DR350 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by leonphelps, May 16, 2007.

  1. brianpeck

    brianpeck Been here awhile

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    I used a hacksaw to cut through the silver metal parts just enough to pull them and the hoses off the black metal pieces. You’ll find a hose barb underneath, you can replace the hoses with appropriate tubing that can handle hot oil and hose clamps. Mr. Bender has more info: http://www.thisoldtractor.com/dr350_oil_hose_replacement.html
    abraham_lincoln and Greg Bender like this.
  2. mwitt08

    mwitt08 Adventurer

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    Just tried my first side. Didn’t turn out terrible. 1/2” emt and a conduit bender.

    IMG_0827.jpg
  3. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Adventurer

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    I'd be lying to say I wouldn't be a little nervous about hacksawing my oil lines. I think I'm going to try a layer of hondabond to make sure that's the actual source of the leak, and if confirmed I'll go forward with replacing the line. I'm assuming oil will pour out of the lines when removed? Or could I tip the bike on it's side to avoid losing oil? Just did an oil change and probably only has ~40 miles on it so far

    Although I did find a replacement of the whole oil line setup for like $20 on Ebay but that could come with leaks of it's own so I'll rather diy I suppose

    That looks really clean! I can only imagine getting things to line up wouldn't be as easy as one might think. Seems like it'd be a lot of fun making a rack though, would be cool to have a little basket tucked away that can hold a small gas & oil container. Or maybe a section to mount a chainsaw or rifle. I would probably end up getting a little carried away lol
  4. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    I've tried a few sprocket combinations and I swap between 13T and 16T front and stock 41T on the rear, period, full stop. Yes, you need to make the chain a bit longer so you can just change the front sprocket and rear wheel position, but it lets you keep the stock chain guides/guards. A bigger rear sprocket can cause issues with the rear lower guard, plus the chain length might not work with other sprockets. I tried a larger rear sprocket and while it was good for off road, it sucked on pavement and limited me too much. The 13T gave me pretty much the same ratio, so the combo mentioned above gives me the most flexibility with just two sizes. I can count the chain links for you if you are interested in the same setup. I fabricated a keeper for the 16T sprocket with an indent in it to stay away from a bolt boss on the cover and let it be a bit thicker otherwise. I'm using the stock keeper for the 13T, but will probably make a custom one for that soon too. I could send along some instructions and pics if you're interested.

    The 16T is really great for around town and on the highway. I took the 13T with me on a recent trip for the WABDR and ended up not using it. For that ride the 16T worked fine even in the tough stuff. But if it was more technical, I'd have swapped in the 13T. On the highway sections getting to the start of the WABDR and back home afterward with the 16T it was no problem and enjoyable. I used the 13T in MOAB and it was frickin' awesome! The DR was like a mountain goat at times. So for me, those two sizes are all I need. Keep in mind I have the 441 BB and pumper carb, but I think that same sprocket combo would be fine for a stock machine too. (I rode mine stock for a couple of years before the upgrades.)

    As to gauges, I prefer the retro look of the old analogue speedo/tach and it was one of the factors that drew me to this bike. Call me old fashioned, but for dual sports it was one of the most attractive gauge sets to me for around that time. Even better than the DR650 IMHO. I've since tilted the light cover forward about an inch and put in a metal console adaptation with digital Temp and Volt meters, along with the oil pressure LED. But there are lots of cool features out there now for digital gauges and Trail Tech seems to be a leader in that space.

    BTW are you sure the tach and speedo are actually broken? Could the tach be due to a wiring issue? Might it need a new speedo cable? My speedo cable broke on the WABDR trip (thankful for the GPS as backup). I just recently replaced it and my speedo is now steady and working great, whereas before it was "pulsing" at times. Pull both ends of the cable and see if there is any drag at all. It should spin easily and smoothly. A new Motion Pro speedo cable is not that much money. But make sure the tach can be verified before spending money on a cable. That is unless you want to go Digital anyway, then I guess it's all moot.
    abraham_lincoln likes this.
  5. brianpeck

    brianpeck Been here awhile

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    Even if you get replacement oil lines, you're going to want to drain the bike to do the swap. If your oil is fresh, you can always just drain into a clean container and reuse it.

    Cutting off the old ones is slightly intimidating, but it's an easy job. When I bought my bike, pretty much all my oil lines were weeping oil. Slowly, but I'd get drips on the garage floor after long rides and I wasn't a fan of that. So after finding Greg Bender's site, I decided to go for it - it was one of the first things I ever did wrenching on a motorcycle, period, but once I got going it was easy.

    CAE31FBC-4E72-4275-8850-64529B4702C7.JPG
    Here's a pic just for fun, from about a month ago on a ride in the hills above Santa Barbara
  6. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    Welcome! . . . I wanted to say I applaud you for keeping on riding. In 2008 an acquaintance of mine, Bob Harrison, died at 84 and he was still riding the day prior. (He passed peacefully in his garden.) He track raced in England as a young man and rode pretty much every day he could right to the end. He was very inspiring and his life story very interesting. He rode a lot of old British bikes, but a friend helped him realize that at some point he needed to get back to something light and easy to ride to keep going. On that friends advice, his choice was a Yamaha TDR 250, which is close in weight to the DR. His example said to me that if I want to ride to the end too, I'll need to pick a bike and the DR350se was just right.

    Bob on TDR.jpg Bob on his TDR

    So yes, I am "improving" my DR, but it's more like "modernizing" it. Plus, I'm a consummate "feddler" like many inmates here and we do it as much for fun, curiosity and learning as much as anything. The 441 piston and a pumper carb really made the decision easy for me as it transformed the bike quite a bit. But yes, the stock bike is still powerful, mostly bullet-proof and well behaved. For me, this is my last bike, (meaning it will be the only one I have once I reach a certain point), so I'm putting money into it now to make it a comfortable Adventure Touring/Camping bike as well as a good "hooligan" bike for around town. I'm hoping to keep it going for the next 20 years, so I'm stocking up on consumables and replacement parts before things start to become rare.

    I'm 63 and intend on riding as long as possible. I watched a video a while ago that I wish I could find again. It was a short documentary on a small group of off-road riders in their mid-to-late 70's. They were having a hoot and doing some pretty challenging stuff. Their secret was to never let go of that feeling you get when you ride, adjust your riding style as you age, all the gear all the time, and make sure you're doing some form of exercise, stretching and physical activity every single day. Very inspiring. . . . So welcome to the craziness of the 3,000+ thread. :loco
    Boblosi111 likes this.
  7. plugeye

    plugeye MC rescue

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    [​IMG]
    as mr. pulldown said, taller primary raises gearing 12%. carry a 13t & 15t, chain will be perfect for road riding & on the loose side for off-roading. i have this set for sale.

    no need for any instruments really beyond an odometer for gas gauge, since the motor is happy in the higher revs & protected by a rev limiter.
    only reason i added a dr650 speedometer was for gas gauge with the big gas tank
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  8. plugeye

    plugeye MC rescue

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    looks good. what forks are those?
    i can understnd how it will run without a battery, but you'll have to push start or add a kickstart.
  9. TheGooderPlayer

    TheGooderPlayer n00b

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    This is an awesome thread you guys have here! I recently purchased my first bike, a 1997 DR350SE that dropped a valve. I'm now doing a full engine rebuild. Luckily, things haven't been too bad so far. I did have a question about one of the crankcase bearings though and was hoping you guys could give me some input. The ball bearing right in behind the front sprocket on the transmission shaft. It's sealed towards the sprocket and open on the other side. Should that be tough to turn? It turns smooth, but you have to really grab a hold of the inner race and twist to turn it. I tried the one I took out and the new one I put in and both are tough to spin. All the other bearings are open on both sides and they spin easily. Thanks in advance! Also, let me know if this would be better posted somewhere else, I'm new obviously ;)
  10. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Wooo woooo woo there. "GAS GAUGE".

    At first I thought that was just a 98-99. But your right that isn't. Looks like a late 90s RM250/450 fork. But the tubes don't look quite a thick. Probably needed new triples and thus the OE speedo had to go.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  11. Greg Bender

    Greg Bender Long timer

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    Have a read here as to how I've handled this situation:
    http://www.thisoldtractor.com/dr350_oil_hose_replacement.html

    Regards,

    Gregory Bender
    abraham_lincoln likes this.
  12. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Adventurer

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    I was really hoping my next bike would have stock analog speedo and tach and was honestly a little bummed when I learned this bike didn't have them. My first bike was a speedo only and although tach's aren't necessary I still think it'd be nice to have anyways.

    The current speedo is a digital aftermarket one and the it jumps all over the place. Sometimes it'll read an accurate speed but most the time it's jumping from 15mph to 80mph when I'm cruising at like 50, or sometimes just shows 0mph. Not the end of the world for me but something I'd like to address in the future once the necessities are fixed up.



    All I know about these forks is that they're "Race Tech" brand. Beyond that I'm not really too sure, although the seller did tell me they're fully adjustable but I don't even know anything about doing that either lol. My 1st bike was bone simple and I just got on it and rode, so having all these options for fine-tuning it really cool but also a bit over my head at the moment

    Also one of the big selling points for this bike was that it's electric start and kickstart, which I wasn't going to buy a dualsport without a kickstart so the electric start is an added plus. Although the starter button was getting stuck on and was draining my battery while riding. Disassembled the switch assembly, cleaned it out with electrical cleaner and re-soldered some fraying connections and so far so good
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  13. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Race tech is a tuning company not a fork making company. Pretty sure those are Showa forks. Take a picture of the top cap and the measure the upper slider (chrome) diameter. It will give us a clue as to what forks those are.

    Does the front wheel have a speedo drive gear on the axle? I am guess that is either a DRZ400 wheel (which would) or a RM250/450 wheel (which it wouldn't). You can still probably add a speedo drive gear and an analog speedo.
    [​IMG]
  14. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    The OEM instrument cluster does come up on eBay and other sites once in a while.
  15. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Those are 96 RM125/250 forks.
  16. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    I read this when you first wrote it, and again just now. Great article as always.

    "...kick the engine over a bunch of times before starting it to get the oil circulating..."

    Ha ha. Not any more for you.

    This picture caught my attention. The engine mounting plate looks odd. I don't recall that extra bracket and the rubber bumper (looks like the ones on the muffler to stand off the plastic side panels). Is this related to a dirt version's gas tank mount?

    [​IMG]
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  17. plugeye

    plugeye MC rescue

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    yes, i think its a damper for the dirt tank
  18. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Adventurer

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    From what it appears I don't think it does have a speedo gear. Which without that how does a digital speedo know the speed?

    [​IMG]

    Also here's the best shot of the top of the forks I could get. Your guy's guess would be better than mine:

    [​IMG]


    And the dash I'm working with:

    [​IMG]
  19. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    You can not see it in that picture but from your previous one, you can see the magnetic pick up. Yellow arrow. And one rotor bolt has been replaced with a magnetic bolt. yellow circle.
    reHNY5a.jpg

    That fork could have also come off a DRZ400 (same lowers) However that top cap only came on the dual chamber 96-98 RM250 (150 and 450).

    I know cause that is the fork I run on my 94SE
    IMG_0023.JPG
  20. Greg Bender

    Greg Bender Long timer

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    Yep, definitely a dirt model thing.

    Regards,

    Gregory Bender