DR350 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by leonphelps, May 16, 2007.

  1. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    You can not get 100% throttle pull with th e S/SE throttle tube. The dirt throttle tube is different. If you shave the stops you can get 90ish%.
  2. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    My GTS1000 had a low oil level lamp. Scared the crap out of me the first time it came on when I had been cruising at 110+ for about 50 miles. Turns out when the oil gets lowish and you are at high rpm, the oil begins to froth and you get a false warning. Backed off 10mph and it went out.
  3. turboguzzi

    turboguzzi Casual rooster

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    brilliant idea! from the school of keep it simple....problem is some people will forget to even look at that clear tube...
  4. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    Thanks for the feedback. I heard back from Mikunioz and they didn't mention the throttle tube being a limitation on the SE, but suggested adjusting the push cable first, then the pull cable. I might try that sometime and provide the outcome. However, I can believe that the SE throttle tube is not going to be as aggressive as a dirt model and might be a limiting factor. I'm shy of the stock stops now, so shaving anything off the stops won't really gain me anything. But it sounds like you're saying even if you hit the stops, it's still not a fully open throttle. I don't think I need to be up there as I'm not racing or anything. If I could even go from stop to stop I'd be happy. But I'm actually happy with it only going 80% right now based on my style of riding. I might end up just leaving it in favour of other work I'd like to get done on the bike.

    I'm completing a fan kit mod on my custom oil cooler right now using a Trail Tech controller and sensor with a 3" IP67 waterproof and dustproof fan with dual ball bearings. Prototyping it right now, but it seems to operate as expected. Just not sure how well it might help cools things down yet. It's interesting to see the temp changes as I'm riding around though. (The temp reading on the dash-addition pic isn't showing temp yet as that pic was taken before the sensor was hooked up.) The red LED in the center of the dash addition pic is the oil pressure light.

    Attached Files:

    brownvv and law1200 like this.
  5. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    On the DR350se with a Clarke tank, I wouldn't be able to see the tube easily as the fuel tank covers up a lot of the oil tank surface. But I agree, it's a simple but brilliant idea if there is an area that's viewable.
  6. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    Oooh, I like the oil cooler! Mind taking pictures/giving details as to how it's plumbed? I'd like to add a small one, but they're all "universal," and I'd prefer not to ruin my existing lines if I don't have to.

    Oh, almost forgot! Scored this on eBay last Friday for not a lot-o-moolah!

    IMG_4920.PNG IMG_4921.PNG

    According to the seller: 1990 DR350 bottom end. Looks mostly there (no clutch cover, clutch assembly, or oil pump drive gear), and no balancer blasted through the front (which is likely not an issue with an older one anyway, right?). Cases appear to be in better shape than my 250 cases, and seller says crank turns smoothly. Only problem he knows of: shifting problems, which could be something super-simple (or something catastrophic, time will tell). Should be waiting for me when I get home from work next Tuesday! Very exciting! Maybe the 250 will get a winter engine upgrade? Just need a jug (easy) and a head (not so easy).
  7. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    I'd be glad to, but this is a "universal" cooler and I had to cut the existing OEM oil lines to make it work. The space is really limited and I tried numerous combinations until I came up with this one. It required drilling out and tapping the inlet/outlet on the cooler with a pipe thread (tapered) so I could make some fittings work. Finding fittings was one of the most frustrating aspects of the job. Then I had to run the stainless braided lines opposite to how it would normally be connected . . . out of the bottom of the engine into the top of the cooler, then out of the bottom of the cooler up into the oil tank. I cut the stock hoses off and re-used the pipe/connector sections on the lines. I had to flare the ends of the pipe too so it would seal better and not work it's way off. That was a challenge due to the thickness of the steel. I could have used non-stainless braided, but besides the extra strength, I thought it might look cool. Then I had to mess with the mounting bracket to get it placed just right without the hoses interfering. Took two tries of the bracket until I got it to work and there are still little things that could have been better.

    If a cooler was available that had the OEM style connectors, it would have been a breeze if you could find the OEM lines that were for the cooler. But all that stuff is long gone from suppliers. So you have to get creative and take some risks.
  8. turboguzzi

    turboguzzi Casual rooster

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    Just of curiosity, you live in Canada but nevertheless have oil temp issues?
    Asking because although it was twenty years ago, i clearly remember plenty of day long desert rides on DRs in +100 temps and no issues whatsoever in the Middle East region.
    Nowadays i live in northern italy, here high oil temp is not even an issue.
  9. thump!

    thump! Adventurer

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    You might be surprised. Since the stock machine has no oil temperature gauge, we tend to ride in blissful ignorance. High oil temperatures can occur anywhere when moving slowly. Stop and go city traffic, long slow climbs in 1st gear and the like. I added a fan to the cooler on my DR650 after seeing 300+ F oil temperatures under these conditions on several occasions. FWIW, I first tried a computer cooling fan like the one used by the OP. It didn't move enough air to have much effect and eventually warped beyond use from heat exposure. Those little fans are designed for much lower temperatures than they will see in this application. I ended up buying a SPAL 4" puller fan which works great. It moves a LOT of air and is tolerant of the oil cooler / cylinder proximity temperatures.

    Idling - the SPAL was switched on at the 17 second mark.
  10. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Those SPAL's are bad ass, I have one on my 2 stroke.
  11. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    As "Thump!" points out . . . overheating isn't just a matter of ambient air temperature. One person on this thread quite a while back showed a temp of 140 C on his analogue oil-dipstick temp gauge, which is 284 F after a long uphill climb. Here in western Canada and the US there are lots of those! Could have been even higher because 140 C was the max the needle could go. I also go to Moab, Utah where the ambient temps are in the 100 F range and recently did the WABDR which was 650 miles of slow long up and down riding in sunny warm temps through desert like conditions for almost half of it.

    Overheating is harmful to engines, even if it doesn't cause them to fail at the time they overheat. A cooler was an option on the DR350 and I believe it's standard now on the DR650, R1200GS (pre WC), etc. So it's obviously something the manufacturers think is necessary. Is it absolutely necessary? . . . Maybe not if the type of riding , the ambient air temps and terrain aren't that demanding. But I'd rather have the insurance of having tried to do something to help keep the temps down. Not everyone would go to the extent I did, but my friends don't call me "The Fearless Mechanic" for nothing. :) I also run synthetic to help with the heat.

    @thump! . . . thanks for the confirmation re the fan. I'll give this one a shot for a bit and although it is the best I could find for the job, I suspected even after the first run that it's not going to pull enough air. I could add two (if it doesn't fail due to the heat), but even doubling the CFM that's only 88 cfm comparted to 124 cfm of a SPAL. I'm wanting to make a cooler guard anyway, so I'll probably do that and design it so I can mount a 4" SPAL fan on the guard. The cooler is only 3" wide, so bolting a 4" wide SPAL it on the cooler alone would look kind of dumb. But a guard would widen things in that area anyway and it would probably look more appropriate . . . Two birds with one stone. :photog
  12. dbarale

    dbarale Squiddly slow

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    I posted some passenger pegs and factory mudguard/tag light/bracket in the flea market section. Please let me know if my pricing is off.
  13. hellotimmutton

    hellotimmutton Been here awhile

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    At the stage of my engine disassembly where I need to split the case. A proper case splitter costs >=$124 (why is australia so expensive for everything?), but Ive seen some people suggest a harmonic balancer puller ($20) can get the job done, just wondering if anyone heres done that and how it worked out
  14. everready

    everready Stuck in Ohio....Ugh!!!

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    https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/...tm_term=description&utm_content=youtubevideos

    Not exactly cheap but better than $124.00.
    If you're handy you could probably make one. There are quite a few videos on YT.
  15. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    A case splitter is an awesome tool.to have, if you're likely to split cases more than once per year. If not cases can be split with elbow grease, patience, and a rubber mallet, which is much less expensive. Just don't get tempted to shove a screwdriver in there and pry, you'll likely ruin.the mating surfaces. Best of luck!
  16. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Are there pry points on the case. A section that has built up material intended for a screw driver. I recall seeing a pry point somewhere on the bike before. The head? Rocker cover?
  17. plugeye

    plugeye MC rescue

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    me too. clutch cover?
  18. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    Built up spots, yes. That's where I hit the cases with the mallet. Pry points I do not remember being there. Between the built up spots on the cases, and smacking the shafts while pulling on the cases, my 250 came apart pretty easily. Not as easily as with my new Tusk splitter, but pretty easily.
  19. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    I split my cases with elbow grease...can’t remember if I used a rubber mallet or not but I’m sure one was probably involved. I believe I used multiple plastic and/or wood wedges carefully placed where the cases had thick material once I got a bit of a split going. I’d tap them only a small bit at a time going around all of them. I think how I got the initial split going was to wedge inside the case well enough below the rim of the head surface as to not damage that surface or crack or chip anything on the case. I went very slowly, gently and carefully throughout the process, never forcing it. If something seemed too stuck, I stopped, reassessed and was prepared to stop entirely if I needed to.

    But as previously suggested, check online for DIY case splitter ideas. I just bought a spare DR350SE bottom end to build a spare engine to keep on the shelf and I’ll probably go the DIY splitter way when I get to working on it.
  20. hellotimmutton

    hellotimmutton Been here awhile

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