Downsizing To A Garagedominium !

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by dlrides, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection

    The doors are 10 ft wide and the building is 28 ft deep ! My current shop has the same, and the sizing is perfect.
    #41
  2. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    7,344
    Location:
    Orygun
    Yup. It is just me myself and I - has been for decades (I am a lot happier now than when I was married).

    So I figure that if I have a place for my projects, guns, bikes and vehicles, and it is warm enough to work on the projects and to store my preps without them freezing, then that is all I really need - especially since I plan to be gone 6+ months of the year.

    I am thinking also that a greenhouse lean-to along the front of the shop would be nice, and would keep the shop warmer. I was planning on the back and possibly the sides of the shop being ICF and earth bermed.
    #42
  3. gmiguy

    gmiguy You rode a what to where?

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,778
    Location:
    Western NC
    I've explored this concept several times, as the concept of a small living space and large vehicle space is inherently appealing.

    Every time I've done the leg work to get prices and floorplans I've come to the conclusion that (for my area and application) it's better to build a conventional house that also has an exceedingly large garage/workshop, even for a single person. The additional costs are comparatively small, the added utility is significant, and the resale market is much broader.

    I'm sure there are cases where garage living is the most efficient option, but I'd expect that many others have considered it and then opted for a more typical setup after comparing both options.
    #43
    CharlestonADV and greenohawk69 like this.
  4. Gillus

    Gillus High Desert Rat Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,315
    Location:
    Alamogordo, NM
    +1, when we built a shop/garage hooked to our house the door was '10 wide and 16' inside. Park a motorcycle/workbench/toobox etc along the wall, the vehicle door or workaround space is always a foot short on each side :baldy. Take some masking tape or chalk on a cement pad or parking lot somewhere and fit what you are thinking along the wall and give it a try.
    I have a '10 door on each end as a drive thru or flow thru, awesome in nice weather .
    If I spray paint or grind/weld we do get some odors inside the house. I would separate the two next time with a breezeway. But it is handy having tools close if you need something in the house.
    #44
  5. r60man

    r60man Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,134
    Location:
    Centralish PA
    One thing that you may want to think about down the road is resale value. Had a neighbor that built his home, essentially a garage with a small single story home attached. Driving by it looked like a fire house, huge doors for the bus sized RV's and trailer. All kinds of other toys too. Then his business failed and he had to sell. The house took 3 years to sell, at way less than it cost to build.

    Another neighbor built a small single floor house and then a separate pole building. Pole building is 30' X50' has windows, lifts and bay doors. He decided to move and it sold before they put the for sale sign up. Just a thought.
    #45
    ryder1 likes this.
  6. scottcolbath

    scottcolbath Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Oddometer:
    11,600
    Location:
    Phoenix, Az.
    That is pretty much my single guy dream house. But the GF and I are looking for a place now, and it MUST have a three car garage. And we don't need much more living space than you have in the plans. Christ, maybe we should just buy a plot of land and build our own.

    BTW, where are you building this?

    S.C.
    #46
  7. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection

    Resale is not a factor for me, this is my final home. I’ve struggled and worked my whole life to have some nice things I enjoy and live debt free before retirement. It’s time to build what I want to live in, not what Blair and Buffy want for their little prince and princess down the road.

    Nor am I bound by some vagina carrier wanting to impress her friends.Once one discovers they all have one, and most are willing to throw it at you like a frisbee, one can live free of those bounds.

    :photog
    #47
  8. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection
    Rural NC, near the metropolis of Catawba.

    :lol3
    #48
  9. Chuck Pryce

    Chuck Pryce Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    542
    Location:
    western n.c.
    If the property allows, its nice to have a pull through bay.
    #49
    ozmoses and StevieMac like this.
  10. r60man

    r60man Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,134
    Location:
    Centralish PA
    So you will be living forever then? Good for you. Someone will need to sell it one day if that plan falls through.
    #50
  11. Killacurb

    Killacurb Dad

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,121
    Location:
    PDX
    Or just move in and take over all those nice toys in the garage! :evil
    #51
  12. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    7,344
    Location:
    Orygun
    Agreed. My retirement property will be inherited by my daughter in about 20 years if my parents generation lifetime is any indicator.

    That said, there is no reason that any buyer cannot build their own house in addition to the shop with living quarters.

    Rural property around here goes for about $20-$30K per acre and a shop with living quarters allows a prospective buyer to move in and build their dream house without having to own two properties or rent while the house is built.

    It is as much about location as what is built on it too. Where I am at now is prime location for people who want (or have) to work in the greater Portland area, but still live rural. Ditto for retired people.

    Me, in general, I don't like to be around most people - the more isolated I am from the human race, the happier I am. As long as I am within an hour or two of my daughter in case she needs me, I am fine with being a hermit on a mountain.
    #52
  13. jkam

    jkam Nomadic Man

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2001
    Oddometer:
    9,129
    Location:
    Somewhere out there
    I'd make one of the big garages drive through. Door on both ends.
    Otherwise, carry on.
    #53
  14. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Oddometer:
    7,344
    Location:
    Orygun
    To be clear, where I live now, the first owner built a shop, then put a small single wide mobile home on the property. The owners I bought it from came in an removed the single wide and put a customer triple wide on the property. I already have prospective buyers lined up who want the property - probably to live in the triple wide while they build something new. My neighbor said he thought of doing just that but decided it was too expensive and bought the property across the road with a house on it.

    Location and the right buyer in a hot market will sell most properties.

    [​IMG]
    #54
    dlrides likes this.
  15. k7

    k7 Almost retired..tick..tick..

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,762
    Location:
    Aridzona
    Pretty cool man. Good luck with your project.

    Once we’re ready to build our retirement home, I’ll have something like this built first:

    629A7714-70B0-486A-AC91-719C9E3A605E.jpeg

    When it’s completed, the well has been drilled and powered has been pulled to the site, Parker and I will likely pack up and move there, living (mostly) in the shop while the house is under construction to keep an eye on things. My buddy lives a mile away and he has a cabin that he’s offered but his kids visit a lot and they usually stay in the cabin. I don’t want to inconvenience them!

    Man plans, God laughs.
    #55
    CodeMonkee likes this.
  16. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection
    Make the shop larger with designed living space, and skip the the house construction !
    #56
  17. k7

    k7 Almost retired..tick..tick..

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,762
    Location:
    Aridzona
    How are you still single?

    :lol2

    I like the look of this home. If one of my schemes pays off in 5-7 years, I’d like to build a proper garage.

    PS: Subscribed

    :lurk
    #57
    dlrides likes this.
  18. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection
    Amazing isn’t it ?


    :imaposer
    #58
    k7 likes this.
  19. gmiguy

    gmiguy You rode a what to where?

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,778
    Location:
    Western NC
    Other than (possibly) slightly lower construction costs, what's the overriding advantage to living in a garage vs the more typical setup of a small conventional house plus large garage?

    Every time I've considered this question I've found the latter setup to be more efficient, but it's always just been a paper exercise so I may well have been missing something in the comparison.

    Is part of the appeal the lifestyle aspect of just wanting to live in a garage for its own sake? That's fine if that's the case, but I'm curious if there's a practical aspect here that I've overlooked.
    #59
  20. dlrides

    dlrides 1:1.618 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,433
    Location:
    Cranial Perfection
    I want to open a door and be in the garage, it’s where I spend most of my time. Much more efficient heating one structure vs two, and the construction costs is more than “slightly” lower.

    Most homes are now are built with two car garage, this is exactly the same with a square footage reversal. Applying the above, why aren’t they built separate ?

    To reverse the question, why build them separate? How is two more structures efficient ? How is two structures more practical than one?
    #60
    imnothng likes this.