Do loud horns increase road rage?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by FormerUser241220, Nov 23, 2020.

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Do loud horns increase road rage?

  1. The louder the better.

    22 vote(s)
    43.1%
  2. Loudest is not loud enough.

    6 vote(s)
    11.8%
  3. Meep, meep is good enough for me.

    19 vote(s)
    37.3%
  4. Ding, ding is great when around pedestrians.

    4 vote(s)
    7.8%
  1. FormerUser241220

    FormerUser241220 Adventurer

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    I was wondering. Does loud "BAAARRRRRPPPPP!!!" increase the odds of road rage, both in the Barper and the Barped? And does lower "Meep, Meep", or "Ding, Ding", make everyone be on their best behaviour?
    What's your opinion. Cast your vote.
    #1
  2. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob Supporter

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    Every vehicle that I've put a big horn on - I never really got to use it. It's like they can sense my increased Horn Power! and shy away.
    #2
  3. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    ride so you do not need a horn. There are a lot of folks teetering on the edge, takes very little to push them over.

    You ARE on a motorcycle where getting hurt in a wreck is almost a given.

    Learned the hard way, I was chased for many miles. In an Astro van so no getting away. Cell phone and the sheriff to the rescue. The guy was higher than a kite. He took a plea, I was never even deposed.

    Rod
    #3
  4. Gone in 60

    Gone in 60 Been here awhile

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    I have never really used the horn on my motorcycle. In all my years of riding in traffic, I haven't had many incidents where I couldn't just move out of the way or go around someone getting in my space.

    When older cars were easier to find in junkyards, I had a little side business, pulling the quad-tone horns out of Cadillacs. I'd clean them up, build wiring harnesses with relays, and sell them in kits as replacements for meep-meep car horns. I put the last set I had on my wife's little Honda CRV, when she came home after a difficult commute with someone cutting her off.

    The four-horn Cadillac setup sounds beautiful, like a train. I've also had loud horns on bikes. What I've found is that it gets attention, but when a horn makes a sound that is incongruous with the vehicle it is coming out of, people tend to jump a bit, then look around to see where the noise is coming from. It doesn't make sense that such a loud noise would be coming from a motorcycle or a dumpy little Honda car.
    #4
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  5. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    I've been on some mission trips overseas and noted some things about horns.
    • In the USA, the horn is used for road rage, payback, etc.
    • In the Philippines, the horn is used to let others know you are there. The right of way is determined by the number of lug nuts you have. And while it may seem chaotic, they all know where they are going.
    • In Thailand, the horn is used very very rarely, even though their traffic is jam packed.
    • In both the Philippines and Thailand, there's no road rage.
    A loud horn...or a quiet one...really does no good for accident prevention. If you think otherwise, you are kidding yourself. For the horn to work,
    1. You have to recognize the hazard ahead.
    2. You push the horn button, and wait for the other driver to react. That may or may not happen. Will they realize you are honking at them? Will they have the music playing louder than your horn? There's a lot of uncertainty in this step, and no guarantees.
    3. If...they recognize that the horn is about them, they then also have to recognize the hazard.
    4. They have to take evasive action...which may or may not be what you were anticipating.
    5. And hopefully, you both have not hit each other.
    If they got to step 3. If they only got to step 2, you now have considerably less time to take evasive action. What was once just a case of slowing down, or moving into another lane...is now a panic maneuver. One that you could've avoided altogether.

    Chris
    #5
  6. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    As a city P&D driver, I use a air or city horn fairly often when backing or to alert drivers I'm going to use more room than they expect. I also use it once in a great while when riding when someone is showing signs of being distracted.
    Over the years I've had a few people flip me off, many simply ignore it, and one time not heard by a hearing impaired driver who bumped me when they changed lanes into me where I had no out to the front, back, or side.

    I think they have their use, can be used safely, so I practice using it, and cover it like one would the brakes, clutch or throttle when I feel the need.
    #6
  7. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I ride as invisibly as I can. I've rarely if ever used the horn in any manner to get attention. I only use the horn as a friendly beep beep to say thank you for letting me pass along with a wave. I feel that stock horns are friendlier sounding so I never bother to swap them out. For the way I ride, if I'm needing a loud horn, then there is something wrong with how I'm riding. Those oh shit moments that have occurred on occasion..... I'm not thinking of mashing the horn button.
    #7
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  8. Traxx

    Traxx Taxation is Theft Supporter

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    Naaaaa, you’re road raging. LOL

    I used mine twice today to alert the driver in front of me that the light had changed so they could put down the phone and move along. No rage, just a quick honk.
    #8
  9. macuaig

    macuaig Back in the Saddle

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    Yep, I think for anybody, if you’re blasting a horn to yell instead of acting to decrease the danger, you’re reaching for the wrong device. I’m certainly guilty of using my horn to bitch at somebody, but more and more I tend to think of other drivers as I would the weather, or a deer or other animals on their own consciousness adventure. It’s part of the landscape, and if you linger on this one you’re not ready for the next.
    #9
  10. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    At no time could you use your brakes or let off on the gas? Wow!

    Chris
    #10
  11. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I was in the left lane of 2 right turn lanes, and had only gone maybe 50 feet after departing the light, all vehicles were still bunched up from the stop. Car in front, car in back, car to the right, and barrier to the left. Having a sidecar prevented me from a lane split escape, or changing lane position.

    Saw the reflection on the wet pavement of her signal come on and her start to come over, hit the horn and brake a split second before contact. Not hitting the horn wouldn't have changed the outcome.

    Not having the cat like reflexes of the typical ADV member put me at some disadvantage too.
    #11
  12. Vertical C

    Vertical C Long timer

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    Horn has put me in more dangerous situations than got me out overall. Thats with stock horns.

    People use them as fuck yous so road ragers get pissed off if you use them even if you didn't mean it like that
    #12
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  13. GreyThumper

    GreyThumper Long timer

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    I installed a loud horn on one of my bikes a couple years ago, but to be honest I'm not much of a horn user, and haven't done it with my newest bike. Given a split second, I'd rather have control and react immediately instead of hitting the horn and hoping the other person hears, identifies where the sound is coming from, comprehends the situation, then reacts appropriately.
    #13
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  14. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob Supporter

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    I had an R100RS with the big twin Fiamm horns, stock. It sounded like a Buick.

    Every time I honked that horn, my wife would jump and look behind us for the Buick.
    #14
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  15. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Think for yourself

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    Rarely use my horn but when I do it's usually because the person in front of me at a light just sits when the light turns green. And then I do a quick tap on the button.
    #15
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  16. Berchunis

    Berchunis Been here awhile

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    Stock horns on my GW and my older BMW were loud and used many times to alert sleepy Joe/Suzie to put down the cell phone and drive.

    Road rage? I never had that problem.
    #16
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  17. Gone in 60

    Gone in 60 Been here awhile

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    Used mine this morning, actually. Reminded me that the only time I really use it is for a "Hey dumbass, the light is green, put your phone away and drive" notification.

    Looking back to the '30s and '40s, lots of luxury cars like Packards, Cadillacs, etc had two horns - "City" and "Country". The city horn was a bit quieter for the "Hey Dumbass" function, and the country horn was louder for the "Hey cows, get off of the road" function.
    #17
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  18. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    There’s a difference between laying on the horn, and tootling the horn. The response is different as well.
    #18
  19. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    I used my horn to give someone sitting on a green light a short "beep" once last year. They seemed to take it in stride. It always takes me minute to find the button on the bike or the right place to push on the steering wheel if in the truck. I don't use it enough to remember I reckon.
    #19
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  20. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    A toot of the horn is reasonable. Thing is some people think laying on it for long periods makes the other driver shrivel up, but in actuality it pisses them off. I understand if someone gives me a short beep if I am starting to cut them off (in my blind spot), I then realize and deal with my error or wave rather sheepishly at them acknowledging I screwed up and was glad they were watching for my screw up. It pisses me off when they lay on the horn for overly prolonged periods.

    I would venture to guess most who see a horn as a weapon to embarrass someone are probably jerk drivers who think they own the road. In most cases the situation isn't even close and they're on the horn as if the world was going to end. I am sure they are regular users too.

    I doubt if I use my horn on my vehicles more than a couple dozen times a year for a defense mechanism. Usually it is a toot and a wave to let someone in to traffic. Even when I use it, it is usually a brief toot to let someone know they screwed up, I am here, but I was looking out for them. My looking out for others has made it so I haven't had a close call of any sort in years. My horn blasts are short. No need to act and look like some road hog. A brief beep to let you know you are infringing on my territory is sufficient. If they didn't intend to do so they will back off or wave in apology. If they did whatever intentionally no length of horn blowing will matter to them, they will likely flip you off or ignore you.
    #20
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