DR350 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by leonphelps, May 16, 2007.

  1. hellotimmutton

    hellotimmutton Been here awhile

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    if im not mistaken, its parts 21200-14D11 (62 tooth) and 21200-15D21 (64 tooth). I believe its based on year not type. I believe 93 and below had the taller 62 tooth sprocket and 94 and up had the shorter 64, but would be nice for someone to confirm/deny that
  2. Alaska1WD

    Alaska1WD Long timer

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    I can confirm this, 90-92 all models. I am not sure about the 93 tho!!

    I bought an early 62T basket myself. This is handy for a guy like me, as I do a lot of highway and use my DR as a commuter/tour moto. I cruise at 70+ a lot so I need to keep my RPM down. The early clutch basket drops the RPM by 11.95 percent (off the top of my head FYI). As the lowest gearing a SE/cush can have is technically 15/41, which does 7200 RPM at 65 MPH, you can't run it on the highway safely/easily for very long, even though a DR350 has the power for it :(

    You can run a 15/38 (use my Huskavarna TE630 trick for the 38T cush sprocket, perfect fit;) ) but for some (like me) even that isn't a low enough RPM for the highway. I use a 15/36 myself, which is perfect for my needs. The problem with such a small rear T is that the chain slides on that black chain slider a LOT more due to the smaller rear radius. With a 62/22 replacing my currect 64/20, I can swap my 36T for a 41T and keep the same RPM and reduce chain wear! Almost a necessary choice for anybody who spends much time at all above 70 MPH... I've been over 75 MPH for over an hour on my DR racing to a lady's house (guess why! :p) and it ran great/cool as the RPM was about 6-6.5K, which is in between the peak TQ (6ish) and the peak HP (7ish). I had it at full-throttle half the time TBH. I hear stories on here about guys who cook their DR's when they keep their RPM above 8K for 5-10 minutes on the highway, It's not full throttle that pops a DR, it's crazy high RPM!

    Upping the primary+rear radius size also allows for swapping the front from 15 for 14, 13 ect without worrying about that black slider. I don't hear people mention/notice it, but I'm sure it reduces power due to friction. My slider is hot after a long ride, and I spray stuff on my chain often too. If I ran a smaller front with my 36T, I'd likely melt/wear my slider... :\

    Oh and PS, any cush rear guys interested in getting their hands on a 37T cush sprocket to fine tune their RPM? I have a sweet drill press I can use to re-drill the sprocket holes on a JTR1760 like I did with my 36T :)
    porterrad likes this.
  3. Alaska1WD

    Alaska1WD Long timer

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    I just noticed Mr. Pulldown beat me to answering this. I'll leave my post here anyways. Yes, count the teeth!

    And if you want to make your DR pleasant on the highway, mount an action-packer 8 gallon box on it. Takes a few MPG away, but it completely gets rid of any wobble/unsteadiness. The drag in the rear keeps the DR pointed straight, and I can still ride with a passenger. It's a night and day difference for me! It's the one in my profile pic :)

    Mr. Pulldown, PM me if you want to buy a cheap DR oil cooler, I think I remember you asking about one once?
  4. Alaska1WD

    Alaska1WD Long timer

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    I forgot to click reply for you, check two posts above this one, it should answer all of your questions :)
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  5. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    FYI - My 93 'S' model also had the taller-ratio clutch basket/primary gear combination. With a 435 big-bore, Vortex airbox and big-bore exhaust, it had loads of torque but did not rev nearly as freely as the stock engine. However, it happily pulled 16:41 gearing, a full 20% taller than stock, giving a true 80mph at under 6500rpm
  6. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Been here awhile

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    For a while I was really tempted on getting a Versys X-300 but I live right in the Oregon forests with lots of trails I enjoy exploring and I felt the Versys would be too road biased for that style of riding. But I still wanted to do some longer back road trips around the state, and those roads are usually cruising between 45-55mph which usually meant ringing my old XL200R out to the max in 5th. And that's when I came across the DR350 and got really sold on it since it can cruise on the roads at 50 with headroom to spare while also being pretty dirt capable.

    What especially sold me on the DR350 though is that I live about 15 miles via freeway from the nearest big town, but on my XL200R I would have to take back roads which would take about 40 minutes for me to get there. So now with the DR I can at least hop on the freeway for 15 minutes at 65mph and while it might not be the most comfortable ride it'll be a lot better than what I was doing beforehand lol

    You're right though on longer interstate trips I'll most likely need something a bit bigger and more road oriented, but trips like that can wait till 2021 since this is only my 2nd year riding and I should probably take things easy for the time being, I've still got a lot of places nearby to ride to that the DR will give me easier access to.

    I think I may try a 41T on the rear that way I could drop the front to a 14T to return to stock ratio if need be and put on a 15/16 for any longer rides I may do.
  7. everready

    everready Stuck in Ohio....Ugh!!!

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    I have a Vstrom 650 and a DR441/trailer. That combo seems to work well for me. If I want to take the DR and it's a longer ride than 3-4 hours, I trailer it now. Besides, I can take more stuff too!
    abraham_lincoln likes this.
  8. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    Good on you for taking your time gaining experience. I've done two bikes thing, one for two-up, winter commuting, and long bike trips - the other for more technical off-pavement and even some trail riding. I have owned 650 Vstroms as everready mentions and for a mostly road oriented bike but still very capable on gravel, fire/logging roads, they are nice affordable bikes. The older model motors were very smooth. I wanted a sturdier dual-sport oriented bike I could use for more technical off-pavement riding and went for a used R1200GS instead. But the Vstrom was a great highway bike and very comfortable. So that would be a good choice as a second bike one day. But with a better seat and taller gearing, the DR turned out to be better on the highway and longer trips than I thought it might be. It should serve you very well for the time being.
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  9. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Been here awhile

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    I don't know a ton about electrical but is it possible to directly swap out stock headlight/taillight bulb for an LED to put less strain on the system? Or does there need to be some modifications to run an LED light?

    I'm wanting to lighten the electrical load since I have grip warmers and am wanting to install some AUX LED's in the near future and don't want to be frying anything
  10. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    These are a straight swap and high quality. Much better than stock.
    https://www.cyclopsadventuresports.com/
    porterrad likes this.
  11. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I put a decent quality fanless H4 LED in my DR. Works great and frees up way more power than heated grips take.
  12. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    I've put an HID on my headlight and LED on tail light on my DR for the same reason with no issue. This significantly dropped my draw by about 35-40 watts. LED headlight is probably less heat than an HID and a good quality LED recently produced is probably just as bright and much easier to install than HID. At the time, HID's were much brighter than the available LED headlights.

    LED signals are less important draw wise, but I replaced those as well due to their increased brightness over stock incandescent. However, a diode adapter is needed to make them work properly with a single signal indicator on the stock dash. I mention this more for anyone else coming across this entry, because you're not running the stock dash.

    The biggest difference I made affecting the electrical system was increasing the gauge of the pos/neg wires after the connector coming off the regulator rectifier to 10ga and running them straight to the battery, bypassing the main fuse. Voltage jumped by a one volt immediately and I can now ride with my grip heaters on low and my Gerbing full jacket on high and the voltage will stay at 14.4v - 14.6v when cruising and won't go below about 13.4v even at idle. It's a risk I'm taking not having a fuse inline, but I'm experimenting at the moment. I have a negative connector block with (I believe) a 12ga wire to the battery and that caused too much resistance, so I moved the neg connector back to the battery. Makes me think that putting a fuse inline will cause too much resistance, but I haven't tried that yet.
    abraham_lincoln likes this.
  13. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    You will need to keep in mind that the charging system is NOT like the ones used in cars. There is an alternator that produces AC power and it runs WFO anytime the engine RPM is fast enough, so at highway speeds it produces ~125 watts. With no load or regulator installed it will provide as much as 60 volts which is more voltage than the DR350 system can withstand. That's why there is a rectifier/regulator in the system.

    The rectifier part changes the AC to DC and the regulator puts a load on the rectifier output which "drags down" the alternator output until the voltage is right for the system.

    With a stock system the constant loads on the system are:
    Headlight 60
    Tail light 5
    Tach and speedo lights ~6 (total)
    License light 5

    Total constant draw ~76 watts

    The remaining ~49 watts are used to charge the battery.

    When the battery is fully charged the excess energy it converted to heat in the rectifier/regulator. That's why it has cooling fins.

    If you replace the headlight with one that only requires 25 watts then the extra 35 watts are dissipated in the regulator which then runs much hotter and failure will occur after some period.

    This applies to 1994 and later models.
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  14. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    Hmmmm . . . I've been running lowered wattage for years and my RR is fine. In the warmer temps for about 8 months of the year, the heated gear isn't on.

    I've considered putting a small computer fan on it to help with the cooling. They don't draw much and it could run continually for all I care. I'm getting a custom RR built with MOSFET switching and Lithium friendly (limited to 14.2v max). I'm using an EarthX battery. But the MOSFET's are available as regular ones as well (14.5v) and are supposed to run cooler. Might be an option to consider for those still running lead acid batteries. I'd do that if a RR failed rather than stick another OEM one in there.
  15. Kestrel

    Kestrel Gear Driven Cams!!

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    There are plenty of MOSFET type reg/recs (made by Shindengen) from late model bikes that can easily be spliced into the DR350's harness. If you're worried about that, go for one of those. Cheap, and READILY available on ebay.
    porterrad likes this.
  16. OHjim

    OHjim Been here awhile

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    JNS Engineering has a whole headlight I think.
  17. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    Most of my riding has involved hauling to the Mexican border then riding 2-400 miles to get to the fun stuff. It's the constant riding above 6000 rpm that causes problems.

    On trips in the last 15 years I've seen failures on small DS bikes of other brands in addition to the DR350.

    Running a completely stock system (except for the license plate light) I've not had a problem, but others have on our trips.

    I agree that the mosfet regulators would help with this problem if you have it and if I run out of spare stock RRs I'll get one. :D
  18. abraham_lincoln

    abraham_lincoln Been here awhile

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    So should things be alright if my AUX lights are ~35 watts to compensate for the excess power then?
  19. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    If they are on all the time the load should be the same.
    Also, if you are poking around on bad dirt roads at non-expert speeds (like I do) you will not have maximum alternator output and you can run your battery down significantly.
    I sometimes use a 35 watt electric vest and have had that problem even on pavement at lower speeds.
    You can get a voltmeter and connect it right at the battery connection (this is important) and if the voltage gets too low turn off the aux lights, grips, clothing as needed to keep the battery close to 13 volts.
  20. V-Stormer

    V-Stormer Bush Basher

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    I did this with the Trail Tech voltmeter and connected it using the SAE connector for the battery charger. If I want to charge, I just unplug the volt meter, then plug it back in when the battery is charged up. The voltmeter is on the dash on the right, but it also shows time which it what it was set to when I took the pic.

    Dash Mod.png
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