefully they'll catch it and move it to somewhere where you may continue to get helpful suggestions.
    #31
  12. Aussie_Gringo

    Aussie_Gringo I have a "get out of banning for a week" card

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,372
    Location:
    Simi Valley, California
    #32
  13. MaddBrit

    MaddBrit Now officially a Yank.

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    Oddometer:
    28,240
    Location:
    Allen, Tejas. Blissful state...

    All pruned with the relevant posters permissions.

    Some good advice on this thread, so lets keep it civil in its new home.

    MB
    #33
  14. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,130
    Location:
    out and about
    Maintenance and 'expected' repairs will be by-mile, as will be fuel. That's pretty solid.

    Food and lodging is usually what makes budgets vary from one extreme to the other. The only limits/controls here are almost zero to ungodly. :D

    Vices, such as cigs and beer/alcohol, should be planned. A $.50 beer in one locale might be $2 in another.

    Know what your needs are, and that usually comes from experience after traveling for some time.

    You either already know what's important to you during a trip, or you will learn - sometimes very fast. Really, it's self-teaching.

    If you find yourself drifting away from your plan, maybe take a day or two off and think about it. The reasons, etc.
    #34
  15. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    The way I figure food is, WE HAVE TO EAT ANYWAY. I'll eat at home, or I'll eat on the road. I only consider extra food costs as legit trip expenses. That's just me.

    The way I figure lodging, well, that's just pure trip expense, unless I managed to lease my house or something. I've been vagabond on a bike before- no house to come home to, everything in storage- and that's just plain... wierd. For me, anyway. I'm too old to call my parents' house "home," and the houses in Panama- sure, I live there, but "home" is in Madison. Even when I was a kid and was going to school in Panama, "home" was still in Wisconsin. So "lodging" is an extra expense. We've got a few guide books- Lonely Planet and Lonley-Planet-Types of books. Lodging will vary from $20 to $100 ($100 will be splurging). Our plan right now is to vary the lodging in a sort of pattern. Like when I was backpacking Europe with a eurail pass. It was see a town/spend a night on a train/see a town/spend a night on a train/spend a night in a hostel (shower, sleep in a bed). Repeat for months and months. Now, older- we won't be just sleeping out, but we are prepared to camp. I'm not confident about camping in Central America, but I've heard there are places in Peru, Chile, and Argentina where camping will be safe.
    #35
  16. Aussie_Gringo

    Aussie_Gringo I have a "get out of banning for a week" card

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,372
    Location:
    Simi Valley, California
    Camping in these areas is available, but I averaged $20/night in hostels in the places mentioned. Then again, taking a tent is wise in the event of a breakdown in areas where you might see half a dozen vehicles in a day.
    #36
  17. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    What were the hostels like? Do you have a ride report we could look at? Any hostels to avoid?

    btw, I didn't realize that I'd originally posted my question in jo mamma. Oops.
    #37
  18. Aussie_Gringo

    Aussie_Gringo I have a "get out of banning for a week" card

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,372
    Location:
    Simi Valley, California
    No worries my friend....:freaky
    #38
  19. AndyT

    AndyT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Oddometer:
    891
    Location:
    Mimbres, NM, USA
    I posted this on my Horizons Unlimited blog on costs:

    "Since I took today off in Punta Arenas to enjoy being dry and warm for the first day in about the last 12 (it has rained at some point every day but one since I entered Chile the first time near Puerto Montt), I thought I would take a stab at seeing what this trip really cost me. I have not been doing any accounting as I go, but thanks to internet banking, and free wi-fi at the hostel I am at, I looked up my checking account activity. These are expenses since I crossed from the USA into Mexico back in July.
    Total withdrawn from checking accounts or paid on my credit cards: $7400
    Still have $400 cash on hand, leaves $7000 expended for 150 days.

    big ticket items:
    shipping bike, Panama to Bogota: $501
    shipping me, Panama to Bogota: $260
    Pair of motorcycling pants: $180
    3 tires: $280
    Fuel: $900
    Spanish lessons: $180
    Machu Picchu trip $130
    Camera/storage card/reader to $280
    replace the originalthat died
    Total: $2711
    That leaves $4569/150, or $28.59/day, that went into daily expenses, like lodging, food, beer, internet access, border crossings, oil and chain lube, mountain bike rental, laundry, whatever. I don't think there is too much fat in that $29/day figure, although I'm sure people have done similar trips on much less. Most days I had a private room, although there were probably 15 nights that I spent in shared room hostels, and probably another 25 where I had no cost, either camping out or staying at someone's home. I ate pretty good most of the time, usually 2 restaurant meals per day, and didn't skimp on the beer, which is surprisingly expensive in a lot of places. I can't think of anything I bought for the bike, other than oil and tires, so I was lucky in that respect. Without going to a lot of effort to pin it down exactly, I would guess I spent $20/day in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru and Bolivia, and maybe $30 in Colombia and Ecuador, and $40 in Mexico, Argentina and Chile. Panama, I only spent a couple days in, and most of my time in Costa Rica I had a free place to stay, so it's harder to estimate for them.
    Of course, I still have 2 or 3 weeks to go, and have to get home, which will be by far the most expensive part of the trip. I think I will get myself and the bike back home with a total trip cost of about $10k. I originally thought this would take $10-12k, so I was right on the money there."

    I had been on the road 5 months at the time I wrote that, I ended up spending another 4 weeks before I went home to the US. Total trip cost was about $11,500, including getting th bike and myself back home.


    Oh yeah, I put on about 19,000 miles from Texas to TdF and back up to BsAs.
    #39
  20. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    I wish I could take 6 months. But we can't. Unless I shipped my kids down for a while.
    #40