Do Anakee Wilds really not need airing down?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by Three Dawg, Dec 23, 2019.

  1. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    Used a TKC80 front Mitas E07+ rear on my recent trip to South America. Happy with this combo, lasted the 6000+ mile trip with no issues. Ran them at 36psi front and 40 rear (2 up) on the tarmac and around 30/36 on gravel. At road pressures the front was going all over the place on gravel but was great aired down.

    Trouble is, unless you know you're on tarmac or gravel for long stretches it can be tempting to leave the pressures alone because stopping and getting the compressor out is a PITA (for lazy me anyhow)

    So I was wondering, do Anakee Wilds REALLY work well on gravel etc without airing down as Michelin claim? Or is it a case of yeah, they're OK, but they work better aired down.

    Something that will probably go bang some time (that's not cloud on the summit), and my GS...:D

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  2. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

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    IMHO, it's all based on your skill level. I only air down when it's necessary to get out of a tricky situation; I don't air down prior to the situation and rely on my skill level first and foremost.

    BTW, this is not specific to the Anakee Wilds but every tire.
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  3. Bultaco206

    Bultaco206 Back-to-back motos suck Supporter

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    I’m not a GS owner, but I did run Wilds on a Rally Raided CB500X. I can speak from my own experience that they performed much better when left at a constant pressure. I found them very sketchy at lower pressures off-pavement. Also, the lean angles on wet pavement were amazing. At least for me.

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  4. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    Well yeah, but I suppose how hard you want to work - I have no doubt that reducing pressure makes for a better ride off road and the bike goes where I want it to more easily.
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  5. LittleWiggler

    LittleWiggler Been here awhile

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    The only time I air down my Wilds are in really slick mud. Otherwise I leave them at 32/36.

    IIRC the max air pressure on these are 36 or 38.
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  6. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    Yeah, I saw that the max pressure was less than 40, but I think that's however many KG at a given pressure - the manufacturer's recommended pressures are normally correct - ie 36/42 for the GS two up and loaded.
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  7. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

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    Nobody said anything about working harder...
    It's more about using the right tool for the job. In this case, it's setting up your motorcycle how you need it when you need it. Not before.

    You don't break out the winch before you're stuck...
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  8. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    On my bike with me (not an off road god, sadly) riding it I find it handles much better on gravel with the tyre pressures lowered. It's easier to ride and therefore I think it's OK to say I'm not working as hard. YMMV! :D

    As you say - setting up the bike for how you need it is important, but when the surface changes often during the day it is a nuisance you have to stop and change the pressures, which is what I have to do to get the result I want. If the manufacturer is to be believed, running the Wilds may reduce this need.
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  9. Black Label Mark

    Black Label Mark Adventurer Supporter

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    I run my Wilds at 36 Front and Rear on my GSA and have no issues in gravel. I also noticed that the tires are marked "Max Load at 36 psi".
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  10. Moshjack

    Moshjack Aprilia Dude

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    When I ran them at 32/36 they always felt “softer” over rocks/roots/gravel than the TKC80s. They started to feel too soft when I aired them down into the 20s. I was starting to worry about cutting one (which I did). After that I just ran that at normal pressure and they were awesome!
    Great grip on the street too, very confidence inspiring.
    #10
  11. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    Seems to agree with what Michelin say then.. I guess the only real way to findout is to try a set as everyone's perception of what works tyre-wise is different.
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  12. Myll

    Myll Been here awhile

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    My wilds felt terrible at higher pressures on any gravel. Especially the front. I just keep them at 34 to 36 psi for both street/gravel.

    I've always kept them at 34 to 36 psi, but one day I had slightly over aired them to I think 39/40. I had about 3 hours of tarmac ahead so I figured no big deal. Once I got in gravel it was noticable on the front. Next day I aired down to my usual pressure , and the front was more predictable
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  13. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    It always amazes me how big a difference small changes in pressure can make. Taking the TKC down to about 30 (difficult to be accurate really as the tyre is usually hot when you air down - I just take out 4 to 6 psi and hope for the best) makes it great on gravel and hideous in the twisties.
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  14. Chris S

    Chris S Been here awhile

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    As high as possible [to avoid overheating and pinch flats]
    As low as necessary [to provide secure traction on any given terrain]
    ... is my mantra wrt to tyre pressures.

    The great thing with 80/20 tyres like TKCs or Wilds (which I used on my last desert trip) is the more aggressive tread compared to an Anakee Adventure, for example, means you only need to drop them 15-20% for great results on dry, firm dirt.
    As TD just said: it's amazing the difference just a few lbs makes. TPMS really helps keep tabs.
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  15. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

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    Not a GS rider but I do use Anakee Wilds on my 1290SA T. That rear tire has a maximum load capacity at 36 psi, not a maximum pressure. I spoke with a Michelin rep at the Long Beach Motorcycle Show and he said that even with more pressure, the load capacity does not go up. So I run my 1290SA T rear at 36 psi mostly though KTM recommends 42 psi for the rear but that particular tire has never been spec'ed on a new 1290. Front at 35 psi mostly. I rode most of the CA BDR which had some longer sections of soft sand and for those, I was running 26 psi front / 28 psi rear. I could have maybe gotten away with a lower pressure but there are embedded rocks and I was nervous about rim damage. My buddy riding a 1200GS with Heidenaus was running 23 psi rear and got stuck several times in soft sand. Different bikes and different riders but still an interesting tidbit.
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  16. Black Label Mark

    Black Label Mark Adventurer Supporter

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    The Wilds are marketed as a 50/50 tire.
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  17. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    But even if max load rating is achieved at 36psi that wouldn't stop you going higher if it changed the way the tyre felt. I found on the road dropping the pressure on the Mitas E07+ I used on my last trip to 40 from the recommended 42 made for a surprising improvement in handling.

    Chris S: To be honest, 15 to 20 percent is about what I would drop anyway as I'm always 2 up on my heavy old 1100. I'm not really hearing conclusive evidence that a fully aired up Wild is as good steering or (importantly) comfortable (ride wise) as an aired down TKC.
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  18. Black Label Mark

    Black Label Mark Adventurer Supporter

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    I'm not a tire expert but doesn't the fact that the Wild is a radial tire the reason about not having to air it down? Since radial tires have fewer layers of body cords on the sidewall, the sidewalls allow the tire to flex more. This means the contact patch of the tire stays put on the ground a bit better, and the sidewall provides a lot more feedback to the rider. A radial also allows the sidewall and tread to work more independently of each other than a bias-ply tire permits. But a thinner sidewall and airing down a radial could have repercussions that a bias ply doesn't have to deal with.
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  19. Three Dawg

    Three Dawg Into Africa

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    Yeah, that's exactly it as I understand it. Radials apparently have a tougher tread area too (resistant to punctures) because the reinforcement is steel belts. But is the inherent softness of the radial sidewall enough?
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  20. Chris S

    Chris S Been here awhile

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    "The Wilds are marketed as a 50/50 tire."

    You are right. I should have clarified these designations are based on my own experience.
    #20